•  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
Saatchi Art
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Current Exhibition

EXHIBITED AT THE SAATCHI GALLERY

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Caragh Thuring
1973

2006

Oil & acrylic on linen

183 x 244 cm
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Caragh Thuring
Maeght I

2007

Oil on linen

122 x 183 cm
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Caragh Thuring
Maeght II

2007

Oil on linen

122 x 183 cm
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Caragh Thuring
The Industrialist

2007

Oil on linen

183 x 244 cm
Thuring is interested in heavy industry’s ratios of man to landscape and construction effort to function: the enormous amount of engineering that goes into industrial structures that perform relatively simple tasks. Thuring sees this cumbersome relationship and potential futility as inherent to the act of painting. The Industrialist was developed from an image of an unfinished girdered building. The hard geometry of the architecture becomes dissembled through Thuring’s loose brush strokes, creating a space that’s both technological and human.
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Caragh Thuring
General Scenes of Unloading

2008

Oil on linen

199 x 250 cm
Thuring often works directly on linen canvas and leaves its bare surface visible in many places. This replicates the aesthetics of a draught or blueprint. General Scenes Of Unloading is one of two paintings of a London docklands scene that Thuring made at the same time; this canvas contains all the imagery that she didn’t include in the other painting. For Thuring, the docklands are a complete eco-system where each element has a function that is part of an interdependent network. She is interested in how machinery can exist as a created ‘personality’ by dint of its manufacture or function. In her painting Thuring translates the scene intuitively; fragments of cranes, pipes, and security barriers become isolated and she highlights certain details while omitting others. Each separate vignette is painted in a delicate gestural way, like a cherished portrait.
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Caragh Thuring
View From Bridge 1937

2006

Oil, ink and paper on linen

183 x 244 cm
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Caragh Thuring
Hardtack

2007

Oil, rope and graphite on linen

183 x 244 cm
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Caragh Thuring
409

2008

Oil and gesso and ink on linen

244 x 335 cm
The black line that meanders through Caragh Thuring’s 409 retraces the actual flight path of a glider over the Alps. Thuring recreates this event with minimal information: a building, mountain, aircraft, and line. Each element is rendered independently and in disproportionate scale. This creates a heightened awareness of the flat picture plane and exposes the multiple ways we understand space as an illusion. For example, the house rises from the bottom of the canvas, an assumed ‘earth’, and the mountain is much smaller, and made to look ephemeral or hazy, as if it was in the distance. The line of the flight path, pictorially at the fore, is ‘above’, looking down on everything else; it also looks like a map or a landscape paradoxically creating a solid ground.

ARTICLES

Reading Painting Through Camera Lucida Sean Ashton

During a visit to Caragh Thuring's studio I was fascinated by an object she asked me to hold as she manoeuvred a large painting into position for my appraisal. It was a piece of paper about five feet long and one foot wide on which had been stuck, in rows resembling hieroglyphs, numerous photographic oddments culled from various sources and annotated with pencil, paint etc. Not quite a study for a painting and not quite a sketchbook, but nevertheless an object in its own right, this ongoing visual almanac betrayed the strange sense of conquest entailed in the consumption of photographic imagery, and its regurgitation as painted imagery.

Of all visual artists, painters are by far the most prolific processors of visual data. This is due to the fact that not all imagery yields to painterly conquest; large quantities must therefore be consumed. In my experience, painters are more articulate about the individual elements that comprise a painting (i.e., where they have come from, how they have been altered, what else was considered and rejected) than about its overall effect, which appears to resist the painter"s verbal appraisal as a necessary condition of its completion. So it follows that one has a better chance of understanding the work if one approaches it from the specific rather than the general. Consider this anecdote from Nigel Cooke's article, "George Condo's Elite Pathology" (Turps Banana, Issue 2, June 2006):
On discussing a work of mine in progress, (Condo) insisted that a finished area was in fact far from it - it needed something extra. For Condo it would never really work without the addition of another object, and he returned to the subject now and then as the evening drew on, making suggestions one after another, hoping to offer me the right image. Later, as we parted company, he announced that he had exactly the right thing for me. The painting needed an owl in it - with an arrow piercing its eyeball.

Of course, not every painter's compulsions are as perverse as George Condo's. Hence, "Whilst the owl made it into the finished painting, the arrow didn"t": the painting could accommodate a nocturnal raptor, but not the recommended ocular violence.

This notion of a painting"s timbre being thrown off-key by the addition of a single element is one that painters are constantly wrestling with: a painting may begin as a set menu of compositional elements, only to substitute many items for others as an unforeseen pictorial substrate emerges during the painting process. There are painters who suppress this shift and there are painters who candidly draw attention to it. In Caragh Thuring's work, the set menu of elements with which she begins appears to create a timbre that is off-key from the outset, or harmonious as much by accident as by design - as though musicality were being sought rather than asserted

Read the entire article here
Source: ashwinstreet.com