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    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
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SELECTED WORKS BY Andrea Fraser

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Andrea Fraser
Untitled (de Kooning/Raphael) #1

1984

Digital c-print

101.6 x 76.2 cm
Andrea Fraser’s Untitled series stems from a project she completed in 1984, which consisted of a collection of slides superimposing images of Old Masters’ works with those of well known 20th century artists. Having reconstructed these images as photographs, pieces such as Untitled (de Kooning/Raphael) #1 examine the polemics of feminism, historical revisionism, and artistic authenticity. Here, traces of De Kooning’s violently rendered figure scars the beatific Madonna and Child, merging the two disparate examples of the subjectification of women in art history as a Frankenstein-ish amalgamation. Printed in poster size, Fraser highlights issues of sexual commodification and image consumption.
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Andrea Fraser
Untitled (de Kooning/Raphael) #2

1984

Digital c-print

101.6 x 76.2 cm
In Andrea Fraser’s Untitled (de Kooning/Raphael) #2, The Seated Madonna and De Kooning’s expressionistic figure synthesise to become almost indistinguishable; the brutal modern abstraction making the cherubic icon appear charred and battle worn. Presented as a second generation photographic image, Fraser’s Untitled loses the painterly detail of the original masterpieces, transforming the aura of artistic integrity to the mechanised and fetishistic language of media. Through her act of appropriation, Fraser explores the exclusive nature artistic lineage, writing herself into the legacy whilst simultaneously critiquing its historical bias.

ARTICLES

Critiqueus Interruptus The lady is not a tramp: Andrea Fraser replaces sensationalism with adoration
By Jerry Saltz

"Andrea Fraser is a whore": That's how a fellow critic responded when I told him I was writing on Fraser's current show. As evidence he cited "Untitled," Fraser's one-hour silent video shown in 2004 in which she has what she called "just regular sex" with an art collector who reportedly paid $20,000, "not for sex," according to the artist, but "to make an artwork." The collector, collaborator, co-star, John, or whatever you want to call him, was a sturdy white man in his early forties. Fraser-who in recent years has regularly appeared nearly or completely naked in her work-is this cute, nerdy looking librarian-type above the neck but some ultra-worked-out Super Theory Woman below the shoulders.
The sex in "Untitled" is stilted but sweet. After sitting and talking, he awkwardly touches her, she kisses him, then initiates most of what follows. After mutual oral sex they have intercourse in several positions. He apparently ejaculates inside her (which seems pretty intimate to me).

Defending "Untitled" to my angry critic acquaintance, I talked about women taking control, Baudelaire's idea of the artist as prostitute, institutional critique art that risks being vulnerable, reality TV, and reminded him that men like Chris Burden and Vito Acconci did illegal and sexual things in their work and no one ever called them "whores." He wasn't swayed. Fraser had evidently crossed some sort of ethical-aesthetic gender-specific line.

Read the entire article here
Source: villagevoice.com