•  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
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Current Exhibition

SELECTED WORKS BY Dana Frankfort

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Dana Frankfort
Believe Believe Believe

2006

Oil on canvas on panel

114.3 x 213.4 cm
Merging graffiti and high art abstraction Dana Frankfort’s paintings occupy a hazy space between verbal and visual communication. Using text as a platform for expressive embellishment each canvas reveals a word or phrase within its sumptuous surface; simple statements such as ‘Believe’, ‘Beyond’, or ‘Paint’ become esoteric starting points for the physical negotiation of painting.


Adapting text as the subject for her paintings, Frankfort distils both the poetic and formal qualities of the written word. Repeatedly scrawled, painted over, scribbled out, and intensified, each slogan becomes abstracted as a series of intersecting lines, curves and angles, their meanings amplified and distorted through the gesture and surface quality of their manifestation.


Simultaneously brutal and ethereal, Frankfort’s canvases draw from the lineage of Howard Hodgkin and Morris Louis in their intensity of colour, impassioned brushstrokes, and linear compositions. The sophistication of Frankfort’s process belies the imperative of her sentiments. The urgency of her aesthetic is contrasted with time consuming processes of sanded surfaces, premeditated spill patterns, and calculated layers of matte and high-gloss finish. Through this considered arbitration, Frankfort frames her text with the complexity of psychological depth, creating a palimpsest of memory and emotive association.
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Dana Frankfort
Beyond

2006

Oil on panel

144.8 x 243.8 cm
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Dana Frankfort
Beyond Beyond

2006

Oil on canvas on panel

114.3 x 213.4 cm
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Dana Frankfort
Lines

2006

Oil on canvas on panel

152.4 x 152.4 cm
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Dana Frankfort
Thinker

2006

Oil on panel

121.9 x 121.9 cm

ARTICLES

Dana Frankfort at Brooklyn Fire Proof
Art In America, February 2006 By Joe Fyfe

One of the most refreshing aspects of Dana Frankfort's debut exhibition was how clearly the paintings demonstrated her lack of interest in eccentricity of materials, exactitude of finish, imagery of any kind, bright nursery colors and self-conscious quirkiness of execution to name a few options that have recently been overused by younger painters.

Frankfort's work is made with hand-held brushes, from-the-tube colors and smallish, store-bought stretchers or largeish homemade wooden panels. Mostly what she does is paint a word or phrase and then repaint it until she is satisfied with the results. The texts and numerals Frankfort uses ('OK', 'Yes', 'For the love of God' or a phone number) tend to be verbal material that comes from the place in one's mind that is still busy producing language even when nothing in particular is going on.

The basic sticks-and-curves architecture of numbers and the alphabet provides ample tools for composition. Frankfort�s brusque, nonchalant methodology belies a careful, precise eye, revealed in how stray pieces of color left at the edges or stuck incongruously on the surface of a painting often turn out to be essential compositional elements. There is evidence of much underpainting and sanding, as well as sideways or upside-down drips, and contrasts between shiny and matte surfaces, dry and puddled passages of painting, often all in a single work.

Frankfort has no set program, she seems most interested in visually pleasing herself. When interviewed at the gallery, Frankfort mentioned that she has a large number of supports going at any given time and feels free to change to a different word or phrase during the painting process.

The title of the exhibition, What's So Funny?, could be a stock phrase that didn't make it into the paintings, but it also comes across as a challenge to the viewer, an assertion that Frankfort is serious about what she's doing.

SHe is one of a new crop of young painters, which includes Cordy Ryman and Wallace Whitney, who intuit that their work can stand up to newer, currently fashionable mediums such as large-format color photography, as well as video and film installations, if it focuses on its own materiality and internal rules. After all, this is how the Impressionists facecd the initial challenge of photography and the Cubists dealt with the movies.

Read the entire article here
Source: brooklynfireproof.com