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    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
Saatchi Art
Saatchi Store
Current Exhibition

SELECTED WORKS BY Grisha Bruskin

LOGI
Grisha Bruskin
LOGI

1986

Canvas,oil

88х105
WAR GAMES
Grisha Bruskin
WAR GAMES

1988

Canvas, oil

52х125
BORDER GUARD WITH A GERMAN SHEPHERD DOG
Grisha Bruskin
BORDER GUARD WITH A GERMAN SHEPHERD DOG

1998

Porcelain

diameter 31 сm
In the Name of the Happiness of Humanity

"Stalinist imperial porcelain of the 1940s, celebrating the victory over theNazis as well as the generals, heroes and leader of the war, was expertly produced and generously decorated. Taking Sévres and Russian imperial porcelain as models, Soviet master craftsmen made gener­ous use of deep cobalt and gold with engraving. Oak and laurel leaves, engraved onto the gold, symbolized honor, glory, and power.
I used this technique in my work on the series of plates called «Fundamental Lexicon».
For this purpose, I found, at the Kuznetsov porcelain factory, old masters who still remembered the secrets of the craft.
The series consists of nine objects. Along the edge in gold letters runs a text memo­rized by millions of Soviet people: an excerpt from a monologue by Pavel Korchagin, urging a life sacrificed in the name of the «happiness of humanity»: «The most precious thing we have islife itself. It is granted to us just once and it must be lived so that we need never torment ourselves over years spent to no purpose, nor burn with shame over a petty and mean-spirited past, so that on our deathbed....» The text breaks off on its own deathbed, in memory of the hundreds of thousands of people who perished following the advice of the hero of Ostrovsky’s novel, «How the Steel Was Tempered».
The characters correspond in many ways to the sculptural group «Life is Everywhere». The heroes are placed on the top of a mountain, in the heavenly ethers, symbolizing their absolute nature and their perfection. Among them are strange, absurd, or «incorrect» images. For example: the teacher with the chart showing the circulatory system in the human body, the prisoner with the slogan «To freedom with a clear conscience», the Soviet scientist studying lightning.
The whole work is to a great extent absurd and ironic. Irony and the absurd are not used for ridicule, but as a way of describing life".
Grisha Bruskin
“Life is Everywhere”, Publishing house “Palas”
YOUNG PIONEER LEADER WITH A LOUDSPEAKER
Grisha Bruskin
YOUNG PIONEER LEADER WITH A LOUDSPEAKER

1998

Porcelain

Diameter 31 cm
In the Name of the Happiness of Humanity

"Stalinist imperial porcelain of the 1940s, celebrating the victory over theNazis as well as the generals, heroes and leader of the war, was expertly produced and generously decorated. Taking Sévres and Russian imperial porcelain as models, Soviet master craftsmen made gener­ous use of deep cobalt and gold with engraving. Oak and laurel leaves, engraved onto the gold, symbolized honor, glory, and power.
I used this technique in my work on the series of plates called «Fundamental Lexicon».
For this purpose, I found, at the Kuznetsov porcelain factory, old masters who still remembered the secrets of the craft.
The series consists of nine objects. Along the edge in gold letters runs a text memo­rized by millions of Soviet people: an excerpt from a monologue by Pavel Korchagin, urging a life sacrificed in the name of the «happiness of humanity»: «The most precious thing we have islife itself. It is granted to us just once and it must be lived so that we need never torment ourselves over years spent to no purpose, nor burn with shame over a petty and mean-spirited past, so that on our deathbed....» The text breaks off on its own deathbed, in memory of the hundreds of thousands of people who perished following the advice of the hero of Ostrovsky’s novel, «How the Steel Was Tempered».
The characters correspond in many ways to the sculptural group «Life is Everywhere». The heroes are placed on the top of a mountain, in the heavenly ethers, symbolizing their absolute nature and their perfection. Among them are strange, absurd, or «incorrect» images. For example: the teacher with the chart showing the circulatory system in the human body, the prisoner with the slogan «To freedom with a clear conscience», the Soviet scientist studying lightning.
The whole work is to a great extent absurd and ironic. Irony and the absurd are not used for ridicule, but as a way of describing life".
Grisha Bruskin
“Life is Everywhere”, Publishing house “Palas”
RETIRED WOMAN WITH A MODEL OF THE LENIN MAUSOLEUM
Grisha Bruskin
RETIRED WOMAN WITH A MODEL OF THE LENIN MAUSOLEUM

1998

Porcelain

Diameter 31 cm
In the Name of the Happiness of Humanity

«Stalinist imperial porcelain of the 1940s, celebrating the victory over theNazis as well as the generals, heroes and leader of the war, was expertly produced and generously decorated. Taking Sévres and Russian imperial porcelain as models, Soviet master craftsmen made gener­ous use of deep cobalt and gold with engraving. Oak and laurel leaves, engraved onto the gold, symbolized honor, glory, and power.
I used this technique in my work on the series of plates called «Fundamental Lexicon».
For this purpose, I found, at the Kuznetsov porcelain factory, old masters who still remembered the secrets of the craft.
The series consists of nine objects. Along the edge in gold letters runs a text memo­rized by millions of Soviet people: an excerpt from a monologue by Pavel Korchagin, urging a life sacrificed in the name of the «happiness of humanity»: «The most precious thing we have islife itself. It is granted to us just once and it must be lived so that we need never torment ourselves over years spent to no purpose, nor burn with shame over a petty and mean-spirited past, so that on our deathbed....» The text breaks off on its own deathbed, in memory of the hundreds of thousands of people who perished following the advice of the hero of Ostrovsky’s novel, «How the Steel Was Tempered».
The characters correspond in many ways to the sculptural group «Life is Everywhere». The heroes are placed on the top of a mountain, in the heavenly ethers, symbolizing their absolute nature and their perfection. Among them are strange, absurd, or «incorrect» images. For example: the teacher with the chart showing the circulatory system in the human body, the prisoner with the slogan «To freedom with a clear conscience», the Soviet scientist studying lightning.
The whole work is to a great extent absurd and ironic. Irony and the absurd are not used for ridicule, but as a way of describing life».
Grisha Bruskin
“Life is Everywhere”, Publishing house “Palas”
MAN WITH STALIN'S PORTRAIT
Grisha Bruskin
MAN WITH STALIN'S PORTRAIT

1998

Porcelain

Diameter 31 cm
In the Name of the Happiness of Humanity

«Stalinist imperial porcelain of the 1940s, celebrating the victory over theNazis as well as the generals, heroes and leader of the war, was expertly produced and generously decorated. Taking Sévres and Russian imperial porcelain as models, Soviet master craftsmen made gener­ous use of deep cobalt and gold with engraving. Oak and laurel leaves, engraved onto the gold, symbolized honor, glory, and power.
I used this technique in my work on the series of plates called «Fundamental Lexicon».
For this purpose, I found, at the Kuznetsov porcelain factory, old masters who still remembered the secrets of the craft.
The series consists of nine objects. Along the edge in gold letters runs a text memo­rized by millions of Soviet people: an excerpt from a monologue by Pavel Korchagin, urging a life sacrificed in the name of the «happiness of humanity»: «The most precious thing we have islife itself. It is granted to us just once and it must be lived so that we need never torment ourselves over years spent to no purpose, nor burn with shame over a petty and mean-spirited past, so that on our deathbed....» The text breaks off on its own deathbed, in memory of the hundreds of thousands of people who perished following the advice of the hero of Ostrovsky’s novel, «How the Steel Was Tempered».
The characters correspond in many ways to the sculptural group «Life is Everywhere». The heroes are placed on the top of a mountain, in the heavenly ethers, symbolizing their absolute nature and their perfection. Among them are strange, absurd, or «incorrect» images. For example: the teacher with the chart showing the circulatory system in the human body, the prisoner with the slogan «To freedom with a clear conscience», the Soviet scientist studying lightning.
The whole work is to a great extent absurd and ironic. Irony and the absurd are not used for ridicule, but as a way of describing life».
Grisha Bruskin
“Life is Everywhere”, Publishing house “Palas”
RESEARCHER WITH LIGHTING
Grisha Bruskin
RESEARCHER WITH LIGHTING

1988

Porcelain

Diameter 31 cm
In the Name of the Happiness of Humanity

«Stalinist imperial porcelain of the 1940s, celebrating the victory over theNazis as well as the generals, heroes and leader of the war, was expertly produced and generously decorated. Taking Sévres and Russian imperial porcelain as models, Soviet master craftsmen made gener­ous use of deep cobalt and gold with engraving. Oak and laurel leaves, engraved onto the gold, symbolized honor, glory, and power.
I used this technique in my work on the series of plates called «Fundamental Lexicon».
For this purpose, I found, at the Kuznetsov porcelain factory, old masters who still remembered the secrets of the craft.
The series consists of nine objects. Along the edge in gold letters runs a text memo­rized by millions of Soviet people: an excerpt from a monologue by Pavel Korchagin, urging a life sacrificed in the name of the «happiness of humanity»: «The most precious thing we have islife itself. It is granted to us just once and it must be lived so that we need never torment ourselves over years spent to no purpose, nor burn with shame over a petty and mean-spirited past, so that on our deathbed....» The text breaks off on its own deathbed, in memory of the hundreds of thousands of people who perished following the advice of the hero of Ostrovsky’s novel, «How the Steel Was Tempered».
The characters correspond in many ways to the sculptural group «Life is Everywhere». The heroes are placed on the top of a mountain, in the heavenly ethers, symbolizing their absolute nature and their perfection. Among them are strange, absurd, or «incorrect» images. For example: the teacher with the chart showing the circulatory system in the human body, the prisoner with the slogan «To freedom with a clear conscience», the Soviet scientist studying lightning.
The whole work is to a great extent absurd and ironic. Irony and the absurd are not used for ridicule, but as a way of describing life».
Grisha Bruskin
“Life is Everywhere”, Publishing house “Palas”
TEACHER WITH A DIAGRAM OF HUMAN BLOOD CIRCULATION
Grisha Bruskin
TEACHER WITH A DIAGRAM OF HUMAN BLOOD CIRCULATION

1998

Porcelain

Diameter 31 cm
In the Name of the Happiness of Humanity

«Stalinist imperial porcelain of the 1940s, celebrating the victory over theNazis as well as the generals, heroes and leader of the war, was expertly produced and generously decorated. Taking Sévres and Russian imperial porcelain as models, Soviet master craftsmen made gener­ous use of deep cobalt and gold with engraving. Oak and laurel leaves, engraved onto the gold, symbolized honor, glory, and power.
I used this technique in my work on the series of plates called «Fundamental Lexicon».
For this purpose, I found, at the Kuznetsov porcelain factory, old masters who still remembered the secrets of the craft.
The series consists of nine objects. Along the edge in gold letters runs a text memo­rized by millions of Soviet people: an excerpt from a monologue by Pavel Korchagin, urging a life sacrificed in the name of the «happiness of humanity»: «The most precious thing we have islife itself. It is granted to us just once and it must be lived so that we need never torment ourselves over years spent to no purpose, nor burn with shame over a petty and mean-spirited past, so that on our deathbed....» The text breaks off on its own deathbed, in memory of the hundreds of thousands of people who perished following the advice of the hero of Ostrovsky’s novel, «How the Steel Was Tempered».
The characters correspond in many ways to the sculptural group «Life is Everywhere». The heroes are placed on the top of a mountain, in the heavenly ethers, symbolizing their absolute nature and their perfection. Among them are strange, absurd, or «incorrect» images. For example: the teacher with the chart showing the circulatory system in the human body, the prisoner with the slogan «To freedom with a clear conscience», the Soviet scientist studying lightning.
The whole work is to a great extent absurd and ironic. Irony and the absurd are not used for ridicule, but as a way of describing life».
Grisha Bruskin
“Life is Everywhere”, Publishing house “Palas”
BUREAUCRAT WITH SOVIET MOURNING BANNER
Grisha Bruskin
BUREAUCRAT WITH SOVIET MOURNING BANNER

1998

Porcelain

Diameter 31 cm
IMMATE WITH THE SLOGAN
Grisha Bruskin
IMMATE WITH THE SLOGAN

1998

Porcelain

Diameter 31 cm
In the Name of the Happiness of Humanity

«Stalinist imperial porcelain of the 1940s, celebrating the victory over theNazis as well as the generals, heroes and leader of the war, was expertly produced and generously decorated. Taking Sévres and Russian imperial porcelain as models, Soviet master craftsmen made gener­ous use of deep cobalt and gold with engraving. Oak and laurel leaves, engraved onto the gold, symbolized honor, glory, and power.
I used this technique in my work on the series of plates called «Fundamental Lexicon».
For this purpose, I found, at the Kuznetsov porcelain factory, old masters who still remembered the secrets of the craft.
The series consists of nine objects. Along the edge in gold letters runs a text memo­rized by millions of Soviet people: an excerpt from a monologue by Pavel Korchagin, urging a life sacrificed in the name of the «happiness of humanity»: «The most precious thing we have islife itself. It is granted to us just once and it must be lived so that we need never torment ourselves over years spent to no purpose, nor burn with shame over a petty and mean-spirited past, so that on our deathbed....» The text breaks off on its own deathbed, in memory of the hundreds of thousands of people who perished following the advice of the hero of Ostrovsky’s novel, «How the Steel Was Tempered».
The characters correspond in many ways to the sculptural group «Life is Everywhere». The heroes are placed on the top of a mountain, in the heavenly ethers, symbolizing their absolute nature and their perfection. Among them are strange, absurd, or «incorrect» images. For example: the teacher with the chart showing the circulatory system in the human body, the prisoner with the slogan «To freedom with a clear conscience», the Soviet scientist studying lightning.
The whole work is to a great extent absurd and ironic. Irony and the absurd are not used for ridicule, but as a way of describing life».
Grisha Bruskin
“Life is Everywhere”, Publishing house “Palas”
MAN WITH A TABLE OF ORDENS AND MEDALS
Grisha Bruskin
MAN WITH A TABLE OF ORDENS AND MEDALS

1998

Porcelain

Diameter 31 cm
In the Name of the Happiness of Humanity

«Stalinist imperial porcelain of the 1940s, celebrating the victory over theNazis as well as the generals, heroes and leader of the war, was expertly produced and generously decorated. Taking Sévres and Russian imperial porcelain as models, Soviet master craftsmen made gener­ous use of deep cobalt and gold with engraving. Oak and laurel leaves, engraved onto the gold, symbolized honor, glory, and power.
I used this technique in my work on the series of plates called «Fundamental Lexicon».
For this purpose, I found, at the Kuznetsov porcelain factory, old masters who still remembered the secrets of the craft.
The series consists of nine objects. Along the edge in gold letters runs a text memo­rized by millions of Soviet people: an excerpt from a monologue by Pavel Korchagin, urging a life sacrificed in the name of the «happiness of humanity»: «The most precious thing we have islife itself. It is granted to us just once and it must be lived so that we need never torment ourselves over years spent to no purpose, nor burn with shame over a petty and mean-spirited past, so that on our deathbed....» The text breaks off on its own deathbed, in memory of the hundreds of thousands of people who perished following the advice of the hero of Ostrovsky’s novel, «How the Steel Was Tempered».
The characters correspond in many ways to the sculptural group «Life is Everywhere». The heroes are placed on the top of a mountain, in the heavenly ethers, symbolizing their absolute nature and their perfection. Among them are strange, absurd, or «incorrect» images. For example: the teacher with the chart showing the circulatory system in the human body, the prisoner with the slogan «To freedom with a clear conscience», the Soviet scientist studying lightning.
The whole work is to a great extent absurd and ironic. Irony and the absurd are not used for ridicule, but as a way of describing life».
Grisha Bruskin
“Life is Everywhere”, Publishing house “Palas”

Grisha Bruskin's BIOGRAPHY

Grisha Bruskin
“Some time long ago, while living in Communist Russia, I began to create my own collection (the painting ‘Fundamental lexicon”); it seemed to me, that communism in Russia was unshakeable, that the army was strong beyond measure, the KGB was everywhere and that Soviet rule, like the reign of the Egyptian pharaohs, would stretch on for several thousand years. I wanted to look at the mythical space in which I lived from the perspective of an academic, who had discovered the village of an unknown African tribe
 My ideas were directed towards sending a message to the man of the future. To suggest that he look at my art, as we look at ancient Egyption art in the Louvre or Hermitage.”
Grisha Bruskin

Born in 1945
Grisha Bruskin (the artist pseudonym of Grigory Davidovich Burskin) gained world fame in 1988 at the first auction of Russian art at Sotheby’s in Moscow, when his painting “Fundamental Lexicon” (1986), in which the figures, carrying emblems of official Soviet culture, brought together on huge plates, was purchased for a record price and made Bruskin one of the most successful Russian artists in the West. His works, in which myths of socialism and Judaism are interlaced, are displayed in the world’s leading museums. The artist works in highly disparate mediums: painting, etchings, sculpture. In 1999 he created a monumental triptych for the restoration of the Reichstag in Berlin, and in 2001 he published a book of memoirs “The Past Imperfect.” He lives and works in New York.

“Bruskin reviews the process of the twilight of the Soviet empire from the perspective of the New Testament, promising the decline and fall of all empires. But at that time he was enthralled above all by the aesthetic aspect of this decline – the aesthetics of the fall as it was. Namely this enthusiasm encouraged him to relive the fall of Soviet culture in the form of an artistic performance
 Bruskin reproduces history as a conscious farce, i.e. as art. What was once history returns as an artistic event, as a performance.” Boris Groys.