Francesca DiMattio

Selected works by Francesca DiMattio

Francesca DiMattio
Sevres vase à Bobèches

2012

Overglaze and underglaze with gold lustre on porcelain

57.2 x 52.1 x 30.5 cm
Francesca DiMattio
Confection

2015

Underglaze, glaze, gold and silver luster on porcelain and stoneware, epoxy, enamel

148.6 x 73.7 x 69.9 cm
Francesca DiMattio
Ladder

2006

Oil on canvas

304.8 x 210.8 cm

Francesca DiMattio’s canvases take architecture as their subject as a means to restructure the concept of space. Using painting as a springboard for invention, DiMattio’s buildings and interiors descend into a myriad of perspectival confusion as grid-like patterns of brick and tile, decorative arches, and off kilter staircases become departure points for painterly contrasts and expressive mark-making. Occupying human-sized scale, DiMattio’s canvases create a dizzying sense of physical environment. Veering between art historical references – from pop, art nouveau, and op art – DiMattio’s paintings extend post-modern eclecticism into the realm of the surreal.
In Ladder, DiMattio envisions a still-life within a classical portico which dissolves into an entanglement of illusory confusion. DiMattio adapts the systematic order of black and white illustration as a means to underscore the subtle disruption of her composition. Painted objects, such as the ladder and umbrella, become embedded within the stylised background, their realistic rendering careening against the flatness of the picture plane as they are engulfed by the Matisse-like wall paper and threatened by the undulating floor.
DiMattio’s Broken Arch appropriates the staidness of her architectural subject to explore the visual representation of velocity and weightlessness. Juxtaposing the rigid geometry of mosaic-like forms against an explosion of feather motifs, bijoux patterning, and skewed linear shapes, DiMattio creates a sense of wonder and unease from an arrangement of formal elegance. Infusing the free flow meander of doodling with baroque opulence, DiMattio contrives an optical illusion through both disjointed perspective and a heightened physicality of surface detail.

Francesca DiMattio
Broken Arch

2006

Oil on canvas

304.8 x 210.8 cm
Francesca DiMattio
Tunnel

2007

Oil and acrylic on canvas(5 panels)

Overall dimensions 284.5 x 914.4 cm Each panel 284.5 x 182.9 cm

Francesca DiMattio’s canvases take architecture as their subject as a means to restructure the concept of space. Using painting as a springboard for invention, DiMattio’s buildings and interiors descend into a myriad of perspectival confusion as grid-like patterns of brick and tile, decorative arches, and off kilter furnishings become departure points for painterly contrasts and expressive mark-making.


Executed as a grandiose tableau, DiMattio’s Tunnel creates a dizzying sense of physical environment, envisioning a virtual reality in real-life scale. Veering between art historical references – from pop, art nouveau, and op art – DiMattio’s paintings extend post-modern eclecticism into the realm of the surreal


Articles

MY STYLE, FRANCESCA DIMATTIO:THE ARTIST GIVES US A PEEK AT HER OFFBEAT-CHIC STYLE
Jan 27 2010, by Christine Barberich, Refinery 29

Last November, we happened to be running around Miami's Design District when we bumped into artist Francesca DiMattio who was setting up for her show at Locust Projects. And while her soaring abstracts practically took our breath away, we were equally taken by the painter's iconoclastic style. Clad in a black jumpsuit, Acne-style wedges, and her signature braided up-do (think a modern Frida Kahlo), we knew there was plenty more good fashion sense where that came from. Lucky us, the lovely Francesca--who has shows in Milan, Chicago, and Boston already slated for 2010--lives and works right here in NYC. And her home reveals an equally cool clash of hand-painted objects, flea-market finds, and lots of art given to her and her artist husband, Garth Weiser, by friends. Double bonus: She even lets us in on how to get that atypical braided look (we might even practice it for Fashion Week).

How would you describe your personal style?
"My mom raised me exclusively on thrift stores as a little girl and taught me to look for new shapes and feel for quality fabrics. It's exciting for the eye to see something different, so I look for shapes that are not common. As a result I often find myself holding maternity wear, and clothes in my closet range from size 0-16. An outfit looks great when it's a little unfamiliar."

What are five key wardrobe pieces you find yourself wearing constantly?
1. "A little boy's Dior jacket that's now tattered from wear."
2. "Jumpsuits of all kinds. I have a big collection...all shapes and sizes."
3. " A collection of thick leather belts."
4. "I have an autumn color plaid wool pant-suit with elbow patches that I have worn once a year for the last 10 years."
5. "Chloé platform lace-up heels that I've had for six years."

Read the entire article here
Source: refinery29.com


FRANCESCA DIMATTIO TO CREATE NEW INSTALLATION FOR ICA'S WALL
Art Knowledge news

BOSTON, MA.- The Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston has commissioned New York-based painter Francesca DiMattio to create the fourth installation of the Sandra and Gerald Fineberg Art Wall. The Art Wall is dedicated to site-specific works by leading contemporary artists. DiMattio was inspired by the ICA’s striking building and location on Boston Harbor to create Banquet—a new, multi-panel painting of monumental scale. Located inside the museum’s glass-enclosed lobby, Banquet explores how the ICA’s architecture blurs our concept of interior and exterior space.
Unfolding across five canvases, Banquet offers a fantastical take on a waterfront scene: the sails of a tall ship intertwine with birds emerging from tiled walls and archways leading out to a stormy sea. On view from July 3, 2010 to Aug. 14, 2011, Sandra and Gerald Fineberg Art Wall: Francesca DiMattio is the artist’s first solo museum presentation.

“Francesca DiMattio is part of an exciting generation of artists who are taking painting in new directions,” says Jill Medvedow, Director of the Institute of Contemporary Art. “DiMattio’s use of perspective, scale and architectural imagery creates an exhilarating visual energy—a wonderful fit for the Sandra and Gerald Fineberg Art Wall, where visitors begin their experience at the ICA.”

DiMattio populates her paintings with an eclectic mix of geometric tiled floors, delicate lace, utilitarian ladders, and dramatic architectural elements. This disparate imagery is often woven together by underlying grid patterns, lending a sense of logic to her seemingly chaotic canvases. In her paintings, elements collide into each other, become entangled, and co-exist—complicating our understanding of perspective and space. Her work seems to exist somewhere in between the abstract and the figurative, the beautiful and the grotesque, between the processes of creation and destruction. DiMattio describes her working practice as “getting into trouble and getting out of it.”

“DiMattio’s source material ranges from high-end fashion and design magazines to images pulled from art history books, to pieces of furniture in her studio,” says ICA Curatorial Associate Bridget Hanson. “She combines, fragments, and deconstructs these objects into what could be considered a surreal, imaginary still-life. Painted mostly in black and white, DiMattio’s new work, Banquet, reveals glimpses of blue ocean and the Boston skyline through a fantasy tableau of chairs, tables, flower vases, and boat masts.”

Read the entire article here
Source: artknowledgenews.com


FRANCESCA DIMATTIO
Artist Pension Trust

Francesca DiMattio received a BFA from Cooper Union in New York in 2003 and an MFA from Columbia University in New York in 2005. Recent solo exhibitions include the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston, Banquet at Locust Projects in Miami, Salon 94 in New York, Unhinged at LAXART in Los Angeles and The Suburban in Illinois. She is represented by Salon 94 in New York. Francesca DiMattio lives and works in New York.
Francesca DiMattio’s canvasses begin with grids and architectural elements, as they expand to large-scale, complex abstractions. Her work is derived from fashion, design and art history with deconstructed elements that edge close to the surreal. The architectural framework allows DiMattio to explore space, velocity and weightlessness. The human-size works beckon viewers into their frenetic spaces and contrast the normalcy of the every day. Infused with a kinetic opulence, DiMattio’s work is defined by a sense of unease and painterly contrasts. She uses and departs from the strict rules of architecture, creating a world that could not exist on its own, but one with invigorating energy.

Read the entire article here
Source: aptglobal.org