Selected works by Ann Toebbe

Ann Toebbe
The Doctor's Wife

2011

Cut paper, paint, acetate, glue on paper

190.5 x 322.6 cm

Ann Toebbe’s flattened interiors have the look of both a board game and a cut-out paper home for dolls; either way, her architectural spaces are unpopulated, hinting sarcastically, in both title and details, at a social type who’ll slot in nicely. In The Doctor’s Wife, a family kitchen is laid out diagrammatically. There are the containers for foodstuffs, arranged in descending order of size; the food processor, ready to whizz; the vegetables, freshly chopped by the sink; the perfect garden, with its bowers and white picket fence.

Ann Toebbe
The Grocer's Wife

2011

Cut paper, paint and glue on paper

190.5 x 254 cm

The imagined occupant is externally defined (by her spouse’s occupation, by the stuff in her house), and her lack of interiority is implied, most obviously, by her absence: she’s not there because, well, she’s not there, even when she is. The Grocer’s Wife is less socially elevated, as the title sardonically hints: its linoleum floor, in squiggled paint at odds with Toebbe’s schematic rendering of cupboards and stools, suggests a humbler income, though the interior is no less oppressively over determined.

Ann Toebbe
The Photo Engraver's Wife

2011

Cut paper, paint and glue on paper

190.5 x 254 cm

Imagined occupants must move in line with the space they occupy, and it’s hard to imagine anyone other than a cut out character, shuffled around by game-playing children, inhabiting such a place. This, perhaps, is Toebbe’s point – that an ideal of personhood is no more inhabitable than a flattened-out interior.
This lends her works their ghostliness; life reduced to a pattern is still haunted by the viewer’s projected inhabitants, like children’s toys given strange life through the power of the imagination.

Text by Ben Street


Articles

ANN TOEBBE
11th March 2011, Ann Toebbe, It’s Nice That

Filling up our guest post slot this week is Chicago based painter, Ann Toebbe. Her dimensionally challenged paper cuts and paintings caught our collective eye a while back and we’re hoping that with her daily posts we can expand that view with some context into the remarkable world she depicts. Starting of course with a couple questions from our end…
What have you got planned this week?
Paint, change diapers, sleep.
What do your parents think you do?
They think I’m what I am, a mother and a painter.
Who do you look like?
People say I look a bit like Monica Seles without the muscles.
What’s your favourite sense?
Taste. I love to eat. I like to see things too but would give up sight if I had to choose between the two.
Tell us something people don’t know about you.
I would keep the bag of money if I found it on the train.
Did your education count?
Yes but I’ll be paying for it until I’m 50.
What word can’t you spell?
Rythym rhythym rhythm – got it but always takes a few tries
Tell us a good fact
Two parts yellow plus one part red and a little blue makes brown
What’s Next?
Large cut paper kitchens for The Chicago MCA’s 12×12 project space (date TBA).
What’s your ‘Plan B’?
Plan B: move back in with my parents

Source: itsnicethat.com


RED PLASTIC PLATES BY ANN TOEBBE
March 9, 2010, by Sabine, MOCOLOCO

Ann Toebbe was brought up in the Midwest, but it was only once she moved to the East Coast that she became aware of the aesthetics of her childhood. This piece is made from cut paper that Toebbe paints by hand and then combines to create the composition and is a salute to a familiar Midwestern style.
"Red Plastic Plates captures the humor of the culture clash I sometimes feel when I introduce new people to my family. My husband and step-son were visiting my parent's home in Cincinnati for the first time and my mother, to my horror, insisted on serving dinner in the dining room on red plastic plates with plastic cups, plastic silverware, and paper napkins. I love my mother and can now thank her for creating the image for Red Plastic Plates."

Source: mocoloco.com


THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART (MCA) PRESENTS ANN TOEBBE LATEST COLLAGES AND PAINTINGS
MCA,Art knowledge news.com

Chicago artist Ann Toebbe’s latest collage paintings were inspired by her husband's grandmother, Mary Bard's 1949 book 'The Doctor Wears Three Faces' about the expectations and isolation of being a doctor's wife, which was made into the movie 'Mother Didn’t Tell Me'. Herself a mother of two, Toebbe began thinking about the role of women within the home, then and now, and the ongoing centrality of the kitchen within domestic life. Comprised of three large-scale collage paintings made of individually cut and painted pieces of paper - The Doctor’s Wife (7 x 10 ft), The Grocer’s Wife (6 x 8 ft) and the Photo-Engraver's Wife (6 x 8 ft) - Toebbe's exhibit is based on conversations she had with her mother, mother-in-law and step-mother-in law centered on fond memories of their childhood kitchens, and the difficulties of being married and a mother in the 1940s and 50s. They each wrote a short text and made a drawing describing their mother’s kitchen, which Toebbe uses as the basis of her paintings. Her vivid visions of domestic spaces bring to life often overlooked details of the environments of daily life, which become the cornerstone of memories. They also reflect issues of class difference and a shared material culture. The disorienting, flattened perspective derives from her study of Russian icon painting, Cubism, and folk art. Originally from Cincinnati, Ohio, Toebbe received a BFA from the Cleveland Institute of Art and her MFA from Yale University, and now resides in Chicago. Toebbe’s work has been shown in solo and group exhibitions in Chicago, New York, Boston, Cincinnati, and San Francisco, among others.
One of the nation's largest facilities devoted to the art of our time, the Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA) offers exhibitions of the most thought-provoking art created since 1945. The MCA documents contemporary visual culture through painting, sculpture, photography, video and film, and performance. Located in the heart of downtown Chicago, the MCA boasts a gift store, bookstore, restaurant, 300-seat theater, and a terraced sculpture garden with a great view of Lake Michigan. The mission of the MCA is to be an innovative and compelling center of contemporary art where the public can directly experience the work and ideas of living artists, and understand the historical, social, and cultural context of the art of our time. The Museum boldly interweaves exhibitions, performances, collections, and educational programs to excite, challenge, and illuminate our visitors and to provide insight into the creative process. The MCA aspires to engage a broad and diverse audience, create a sense of community and be a place for contemplation, stimulation, and discussion about contemporary art and culture. The Museum of Contemporary Art Collection has outstanding examples of visual art from 1945 to the present with a strong focus on surrealism, minimalism, conceptual photography, and work by Chicago-based artists. At the time of its opening, the Museum claimed 7,000 objects, including works by Marcel Duchamp, Bruce Nauman, and Alfredo Jaar. Today, the museum's collection consists of 2,345 objects, as well as about 2,500 artist's books. The collection features visual art from 1945 to the present, including work by artists from Lee Bontecou to Robert Smithson. Notable works in the museum's collection include, "Polychrome and Horizontal Bluebird" by Alexander Calder, "Cindy" by Chuck Close, "In Memory of My Feelings - Frank O'Hara" by Jasper Johns, "Study for a Portrait" by Francis Bacon and "Campbell's Soup Cans II" by Andy Warhol. During the 2008 fiscal year the MCA Celebrated its 40th anniversary, which inspired gifts of works from artists such as Dan Flavin, Alfredo Jaar, and Thomas Ruff. Additionally, the museum expanded its collection by acquiring the work of some of the artists it presented during its anniversary celebration such as Carlos Amorales, Tony Oursler, and Adam Pendleton.

Source: artknowledgenews.com