•  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
30th anniversary
Saatchi Store
Current Exhibition

EXHIBITED AT THE SAATCHI GALLERY

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Emily Prince
American Servicemen and Women Who Have Died in Iraq and Afghanistan (But Not Including the Wounded, Nor the Iraqis nor the Afghanis)

2004 - to present

Pencil on colour coated vellum. Project comprised of 5,213 drawings

Each image: 4 x 3 in. Dimensions variable
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Emily Prince
Benjamin Ashley Independence, Missouri Date of death: May 24, 2007

2004

Pencil on colour coated vellum

10.2 x 7.6 cm
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Emily Prince
Andre D. Tyson Riverside, California Date of death: April 22, 2007

2004

Pencil on colour coated vellum

10.2 x 7.6 cm
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Emily Prince
Michael J. Jaurique Texas City, Texas Date of death: May 26, 2007

2004

Pencil on colour coated vellum

10.2 x 7.6 cm
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Emily Prince
Jason Morales La Puente, California Date of death: April 18, 2007

2004

Pencil on colour coated vellum

10.2 x 7.6 cm
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Emily Prince
Steven J. Walberg Paradise, California Date of death: April 15, 2007

2004

Pencil on colour coated vellum

10.2 x 7.6 cm
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Emily Prince
Katie Marie Soenksen Davenport, Iowa Date of death: May 2, 2007

2004

Pencil on colour coated vellum

10.2 x 7.6 cm
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Emily Prince
Johnny Villareal Mata,Pecos Texas Date of death: March 23, 2003

2004

Pencil on colour coated vellum

10.2 x 7.6 cm
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Emily Prince
American Servicemen and Women Who Have Died in Iraq and Afghanistan (But Not Including the Wounded, Nor the Iraqis nor the Afghanis)

2004

Pencil on colour coated vellum. Project comprised of 5,213 drawings

Each image: 4 x 3 in. Dimensions variable
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Emily Prince
Vitrine: American Servicemen and Women Who Have Died in Iraq and Afghanistan (But Not Including the Wounded, Nor the Iraqis nor the Afghanis)

2004

Mixed media

Dimensions variable
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Emily Prince
American Servicemen and Women Who Have Died in Iraq and Afghanistan (But Not Including the Wounded, Nor the Iraqis nor the Afghanis)

2004 - to present

Pencil on colour coated vellum Project comprised of approximately 5,213 drawings

Each image: 4 x 3 in. Dimensions variable

ARTICLES

At Venice Biennale, art that murmurs rather than shouts

After the artists, dealers, critics and hedge fund guys jetted off last weekend to shop in Basel and check out Documenta, the big show in Germany, it became easier to tell whether the 52nd version of the Venice Biennale was really as much of a bore as it seemed.

It's not. Quite. It's subtle and sober. And yes, maybe it's just a little boring.

But it can grow on you. What's always glorious about this oldest of the international festivals - aside, of course, from the simple fact that it's here (passing disappointments of art somehow wafting away on the sea breezes) - is its unruliness. It's an Italian thing. This means there is never really just one biennale but many of them, all mixed up, and you're free to like or kvetch about any or all of them.

A commissioner - this time, the former Museum of Modern Art curator, Robert Storr - deals with the crazy bureaucracy and is responsible for the main exhibition. As in the past, that show divides itself between the Italian Pavilion in the Giardini Publici, the biennale's traditional base, and the Arsenale, the former rope factory nearby, whose traversal, even when everything is as compulsively well-ordered as it is now, invariably feels like a forced march.

Read the entire article here
Source: oneintheother.com



Biennale Reflected on empires old and new

VENICE-Paradise Lost is the ideal name for an exhibit in "the first Roma Pavilion" in the 110-year history of the Venice Biennale. It's a lonely place now that the art world's movers and shakers have moseyed on in their grand tour of European contemporary art hot spots, or have simply dragged themselves back home, exhausted.

For one thing, the pavilion � actually the grimy Palazzo Pisani, a vast pile of weathered stone nearly lost in labyrinthine back alleys � represents a fiction. With its collection of artists from eight European democracies, Paradise Lost is an exhibition, angry and hugely alive, of a boundary-defying culture, "otherwise known as Gypsy," as a spokesperson explains. Like, what paradise? "Imagine," goes a pamphlet available at the door, "you board a bus and all the other passengers grab onto their wallet(s)."

Read the entire article here
Source: thestar.com