Selected works by Dustin Pevey

Dustin Pevey
Untitled

2015

Acrylic, graphite, spray paint, inkjet on canvas

142 x 315 cm
Dustin Pevey
Untitled

2015

Acrylic, graphite, spray paint, inkjet on canvas

193 x 284 cm
Dustin Pevey
lkdsjhben

2015

Graphite, spray paint, vinyl, acrylic, inkjet on canvas

162.6 x 121.9 cm
Dustin Pevey
iennwqq

2015

Graphite, spray paint, vinyl, acrylic, inkjet on canvas

162.6 x 121.9 cm

Articles

ART AND ABOUT (1): MIND GAMES
17 November 2014, by John Issaacs,imby (in my back yard)

The approaches of two young artists introduced in concurrent shows at Retrospective’s two, very different galleries converge in their fascination with how mental impressions are projected onto white space, though in no way stylistically.
At the other end of the spectrum, in “Everything and Nothing at Once”, beautifully hung in the wonderful arcade-like gallery at 711 Warren, Dustin Pevey, who works out of both Brooklyn and Marfa, Texas, extracts equally fragmentary but far more complex, often trompe l’oeil imagery with a great deal of technical, and indeed technological, dexterity in a series of twelve large, classically proportioned, particularly hypnotic canvases. Seamlessly layered acrylics, graphite, spray paint, and inkjet impressions mysteriously coalesce to great effect, hovering, gossamer-like, on the plain white field as shadows of the artist’s consciousness.

In their opposing styles, both artists intelligently and vividly remind us that our impressions are but fleeting appearances within the fundamental void.

Read the entire article here
Source: imby.com


MICHAEL FARLEY’S ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH ROUNDUP
December 2014, by Michael Farley,Bmore Art

I didn’t want to like these paintings because they are so very much like the trendy, ironically-corporate, seriously-successful Tumblr art that’s left Brooklyn’s transplant-dominated art scene (The*) Jogging in place for the past few years (*bad pun intended). But these have a depth—both physically and conceptually—that seems to resist translation to photography and subsequent re-blogging. Unlike a vector image of a pixelated Nike swoosh, these are a little less obvious and have a lot of traces of the human hand. There are moments where painterly washes partially obscure hard-edged logos or inkjet-printed imagery—details that are best observed in-person and not in a thumbnail image online. The collage-like components—symbols of consumption or desire—are all fragmented but still recognizable. As disembodied parts of a whole, some of the images themselves are somewhat macabre, but still function as a synecdoche referring to their respective brands like a severed hand that refuses to stop pursuing the protagonists of a horror film.

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Source: bmoreart.com


CREATIVELY EMBRACING MANY POSSIBILITIES; DUSTIN PEVEY MELDS PAINTING, PHOTOGRAPHY
December 2014, by Amy Griffin, Times Union

Since its invention, photography has influenced painting and vice-versa. While there have always been artists who blur the lines between the two, digital applications are freeing up artists to combine them in new ways, adding another layer of complexity.

In his current solo show at Retrospective in Hudson, Dustin Pevey effectively does just that, employing digital photography and paint to make layered paintings that raise questions about what is "real." What's painted and what's photographed? Does it even matter?

This isn't straight painting and it's certainly not straight photography. He melds the two into something less easy to categorize. His process starts and ends in the studio as he photographs haphazard still lifes made from seemingly random objects. After photographing them, he then digitally plays around with them, adding and subtracting things, combining other images he's made or found on the Web and corporate logos or pieces of them. He then prints them on prepared canvases on an Epson inkjet printer. He mounts the printed canvases onto stretchers and goes to work in acrylic, spray paint, and pencil.

With paint, he continues his process of redacting sections and adding in new elements. In "vgvgvgcd," (many of his titles look like what happens when you place your fingers on the wrong keys of the keyboard), he has covered a large photo of a window in a thin white wash that adds to the confusion about whether it's painted or photographed. In the upper left corner, he's clearly painted in a camouflage pattern and a large ripped piece of paper floats over the window, its shadow repeating across the window behind it. Blobs of black and color are added and some, in turn, painted over again.

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Source: timesunion.com


DUSTIN MICHAEL PEVEY
July, 2008, by Rebekah Drysdale, Daily Serving

Dustin Michael Pevey creates large-scale graphite drawings that confront the viewer and comment on our contemporary cultural convictions. To the artist, these include “the ideas of disillusionment, distraction, competition, obsession, and progress.” The above image, entitled The End Ad Nauseum, is composed of several smaller images referencing war, pollution, death, and violence. A hastily scribbled (and partially erased) question, “Why won’t my fucking drug dealer text me back?”, provides us with another, more personal way to enter the work. This assortment of imagery forces us to address our own feelings regarding the state of humanity today. Are we disillusioned, distracted, competitive, and obsessed?

Read the entire article here
Source: dailyserving.com