Selected works by David Noonan

David Noonan
Untitled

2006

Screen print on board

188 x 133 cm
David Noonan
Untitled

2006

Screen print on laminated plywood

188 x 199.5 cm
Beginning each of his screen prints by making a collage, David Noonan brings together an eclectic array of found imagery – sourced from film stills, books, magazines, and archive photos – to create dramatic scenes that suggest surreal narratives. These collages are then photographed and turned into large-scale screen prints, a technique remarkable for its sumptuous finish that relates to both artistic authenticity and mass media. Printed in harsh contrast black and white, Noonan’s images encapsulate the romanticism of golden age cinema, and its associations to memory, fiction, and modern mythology.

Approaching image making with an auteur’s indulgence, Noonan presents a fabricated vision that is awesome in its complexity. Using the liturgy of art itself as a departure point for invention, Noonan conceives his work as ‘documentation’ of plausible performances: his cast of characters are positioned as participators in highly elaborate artworks, invoking covert and futuristic ritual. Stylistically referencing Surrealism and experimental film, Noonan’s work poses as the aesthetic remnants of ‘lost masterpieces’, weaving his own extravagant fantasies into fabric of collective consciousness.

Piecing together plausible narratives from his readymade motifs, Noonan renders the intimacy of psychological space as indistinguishable from public cognisance. Using the qualities of photomontage to replicate the linear aspects of film, Noonan’s disparate imagery collates to convey a transient sense of time and space that is both theatrical and strangely insular. Through his process of screen printing, Noonan capitalises on the effects of transluscent layering and exaggerated lighting to replicate the flickering chimera of cinematic projection; an intangible illusion simulating the abstraction of dreams.
David Noonan
Untitled

2006

Screen print on laminated plywood

188 x 133 cm
David Noonan
Untitled

2006

Screen print on laminated plywood

188 x 133 cm
David Noonan
Untitled

2006

Screen print on birch plywood

200 x 188 x 8 cm
David Noonan
Untitled

2008

Silkscreen on linen and jute collage

210 x 300 cms
David Noonan
Untitled (Figures)

2008

2 sculptures each on birch ply and steel

Dimensions variable

Articles

David Noonan

David Kordansky Gallery is pleased to present the first Los Angeles solo exhibition by the London based, Australian born artist David Noonan. Historical imaginations, invented memories, bohemianism and late 20th century British theatre inspire David Noonan's installation of large-scale screen prints, collages and bronze sculptures.

Within his large-scale montages, Noonan fabricates stills of ersatz performances involving gurus, masked figures, harlequins, and exotic fauna. These participants are presented in a cosmological and psychological realm. Noonan hints at a mythology without provenance and suggests an inexplicable scene beyond the material world. The work's layered, cinematic imagery becomes like a physical interpretation of filmic space and at times alludes to the surrealist and complex constructions of Latin American filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky in films such as Holy Mountain and Fando y Lis.

In his collages, Noonan intensifies ambiguous black and white imagery collected from disparate sources, mainly books and magazines, by reassembling them according to a personal logic. Johanna Fahey describes one of Noonan's previous installations as a custom-made flashback, tailored with an appreciation for aesthetics [used] to create a historical flavor. In Noonan's new series, visions of a quasi spiritual, separatist community, a pagan cult of sorts, are prompted by photographs of children and adults dancing, hugging, and practicing abstract artwork.

Within these peculiar scenes preachers, doting fathers, and mother figures nurture youth through seemingly ritualistic acts. The work perhaps serves as a simulated narrative of David Noonan's childhood, but the imagination is a disobedient historian and the fiction within the work is profoundly dominant.

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Source: davidkordanskygallery.com