•  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
Saatchi Art
Saatchi Store
Current Exhibition

SELECTED WORKS BY Dash Snow

Untitled, (Hell)
Dash Snow
Untitled, (Hell)

2005

Digital C-Print

50.8 x 50.8 cm
For Dash Snow photography becomes a way of engaging with environment and memory. Each snapshot captures a place, time, and emotion, freeze-framing the individual components of everyday experience, mapping out the compilation of an identity. Using a Polaroid camera for its instantaneous results and association as keep-sakes, the familiar format of Snow’s photos replicates the sentiments of his images: cheap, disposable, and plebian mementos become humble evidence of discarded beauty.

Documenting his life through a lens, Snow’s photographs explore personal existence as a periphery to globalised culture. Presenting an unabridged account of his marginalised lifestyle, Snow’s often uncomfortable images paint an intimate portrait where topical issues such as sex, drugs, poverty, and anti-social behaviour are confronted from a frank position of personal participation. Translated through the generic quality of his medium, Snow’s photos convey the disoriented fragments of memory as voyeuristic observation, conceiving the experience of ‘self’ as a bi-product of mass media dissociation.

Picturing the underbelly of contemporary culture, Snow distances his images with cinematic veritas. Graffiti, ironically broken signage, seedy hotel sex romps, and instances of human despair don’t evoke empathy, but rather suggest a poetic affirmation of humanity and against-the-odds survivalism.
Untitled, (We Can Handle It)
Dash Snow
Untitled, (We Can Handle It)

2003

Digital C-Print

50.8 x 50.8 cm
Untitled, (LA Drunk on Cart)
Dash Snow
Untitled, (LA Drunk on Cart)

2003

Digital C-Print

50.8 x 50.8 cm
Untitled, (Jesus Loves U)
Dash Snow
Untitled, (Jesus Loves U)

2003

Digital C-Print

50.8 x 50.8 cm
Untitled, (Dakota Smoking)
Dash Snow
Untitled, (Dakota Smoking)

2003

Digital C-Print

50.8 x 50.8 cm
Dash Snow’s Untitled (Thong) reworks imagery of porn, violence, and glamour into a totem of faded power. Recalling the optimistic ideology of Suprematist design, Snow’s collage presents a futuristic icon from degenerate emblems. Mounted on a mundane wall paper background, photocopied snippets of syringes, gems, rodents, machine parts and bottoms merge as an abstracted cyborg figure, an unsavoury goddess of underclass bravura.
Incest the Game the Whole Family Can Play

Incest the Game the Whole Family Can Play

Dash Snow
Incest the Game the Whole Family Can Play

2006

Unique photo, vintage record player, hand painted record, hand painted cinder blocks

Photo 121.9 x 76.2cm
Installation dimensions variable
Using the aesthetics of an instructional display, Dash Snow sets a poster-sized photograph above a Fischer Price record player mounted on a stack of cinderblocks in his Incest The Game… Made from painted construction bricks, Snow’s plinth provides a harsh domestic foundation over which he pits pubescent taboo. The snogging teenagers in the photograph are surrounded by a strange lighting effect, the lamps in the background giving the illusion of a ghostly presence or mystical aura. Accompanied by a toy turntable rotating a hand painted LP, Snow alludes to the confusing state between childhood and the adult world, made more daunting through sinister implication.
Untitled
Dash Snow
Untitled

2006

Digital C-Prints

223.5 x 120.7 cm
In Dash Snow’s Untitled, three photographs are arranged in vertical succession, creating a loose narrative in their film strip composition. Intentionally ambiguous, his blurred and cropped images simulate intoxicated perception, encapsulating seedy late night ambience with fragmented distortion. Shot from an obscure floor-level angle, Snow places the viewer in the position of the paralytic; his obscure glimpses of pub life transform the benign into hallucinatory visions of the bizarre and grotesque.
Untitled (Diptych)
Dash Snow
Untitled (Diptych)

2006

Digital C-Prints

Left: 121.9 x 100.3 cm
Right: 127 x 97.8cm
Dash Snow’s Untitled presents a double tragedy with frank candour. In the image on the left, Snow photographs a newspaper clipping of Pat Tillman, an American professional footballer who famously gave up his career at the top of his game to serve his country in Iraq and Afghanistan, where he was sadly killed by friendly fire. Juxtaposed against another media image of an Islamic father rushing through war torn territory clutching his terrified daughter, Snow offers a diptych as protest, highlighting the consequences of conflict and its impossible morality.
Polaroid wall

Polaroid wall

Polaroid wall

Polaroid wall

Polaroid wall

Dash Snow
Polaroid wall

2005

20 enlarged Polaroid photographs c-print

20 x 20 ins each
Dash Snow originally started taking photos when he was a yobbish teenager. Using his Polaroids as a diaristic record of the many ‘nights before’ he couldn’t remember, his snapshots piece together a fragmented portrait of peripheral existence. Filling in the voids of his blackouts, Snow’s photos broach the seedy and taboo with a dislocated intimacy. Suggesting a subplot of double-identity, Snow’s camera operates as a tool of psychological intervention. Creating a ‘memory bank’ through a lens, he becomes an observer of his own life, forging the personal as dissociative media experience. Working in similar genre to Nan Goldin and Richard Billingham, Snow’s images are uncomfortable in their subject matter. Instances of sex, drugs, violence, and poverty are documented with disarming frankness and honesty. Offering a unique insight into an alternative lifestyle, Snow uncovers a poetic beauty within the dissolute and discarded.

Dash Snow's BIOGRAPHY

Dash Snow
1981
Born in New York


SOLO EXHIBITIONS



2006
Sutton Lane, London
Rivington Arms, New York

2005
Moments Like This Never Last, Rivington Arms, New York


GROUP EXHIBITIONS



2006
Group Show with Nico Dios, Ry Fyan, and Dash Snow, The Proposition, New York
Survivor, Bortolami Dayan, New York
Day For Night, Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
Good Bye To All That, Rivington Arms, New York

2005
Live Through This: New York 2005, Deitch Projects, Miami
Interstate, Nicole Klagsbrun, New York
“With us against reality, or against us!”, Willy Wonka Inc. Oslo, Norway and Galleri S.E, Bergen, Norway

2003
Session the Bowl, Deitch Projects, New York
a NEW new york scene, Galerie du Jour Agnes b., Paris, France
Don‘t Be Scared, Rivington Arms, New York