•  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
Saatchi Art
Saatchi Store
Current Exhibition

EXHIBITED AT THE SAATCHI GALLERY

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Fergal Stapleton
And A Door Opened.3.

2007

Black perspex, electrical fittings, red lightbulbs, polystyrene, concrete hardcore, wood cabling

130 x 66 x 54 cm
These sculptures by Fergal Stapleton trigger a certain range of half-recognitions: DIY science fiction props; orreries assembled from hi-fi store kit parts; minor events at Earth’s orbital margin. Their precision and impoverishment are exactly what make them so astoundingly magical: each one embodies a universe. Inside their dark Perspex enclosures amongst the loops of electrical cable, sit two or three modest items – a concrete chunk, a Styrofoam disc, and other matter found or made, some of it revolving perpetually, slowly under red light-bulbs, creating wondrous parallel microcosms from humble materials.
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Fergal Stapleton
And A Door Opened.6.

2007

Black perspex, electrical fittings, red lightbulbs, polystyrene, concrete hardcore, wood cabling

130 x 66 x 54 cm
Stapleton’s varied practice (including painting and sculpture) is bound by a concern with elucidating various phases of the fictive, the apparent and the real. His And A Door Opened assemblages, holding in equilibrium the fantastical with the blunt actualities of junk, exemplify this in their reordering of things known, producing new and surprising value out of meagre means. The red-black glow emanating from the dark vitrines, reminiscent of photographic darkrooms, gives the effect of an image half-developed, caught between latency and realisation.
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Fergal Stapleton
And A Door Opened.6. (detail)

2007

Black perspex, electrical fittings, red lightbulbs, polystyrene, concrete hardcore, wood cabling

130 x 66 x 54 cm

ARTICLES

Time Out: Fergal Stapleton: And a Door Opened, Carl Freedman Gallery, 30 May – 14 July 2007
By JJ Charlesworth

Sculpture doesn’t have an easy ride in a culture that much prefers images in two dimensions, and loves objects whose meanings are obvious. That’s why so many sculptures today are merely dumb stage-props waiting to have their picture taken. Fergal Stapleton’s excellent show And a Door Opened bucks the trend, with sculptures and paintings that produce a rare insight into the difference between images and objects, and how mere junk changes into art.

Five black plinths each support a darkly transparent case, made of light-absorbing deep red Perspex. Inside, one can dimly see lit light-bulbs, whose red gloom barely illuminates various arrangements of slow turning turn-tables, pats of formless plaster or concrete, and other visually minimal oddments. They’re inches away, but seem to inhabit a distant, unattainably parallel universe. Loops of light-bulb flex pass in and out of the cases, reminding you of the DIY-store origins of their contents, while reinforcing the sense of rupture between the world outside and the strange and surprising visual intangibility of what lies within. It’s a weird and captivating experience.

Stapleton is an often overlooked talent, his humorous curiosity regarding how ordinary things become ‘art’ often eclipsed by the raucous posturing of his YBA contemporaries. Compared with the tired bombast of Damien Hirst’s animal vitrines up the road at White Cube – pictures masquerading as objects – these extraordinary experiments in material transfiguration show how sculptural poetry is still alive and well. As an aside, Stapleton presents a suite of dark little paintings of money – notes and loose change – whose wispy insubstantiality makes you unsure as to whether the paintings should be worth more or less than their subject-matter. Stapleton’s great skill lies in showing how art works in the reordering of things known, producing new, unexpected value out of the slightest of means.


Read the entire article here
Source: blog.jjcharlesworth.com