•  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
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Current Exhibition

EXHIBITED AT THE SAATCHI GALLERY

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Eberhard Havekost
Bowling 2

2000

Oil on Canvas

200 x 200cm
Based in Dresden, Eberhard Havekost often paints the city’s modernist-style buildings as a means to reference 20th century post-war politics and failed utopian vision. Havekost explores the parallels between these systemic ideas of perfection and the modes of ideal image construction. Working from his own collection of photos and video footage, Havekost alters the original images on a computer: hues are subtly altered, forms imperceptibly stretched and skewed. These complications are then further translated through the process of painting. What Havekost presents isn’t photographic precision, but rather transient moments of abstracted perception; the intentional ‘errors’ make the image appear more natural and visually pleasing. In Bowling 2, the tower block has been altered in its perspective and lighting. The attenuate distortion transforms an instance of banality into one of harmonious beauty.
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Eberhard Havekost
CAR PARK 4

2001

Oil on Canvas

90 x 180cm
Using the devices of photographic representation, Eberhard Havekost exposes the complex processes by which images are interpreted and inter-related. In Carpark 4, the picture is cropped to extreme close up; a scene read as momentary glimpse or ‘snap shot’. Through painting, Havekost transforms this plebeian view to create a disquieting experience from the overtly familiar. Editing the image down to its most functional elements, Havekost’s painting becomes almost pure abstraction: the windscreen is a field of fluctuating depth, framed by compositional blocks of colour. By selectively emphasising and omitting an image’s qualities, Havekost’s paintings operate like memory. Their associative form becomes subliminally dismantled for intimate contemplation and rumination.
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Eberhard Havekost
Intro 1

2001

Oil on Canvas

80 x 180cm
In Intro I, Eberhard Havekost uses the representational as a point of departure into the abstract; the subject of the airplane becomes incidental to the compositional form it creates. Elongated bands of colour stretch across Havekost’s canvas advancing and receding in tonal perspective; the shapes and patterns of the plane act as elements of geometric design. Havekost uses thin layers of paint to emphasise the painting’s contradictory flatness. Intro I possesses a feeling of weightlessness reminiscent of film projection.
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Eberhard Havekost
Kontakt

1998

Oil on Canvas

180 x 129cm
Radiating with the promise of newness, Eberhard Havekost’s Kontakt stresses the graphic qualities of high-rise buildings and the US flag to institute a logo-ised model of America. Devoid of any humanistic detail, Havekost’s scene is reduced to a grid of flat colour. By outlining the flag with heavy black line, Havekost draws reference to Pop Art. Here consumerism and uniformity combine to generate an astringently alien effect, awesome in its power and superficiality. Predating 9/11, Kontakt contains an almost ominous forbearance, emblematic of an unblemished innocence.
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Eberhard Havekost
Mobile 1

2002

Oil on Canvas

140 x 200cm
Eberhard Havekost re-invents painterly supremacy. Taken from personal photos and media sources, his imagery is rendered to highlight the limits of their own mechanically reproduced distortion: speed is represented with the blurry lines of film, colours are unnatural, and grim buildings and landscapes are given a clinical rebirth. Seeing painting as a method of improving on reality, Havekost portrays his subjects with a harsh artificial light, making intimately recognisable scenes seem stiffly manufactured and strange, resonating with the newness of expertly packaged products. In Mobile 1, Eberhard Havekost paints a train carriage: attending only to its formal elements his familiar image is twice removed from reality, becoming a casual mixture of lines and squares, a pure representation of modernity and momentum.
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Eberhard Havekost
Untitled

1997

Oil on Canvas

150 x 100 cm
“Because I always see the precise photographic basis while I paint, I sense how the image forever oscillates between two levels of meaning,” Eberhard Havekost explains. “What I see while I experience, I combine with the act of looking at an image produced by the media.” Through his layered process, Eberhard Havekost is acutely aware of how a painting inherently departs from its original subject to gain its own self-referential dynamic. In Untitled, his tower block becomes almost unrecognisable from its source. Translated through the organic intervention of his brush, Untitled invents its own values of interpretation: the meditative qualities of surface, composition and gesture.

Quotes taken from ‘Interview with Florian Illies’ Intervista Con La Pittura Gianni Romano, Postmedia Books 2003.
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Eberhard Havekost
Shelf

2002

Oil on Canvas

94 x 180cm
Eberhard Havekost’s Shelf does the opposite of what a still-life should. Unlike traditional still-life painting where consumables are rendered as symbols of wealth and death, Havekost conveys these ideas through the presentation of an empty display unit. Set against a dense black backdrop, Havekost paints his shelves with the harsh dead light of department store showcases; glamour without product becomes a discomforting void. The lighting effect of the horizontal shelves carries the optical illusion of movement, as if this exhibition of nothingness is speeding past in continuum.
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Eberhard Havekost
Zelte II

1998

Oil on Canvas

183 x 140cm
Eberhard Havekost often paints series of repetitive images to replicate the serial change of visual effect in nature. In Zelte II, Havekost captures an idyllic view of an apartment block bathed in sunshine; it’s a transitory moment, a fragile instance of sublimity in the constant movement of light. Monumentalised in scale and enhanced through intensity of colour, Havekost fixes this phenomenon in space and time. Like finding the perfect film still in 24 hours of footage, Havekost isolates the defining climax. Through capturing the instantaneous his paintings resonate with an intense anticipation, frozen on the periphery of expectant flux.

ARTICLES

Eberhard Havekost at Anton Kern
By Stephanie Cash, Art in America, Dec 2000

The houses that Dresden artist Eberhard Havekost paints, generic as they are, derive a certain appeal from their simplification to near abstraction. In his second New York show, he presented 14 paintings (all 1999), some recently seen at the Galerie fur Zeitgenossische Kunst in Leipzig, that range from distinctly representational to abstractly realistic. With two exceptions that include a single figure, the paintings are variations on a theme--views of the same three or four houses, each painted from a slightly different angle, surrounded by a few trees. The houses are without distinction or personality, and Havekost further reduces them to pure form. He often frames the image so that we see only a corner of a house or a half-hidden detail of the facade, such as a window with a tree in front of it. It's not that Havekost teases form out of abstraction; he accurately renders scenes in abstract ways. These are German homes, although they could just as easily be average suburban homes in almost any corner of this country. They're tidy, but not fussy, just like Havekost's painting style. Read the entire article
Source: (/www.findarticles.com)Eberhard Havekost Exhibition "Prints and Paintings 1996-2005" opens at the Embassy Residence Gallery 15 September 2005A private view, hosted by Ambassador Thomas Matussek and Mrs. Ursula Matussek marked the opening of the new exhibition in the Gallery of the Residence of the German Ambassador on Thursday 15 September 2005, "Prints and Paintings 1996-2005" by the Dresden artist Eberhard Havekost. Mrs. Ursula Matussek thanked the curator, Dr. Peter Plameyer, the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden, and the Ostschsische Sparkasse Dresden in her address for lending the works to the Gallery for three weeks.

Eberhard Havekost is a young artist from Dresden, who is rapidly gaining an international reputation. The exhibition features a wide range of works, including three large paintings entitled "The Saxon Switzerland" and several series of prints.

Eberhard Havekost (born 1967 in Dresden) is one of Saxony's best known young painters whose clinically cool works inspired by modern media have earned him an international reputation. The current exhibition in London of his prints and paintings includes works from the Dresden State Art Collection as well as three large-scale views of the sandstone hills along the River Elbe from the collection of the Ostschsische Sparkasse Dresden.

Read the entire article
Source: german-embassy.org.uk