Feng Zhengjie

Selected works by Feng Zhengjie

Feng Zhengjie
Chinese Portrait L Series 2006 No.10

2006

Oil on canvas

210 x 300 cm
Reminiscent of Warhol’s screen printed celebrities, Feng’s paintings reflect a vision of futuristic pop. His generic portraits of women are influenced by promotional imagery: their exotic colours, electrified auras, and wind machine hair exude the glamour aesthetic of commodified desire. Feng appropriates these staples of western kitsch as a readymade lingo for a duplicity of ideology. His work is often discussed as capitalist critique, his empty eyed models posing as frivolous and vacant signifiers. Neither western nor Chinese in appearance, Feng’s femmes fatales are a super-hybrid of commercial beauty, a science fiction product of globalisation.
Painted in massive scale, Feng’s canvases replicate the billboards from which they were inspired. Without text, or accompanying products, Feng’s paintings streamline their hard-sell ethos. Removing all distraction, he exposes the essence of temptation, magnifying the sex appeal of fantasy lifestyle and its gulf of intangibility. Transposing these disposable sentiments through his highly refined painting technique, Feng glorifies the allure of advertising as epic, enduring, and numbingly empty.
Feng Zhengjie
Chinese Portrait L Series 2006 No. 11

2006

Oil on canvas

210 x 300 cm
Reminiscent of Warhol’s screen printed celebrities, Feng’s paintings reflect a vision of futuristic pop. His generic portraits of women are influenced by promotional imagery: their exotic colours, electrified auras, and wind machine hair exude the glamour aesthetic of commodified desire. Feng appropriates these staples of western kitsch as a readymade lingo for a duplicity of ideology. His work is often discussed as capitalist critique, his empty eyed models posing as frivolous and vacant signifiers. Neither western nor Chinese in appearance, Feng’s femmes fatales are a super-hybrid of commercial beauty, a science fiction product of globalisation.

Painted in massive scale, Feng’s canvases replicate the billboards from which they were inspired. Without text, or accompanying products, Feng’s paintings streamline their hard-sell ethos. Removing all distraction, he exposes the essence of temptation, magnifying the sex appeal of fantasy lifestyle and its gulf of intangibility. Transposing these disposable sentiments through his highly refined painting technique, Feng glorifies the allure of advertising as epic, enduring, and numbingly empty.
Feng Zhengjie
Chinese Portrait P Series 2006 No. 01

2006

Oil on canvas

300 x 400cm
Feng Zhengjie
Chinese Portrait P Series 2006 No. 02

2006

Oil on canvas

300 x 400cm
Feng Zhengjie
China Series No.3

2006

Oil on canvas

Reminiscent of Warhol’s screen printed celebrities, Feng’s paintings reflect a vision of futuristic pop. His generic portraits of women are influenced by promotional imagery: their exotic colours, electrified auras, and wind machine hair exude the glamour aesthetic of commodified desire. Feng appropriates these staples of western kitsch as a readymade lingo for a duplicity of ideology. His work is often discussed as capitalist critique, his empty eyed models posing as frivolous and vacant signifiers. Neither western nor Chinese in appearance, Feng’s femmes fatales are a super-hybrid of commercial beauty, a science fiction product of globalisation.
Painted in massive scale, Feng’s canvases replicate the billboards from which they were inspired. Without text, or accompanying products, Feng’s paintings streamline their hard-sell ethos. Removing all distraction, he exposes the essence of temptation, magnifying the sex appeal of fantasy lifestyle and its gulf of intangibility. Transposing these disposable sentiments through his highly refined painting technique, Feng glorifies the allure of advertising as epic, enduring, and numbingly empty.

Articles

Feng Zhengjie


Feng Zhengjie paints striking contemporary women. With their coloured hair, richly hued clothes and luscious, expressive lips, the women appear irresistibly dazzling. And yet, the wandering expressions in their eyes render them elusive and enigmatic.

These strange, unknowable eyes have become Feng's signature style.

Feng studied to MA level at the Fine Art education department of the Sichuan Academy of Fine Art between 1988 and 1995. After 1989, Feng rejected both socialist realism and Western academic art, turning instead to the questions raised by China's emerging contemporary art scene. He developed a more critical outlook with regards to society.

In response to the new issues confronting China, Feng Zhengjie decided to take inspiration from the popular images he had grown up with in rural Sichuan.

Critics are unanimous in placing Feng's paintings in the realm of the critique of contemporary consumer society; this was especially clear in the "Romantic Trip" series, which pictured young couples in the expensive wedding ceremonies now fashionable amongst certain sections of Chinese society. Read the entire article here Source: www.redmansion.co.uk

Under The Skin Beyond The Eyes
Feng Zhengjie's Portraits By Eleonora Battiston
I stare at Feng Zhengjie's works and observe images of men and women as portrayed directly or created by the artist's mind. A slideshow of glances, many and varied , of people that seem to be passing in and out of view, passing fast through the life and the canvases of the artist.

I look at them and they seem to be looking at me too, or looking at each other and suddenly seeming alive, even if at the same time the plain forms and exaggerated colors give the impression of the unreal. Their eyes change and follow the artist's transformations that, year by year, with different thoughts, look towards and within his country's history and culture. Shunned gazes intimate hidden secrets; the girls in the series "Butterfly in Love" avoid eye contact conspicuously.

Malicious and mischievous are the glances that seem to cross only in the series "Romantic Trip"; these fleeting looks reflect games played by young couples for whom the sole possible form of communication is loving attraction. Sparkles are covered by large sunglasses in the case of the "humanoids" which are the subject of the series "Coolness": characters are portrayed with naked bodies and big heads, bald and posed in the attitude of a famous movie star, looking similar to extraterrestrials that study our behavior whilst at the same time mocking us.

Side-eyed and distorted, characters seem undecided and unable of choosing where to go in the series "China" and "Portrait". They never look directly; they avoid confrontation with an auteur that hides fears and insecurities.

Read the entire article
Source: www.damianieditore.it