Selected works by André Butzer

André Butzer
Ahnenbild 2411

2006

oil on canvas

280 x 460cm
André Butzer’s mural-like canvases are a compression of painting’s recent history in all its totality, animated by the artist’s trademark anarchic visual codes. Ahnenbild 2411 (2006) is overrun with a roughly executed, psychedelic use of colour and the frantic repetition of a hollow-eyed mask, at turns grinning like early 20th-century cartoons or expressing ugliness and terror à la Munch’s Scream or de Kooning’s Woman paintings.
André Butzer
Untitled

2007

oil on canvas

260 x 340 cm
The repetition of the same exaggerated, anxious faces and unmasked pleasure in the physical act of painting appears in two works named Untitled (both 2007). A sense of urgent immediacy is articulated through their high impasto technique and vivid, almost neon-toned colours. Butzer doodles wildly over dark or light backgrounds in separated, unblended clusters, reminiscent of Joan Mitchell’s abstract expressionist canvases. His embrace of an unapologetically bright and varied paint box is conceptual: ‘Colour is basically about history. To animate colour is historic in the way that the image will tell us about the future and the past.’
André Butzer
Untitled (Monochromes Bild)

2007

oil on canvas

260 x 320 cm
Three other Untitled works (all 2007), which also combine abstraction with figuration, explore similar ideas but through a much more restrained almost greyscale palette. Their pared-down unfilled faux naïve geometric shapes recall surrealist compositions and Cy Twombly’s accumulated mark-making. Equally romantic and nihilistic, the artist has described these works as ‘the kind of things Donald Duck would do when he paints’.
André Butzer
Erinnerung an Gottfried Feder (Nachricht vom Tode)

2007

oil on canvas

260 x 340 cms
André Butzer
Untitled

2007

Oil on canvas

260 x 340 cms
André Butzer
Friedens-Siemens XVII

2007

Oil on canvas

260 x 320 cm
André Butzer
Untitled

2007

Oil on canvas

260 x 340 cm
André Butzer
Untitled

2007

Oil on canvas

340 x 260cm
André Butzer
Untitled

2007

Oil on canvas

200 x 260 cm
André Butzer
Untitled

2008

Oil on canvas

340 x 250 cms

Articles

andre butzer at max hetzler - berlin


For his first show with Max Hetzler, Andre Butzer presented eight large oil paintings in the main gallery, plus a selection of watercolors and drawings in another room. The disparity between the two spaces was marked. Entering the first gallery meant being almost overwhelmed by the size, color and smell of the paintings; the watercolors and drawings in the back were thin and flat by comparison.

Seven of the paintings measure 8 feet 2 inches by 6 1/2 feet and depict a single figure. Woman (2002), for example, presents a character with a skull-like head, black circles for eyes, and a simple curve for a smile. Her big black hairdo plays against a magenta background. She resembles a royal Egyptian mummy whose face didn't survive as well as her wig. She raises an orange stump of an arm in jovial greeting.

The eighth, Chips and Pepsi and Medicine (2003), after which the show was named, is huge at 9 3/4 by 14 1/2 feet, and contains seven grotesquely childlike figures, smiling and waving as if assembled for a celebration. The heavily applied reds, blues, yellows and greens, smeared and dripped across the canvas, create forms that melt into one another. Often, it is only possible to distinguish one character from the next by the change in color. To get an idea of the impact of this picture, imagine a hybrid of de Kooning's iconic "Woman" paintings and any of Ensor's threateningly comic "skeleton" images re-created without the complexity of line and form. Subtitled Happiness, this was the most exuberant work in the exhibition. In it, Halloween pranksters, carnival dancers and aliens seem to pose for the kind of high-spirited group portrait that has everyone mugging for the camera.

Read the entire article here
Source: findarticles.com



andre butzer at METRO PICTURES- NEW YORK


Visitors to Andre Butzer's recent show at Metro Pictures found themselves, in the opening gallery, stared down by four giant, cartoonlike figures from 10-by-7-foot paintings barely big enough to hold them. All four wear antique, stiff white collars above shapeless clothes. The canvases on which they appear are so thickly impastoed as to verge on the sculptural. The 35-year-old artist's bravado neo-expressionism plainly owes a debt to its 1980s precedents, though Butzer professes to be as interested in the future as the past, describing his practice as science fiction expressionism. While it's easy to find yourself thinking of artists ranging from de Kooning to Basquiat, Joan Mitchell to Joyce Pensato, Butzer's work fully holds its own. This is his New York solo debut after one-man shows, over just the last couple of years, in Munich, Vienna, London, Moscow and Berlin. The busy artist has also founded an artists' collective and is a publisher and editor.

In Roter Mann Edvard Munch (all works 2007), a mustard-shirted man stares from round black eyes in a face resembling that in The Scream. Resting on the painting's surface are diagram-like, squiggly brown and blue lines describing connected squares and triangles. The subject of Untitled (Wanderer) wears a brown coat, one white glove and a mad grimace. He lunges from a green ground, his eyes also great black circles. Splotches of yellow and orange, and seemingly a whole tube of red, lie indiscriminately on figure and ground. Each figure has two pairs of flaplike shapes emerging from his cheeks; with their staring eyes, they resemble SS death's heads. Their comparatively innocent-looking, smiling companions Heinrich Butzer Limonadenfabrikant ('lemonade manufacturer'), with his oval, citrusy-yellow head, and Frau, with her pink coat and friendly wave, both have oval eyes with prominent whites, as if drawn by a child.

These paintings' free intermingling of abstraction and figuration found further expression in Metro's back room, where the 15-by-27-foot Viele Tote im Heimatland: Fanta, Sprite, H-Milch, Micky and Donald! Was flanked by two 11-foot-high untitled abstractions. The large canvas, whose title translates to 'many dead in the homeland' pictures a primal stew in which floats 16 heads over a broadly brushed blue, green and orange ground. Faces and ground alike are splattered with read; the combination of violence with na've drawing evolves a child's rendition of a death camp or the aftermath of school shooting. Another room displayed several smaller, sketchlike works, Untitled (mehrere Figuren) resembled a group snapshot of Butzer's trademark characters as children. Untitled (mit-N-Haus) depicts a couple outside a red N, for Nasaheim. Butzer's fictional combination of NASA and Anaheim, the California city ('home on the Santa Ana River') originally settled by Bavarians and later by Disneyland. Nasaheim's curious melding of science and fantasy, juvenile and sophisticated, German and America, nicely encapsulates Butzer's ambitious project.

Read the entire article here
Source: artinamericamagazine.com