•  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
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Current Exhibition

SELECTED WORKS BY Ara Dymond

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Ara Dymond
Cameo

2011

Cast bronze, steel, rubber balls

132 x 49 ½ x 42 cm
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Ara Dymond
Buster

2010

Sapelli, lacquer, ranger board

58 ½ x 40 ½ x 51 cm

ARTICLES

Exhibition: Ara Dymond and Jason Nocito

Artnews, Jan 2011

Ara Dymond and Jason Nocito are presented for the first time at Taxter & Spengemann in a two person exhibition. Each artist possesses a master focus, a severe sift and edit technique that is intuitive rather than calculated, thoughtful rather than systematic. Images and objects seemingly all harden back to the figure, which should be noted here as a touchstone for both artists, a symbol, a receptacle for thoughts and fluids, an actor, an historical icon and at some point- dead. Throughout these photographic and sculptural works are subtle, suggestive, almost lewd and certainly beautiful takes on nothing new-- captured and cast in their own discreet time to show us who we are, in ways we haven’t seen before.
Ara Dymond :
The sculptures might be thought of as figures, or characters, or actors in an opera or a play. The gallery, and at least one of the paintings, might be imagined as a theater, or a stage.
How do these figures belong to the each other, and to the world? It is a question that occupied Francis Bacon from beginning to end—and one that he was able to solve (if one can call it that) only negatively: by reducing the world to a schema, making of belonging a violent shorthand, embellished but never relieved by occasional outbursts of flamboyant décor.
It is this same drama—that of the figure in space, or rather the figure and its ground—that Dymond articulates.
Note that the artist has stated the matter in a mainly phenomenological manner: but since he is also a mimic, his works in no way preclude metaphorical complication, up to and including a collapse of all meta-narratives into an old-fashioned infinity of signs.


Read the entire article here

Source: artnews.org