Charlie Billingham

Selected works by Charlie Billingham

Charlie Billingham
Wigged Bum (Yellow Dot)

2012

Oil and acrylic on conservation polyester

100 x 85 cm
Although we can identify things in Charlie Billingham’s work as part of a certain idea of the past – baggy britches, towering wigs, swags of jewellery, vaguely scatological humour – their presentation (in bits, in fragments) suggests a kind of dispersal, a refusal to fully cohere. Billingham holds the bits at bay: the past stays past. Late 18th and early 19th century motifs – big Regency bums in wigs or britches; bonnets with cascading feathers; big-buttoned waistcoats – are repeated in an array of decorative colours, either as wallpaper or as reversible motifs on canvases.
Charlie Billingham
Wigged Bum 2

2012

Oil and acrylic on conservation polyester

100 x 85 cm
That repetition, the past becoming décor, is a part of Billingham’s idea of history: that it becomes, for us, a disconnected thing, a sequence of changing tastes, a theme for a costume party. Billingham’s motifs derive from the satirical prints of the late 18th/early 19th century caricaturists Cruikshank and Gillray, whose works were themselves designed for mass reproduction; by transforming them into painting, Billingham subtracts their political specificity and treats them instead as what the artist calls “a symbol of a certain type of taste”.
Charlie Billingham
Bum 2

2012

Oil on canvas

100 x 85 cm
In A Voluptuary under the horrors of Digestion, Gillray’s satirical 1792 image of the Prince Regent (known in his time as “the Prince of Whales”) is stretched into near-abstraction, its speckles of dripped colour a reminder of Billingham’s historical distancing: print becoming paint. A six-leaf folding screen, meanwhile, composed of the bottom halves (front and back) of three different paintings of the Three Graces, with images of fountains on the other side, seems concerned with lost ideals of beauty. Their rendering – loose, gestural, vague – is part of their sense of absence: they’re not quite here.
Charlie Billingham
Bum 3

2012

Oil on canvas

100 x 85 cm
Charlie Billingham
3 Graces/Fountains Screen

2012

6 leaf folding screen consisting of 12 oil paintings on canvas, hard wood frame, brass hinges

172 x 348 cm
Charlie Billingham
A Voluptuary Under The Horrors Of Digestion

2012

Oil on canvas

180 x 300 cm
Charlie Billingham
Wigged Bum 5

2012

Oil on canvas

100 x 85 cm
Charlie Billingham
Wigged Bum 6

2012

Oil on canvas

100 x 85 cm
Charlie Billingham
Wigged Bum 7

2012

Oil on canvas

100 x 85 cm
Charlie Billingham
Wigged Bum 8

2012

Oil on canvas

100 x 85 cm
Charlie Billingham
Bum 5

2012

Oil and acrylic on conservation polyester

100 x 85 cm
Charlie Billingham
Bum 6

2012

Oil on canvas

100 x 85 cm
Charlie Billingham
Bum 7

2012

Oil and acrylic on conservation polyester

100 x 85 cm
Charlie Billingham
Bum 8

2012

Oil on canvas

100 x 85 cm
Charlie Billingham
Bonnet 2

2012

Oil on canvas

100 x 85 cm
Charlie Billingham
Bonnet 3 (Elizabeth)

2012

Oil on canvas

100 x 85 cm
Charlie Billingham
Bonnet 4 (Elizabeth)

2012

Oil on canvas

100 x 85 cm
Charlie Billingham
Bonnet 5

2012

Oil on canvas

100 x 85 cm
Charlie Billingham
Promenade 2

2012

Oil and acrylic on canvas

100 x 85 cm
Charlie Billingham
Torn

2012

Oil on canvas

100 x 85 cm
Charlie Billingham
P.P

2012

Oil and acrylic on conservation polyester

100 x 85 cm
Text by Ben Street
Charlie Billingham
Installation shot






Articles

WHAT IS NOT BUT COULD BE IF
We 24th March 2010, What Is Not But Could Be If blogspot

What is not but could be if, is a group show by four artists; Charlie Billingham, Leah Lovett, Melis van den Berg and Adam Parkinson, working in various disciplines from video and new media to painting, live art and sculpture. The work deals with the potentiallitty at the heart of each of their practices, be that a fictional narrative or proposed future.
In his most recent work Billingham has taken two of Seurat’s most famous works, ‘Bather’s at Asnières’ (1884) and ‘Sunday afternoon on the island of La Grande Jatte’ (1884-1886). The original paintings work as a pair, raising a number of serious socio-political issues, but now they can only be seen together in print. Billingham has created full size reproductions in exaggerated half-tone, the resultant lack of detail from this translation is evocative of the inability to see the originals as they were intended highlighting the poignant loose of meaning and context both images suffer.

Source: whatisnotbutcouldbeif.blogspot.com