•  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
30th anniversary
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Current Exhibition

EXHIBITED AT THE SAATCHI GALLERY

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Aleksandra Mir
Cold War

2005

felt tip pen on paper

482.6 x 558.8 cm
Beauty Free, Cold War Hot Stuff and Real Real Estate Flowers belong to a series of twenty huge drawings created by Aleksandra Mir and a team of sixteen assistants – mainly students and art school graduates - as part of a non-stop "Sharpie marathon" held in a temporary East Village studio, New York, during the month of May 2005. Each work consists of eight sheets of paper, pieced together in a landscape format, the common feature of which is an outlined map of the United States.
Retro text and motifs evoking idealist 1960s Americana such as the draft, the baby boom, Civil War, road trips, the space race, the Bicentennial, love and God were sketched by Mir overnight and filled in by her helpers working in shifts each day and evening using black Sharpie felt tips pens. The process of collaboration, and the use of atypical materials – in this case a humble household marker pen – are similarly integral to the artist’s working practice.
Beauty Free is a commentary on the American Civil War, a bloody conflict dominated by the issue of slavery which began in 1860 when Confederate states in the south declared their independence and claimed the right of secession from the union. The southern states are here labelled "free", the letters spelled out in stars from the country’s flag, while the northern states are threaded together by one long, continuous, looping stripe and the word "beauty". Cold War Hot Stuff employs the same device – stars in the form of snowflakes above and stripes in the form of sunbeams below – to create a contrast of warm and cold, light and dark, and, in a more overtly political sense, good and evil. Real Real Estate Flowers, probably the most psychedelic of the three, maps the officially designated flowers of each state.
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Aleksandra Mir
Beauty Free

2005

Felt tip pen on paper

482.6cm x 558.8cm
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Aleksandra Mir
Real Estate Flowers

2005

Felt tip pen on paper 482.6cm x 558.8cm

482.6 x 558.8cm
NEWSROOM 1986-2000, 2007



News becomes history as soon as it is reported. What fascinates me in talking about history is the paradoxical movement backwards while obviously propelling ahead with a story into the future. The 15-year time period covered in the show is of a recent past, a past that still unites many New Yorkers in recognition of a city at once familiar and long gone. The NYC tabloids New York Daily News and New York Post serve as practical tools that unite the population around shared joys and fears; they help spread the city’s gossip and form its identity. Whether one buys them or not, a glance at the headlines while passing by a deli or waiting for a bus is enough to be connected to the diverse masses that make up their readership. Never mind if what is reported is mostly disaster or scandal. In retrospect, news before 9/11/2001 makes this megalopolis look like a quaint town full of petty crooks, with this accident or that occasional murder resulting in the loss of a single life. A rape in Central Park and a love triangle on Long Island were the two longest running news stories of New York in the 15 years leading up to the end of the millennium.



In research for the show at the Mary Boone gallery in September-October 2007, three assistants and myself spent months in the NYC Public Library copying 10,000 covers of the two tabloids - the outcome of their combined cover stories of 15 years. From these, I selected around 200 that were particularly poignant, or which formed an ongoing narrative, but most importantly, that made me smile with recognition. I lived in New York between 1989 and 2005, 15 years that roughly coincide with the time period of the show. As I never had a studio in the city, I developed a practice that relied heavily on communication instead: phone, Internet, publishing, travel, performance, ephemera, event production. The show drew on all of the above.



During the two months of the duration of the show, I created an environment that primitively simulated a newsroom of a major agency or newspaper. The material output of the agency took the form of drawings, which for me were traces of activities such as reading, moving, talking, remembering and reporting. Together with a team of assistants, I created 200 drawings (out of which 21 are exhibited here) inspired by the aforementioned tabloid covers and my personal references to them. The gallery was turned into the studio I never had; at the same time, we produced art at a schedule more akin to a news agency than to that of an artist’s studio. Every day, there was new art and old news on the walls.



Aleksandra Mir

July 2007 / August 2008
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Aleksandra Mir
Aleksandra Mir: Newsroom 1986-2000, 2007 Cops and Teens

2007

2007 21 drawings, marker on paper 188 x 147.3 cm each

2007 21 drawings, marker on paper 188 x 147.3 cm each
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Aleksandra Mir
Cops and Teens Cops Bagged (9th July 1992)

2007

2007 21 drawings, marker on paper

188 x 147.3 cm each
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Aleksandra Mir
Cops and Teens Cop Lived For His Son (20th May 1997)

2007

21 drawings, marker on paper

188 x 147.3 cm each
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Aleksandra Mir
Cops and Teens Cop Lied (19th August 1997)

2007

21 drawings, marker on paper

188 x 147.3 cm each
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Aleksandra Mir
Cops and Teens He Won't Be A Cop Again (30th September 1994)

2007

21 drawings, marker on paper

188 x 147.3 cm each
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Aleksandra Mir
Cops and Teens Ex-Cop In Big Tix Fix (8th February 1996)

2007

21 drawings, marker on paper

188 x 147.3 cm each
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Aleksandra Mir
Cops and Teens Fugitive Cop Kills Self (8th November 1986)

2007

21 drawings, marker on paper

188 x 147.3 cm each
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Aleksandra Mir
Cops and Teens Cop's Widow Speaks (30th May 1998)

2007

21 drawings, marker on paper

188 x 147.3 cm each
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Aleksandra Mir
Cops and Teens Cowboys or Cops? (20th August 1986)

2007

21 drawings, marker on paper

188 x 147.3 cm each
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Aleksandra Mir
Cops and Teens Cops Capture Graffiti King (20th August 1986)

2007

21 drawings, marker on paper

188 x 147.3 cm each
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Aleksandra Mir
Cops and Teens Psycho Cop (12th July 1994)

2007

21 drawings, marker on paper

188 x 147.3 cm each
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Aleksandra Mir
Cops and Teens More Cops On The Way (6th August 1991)

2007

21 drawings, marker on paper

188 x 147.3 cm each
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Aleksandra Mir
Cops and Teens Cop Shoots Teen In Back (29th January 1990)

2007

21 drawings, marker on paper

188 x 147.3 cm each
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Aleksandra Mir
Cops and Teens Teen Tourist Vanishes Here (24th August 1987)

2007

21 drawings, marker on paper

188 x 147.3 cm each
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Aleksandra Mir
Cops and Teens Why Teen Had Her Dad Killed (14th September 1987)

2007

21 drawings, marker on paper

188 x 147.3 cm each
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Aleksandra Mir
Cops and Teens Slashed Teen Played Possum (12th May 1988)

2007

21 drawings, marker on paper

188 x 147.3 cm each
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Aleksandra Mir
Cops and Teens Killing Spree Teen Seized (10th January 1988)

2007

21 drawings, marker on paper

188 x 147.3 cm each
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Aleksandra Mir
Cops and Teens Teens For Sale (4th June 1992)

2007

21 drawings, marker on paper

188 x 147.3 cm each
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Aleksandra Mir
Cops and Teens Cop Shot (27th July 1998)

2007

21 drawings, marker on paper

188 x 147.3 cm each
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Aleksandra Mir
Cops and Teens 2 Cops Shot (23rd August 1994)

2007

21 drawings, marker on paper

188 x 147.3 cm each
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Aleksandra Mir
Cops and Teens 3 Cops Shot (19th January 1996)

2007

21 drawings, marker on paper

188 x 147.3 cm each
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Aleksandra Mir
Cops and Teens 4 Cops Shot (13th August 2000)

2007

21 drawings, marker on paper

188 x 147.3 cm each
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Aleksandra Mir
Stock Market: '87 Crash Wall St. Bloodbath (19th October 1987)

2007

5 drawings, marker, paper

188 x 147.3 cm
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Aleksandra Mir
Stock Market: '87 Crash Stox Ride The Seesaw (20th October 1987)

2007

5 drawings, marker, paper

188 x 147.3 cm
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Aleksandra Mir
Stock Market: '87 Crash Wall St. On A Roll (21st October 1987)

2007

5 drawings, marker, paper

188 x 147.3 cm
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Aleksandra Mir
Stock Market: '87 Crash Fed $$$ Fail To Nip Dip (22nd October 1987)

2007

5 drawings, marker, paper

188 x 147.3 cm
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Aleksandra Mir
Stock Market: '87 Crash TGIF! (23rd October 1987)

2007

5 drawings, marker, paper

188 x 147.3 cm
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Aleksandra Mir
Stock Market: Up And Down Monday Madness (16th October 1989)

2007

15 drawings, marker, paper

188 x 147.3 cm
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Aleksandra Mir
Stock Market: Up And Down What A Ride! (5th April 2000)

2007

15 drawings, marker, paper

188 x 147.3 cm
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Aleksandra Mir
Stock Market: Up And Down Nightmare On Wall St. (14th October 1989)

2007

15 drawings, marker, paper

188 x 147.3 cm
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Aleksandra Mir
Stock Market: Up And Down Panic! (20th October 1987)

2007

15 drawings, marker, paper

188 x 147.3 cm
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Aleksandra Mir
Stock Market: Up And Down Raging Bull (14th February 1997)

2007

15 drawings, marker, paper

188 x 147.3 cm
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Aleksandra Mir
Stock Market: Up And Down Whew! (29th October 1997)

2007

15 drawings, marker, paper

188 x 147.3 cm
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Aleksandra Mir
Stock Market: Up And Down Free Fall! (16th/17th November 1991)

2007

15 drawings, marker, paper

188 x 147.3 cm
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Aleksandra Mir
Stock Market: Up And Down Scary! (5th April 2000)

2007

15 drawings, marker, paper

188 x 147.3 cm
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Aleksandra Mir
Stock Market: Up And Down How Now, Dow (23rd October 1987)

2007

15 drawings, marker, paper

188 x 147.3 cm
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Aleksandra Mir
Stock Market: Up And Down Dow Picks Itself Up (17th October 1989)

2007

15 drawings, marker, paper

188 x 147.3 cm
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Aleksandra Mir
Stock Market: Up And Down Soar Point (3rd June 2000)

2007

15 drawings, marker, paper

188 x 147.3 cm
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Aleksandra Mir
Stock Market: Up And Down Relief! (24th October 1987)

2007

15 drawings, marker, paper

188 x 147.3 cm
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Aleksandra Mir
Stock Market: Up And Down Sell Of A Day (1st September 1998)

2007

15 drawings, marker, paper

188 x 147.3 cm
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Aleksandra Mir
Stock Market: Up And Down After The Fall (21st October 1987)

2007

15 drawings, marker, paper

188 x 147.3 cm
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Aleksandra Mir
Stock Market: Up And Down Black Friday (15th April 2000)

2007

15 drawings, marker, paper

188 x 147.3 cm

ARTICLES

THE BELIEVER

Christopher Bollen Interview with Aleksandra Mir

In 1999 on a Dutch beach, Aleksandra Mir constructed a lunar landscape out of sand, erected an American flag on the highest peak, and declared herself 'The First Woman on the Moon.' The year before, in Norway, Mir teamed up with a local unemployment agency and showed a series of Hollywood disaster films, running them only during work hours, for the city's unemployed. In Denmark in 1996, she set up twenty six speakers in a town square and broadcast the sound of men whistling as women walked by. Earlier this year, she proposed the building of an exact-scale replica of Stonehenge, only a few miles from the original site. Unlike the first, 'Stonehenge II' offers full access to visitors-down to a 'Stonehenge' soccer team that uses the rocks as goalposts.

Certainly the aforementioned productions are not spun from the mind of an artist particularly comfortable working within the safe confines of traditional art practices. In fact, Aleksandra Mir could be accused of not practicing safe art at all. While much of the New York art community is still hermetically limited to the boundaries of white gallery walls, this thirty-six-year old Polish-born Swedish citizen (who currently lives in Manhattan) seems to go out of her way to destroy the convention that good art is made by an artist in one space and delivered to a quiet viewing public in another. Mir's work is disruptive and ever-evolving; audience reactions are often just as crucial as the initial piece itself. And, best of all, her work refuses to stick to national borders, observe the codes, follow the peace, comb its hair, and keep to itself.

Read the entire article here
Source:aleksandramir.info



Aleksandra Mir: Swiss Institute
By Jeffrey Kastner

Naming Tokyo, 2003-, the most recent product of Aleksandra Mir's ever-growing conceptual cottage industry, demonstrates both the artist's numerous strengths and her particular limitations. The piece seen here is the second part of a project originally commissioned by the Palais de Tokyo in Paris; like all the prolific New Yorker's best work, it's informed by a generative interest in social systems and a fondness for offbeat forms of dissemination. Combining the enduring appeal of maps as sites for theoretical play and a cheerfully wayward brand of activist zeal, the project was inspired, in Mir's words, by "the fact that westerners often complain that Tokyo has no street names. So I felt it would be interesting to start naming the streets of Tokyo with words from western culture and society, to help us around. Tokyo is large, so I asked my friends for help."
Mir has successfully deployed this sort of ingenuous participatory mode before. In Daily News, 2002, she enlisted over a hundred friends to contribute texts and images to a special Aleksandra Mir birthday edition of the New York tabloid designed to "reclaim" her birthday, which falls on September 11. For Naming Tokyo, dozens of acquaintances inside and outside the art world pitched in with thematic lists of suggested street names--Italian swear words, Vivienne Westwood's couture collections, New York City drag queens--which were then published on a large handout map with a blank Tokyo city grid on one side and selected rechristenings on the other.

Read the entire article here
Source: www.findarticles.com