•  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
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Current Exhibition

SELECTED WORKS BY Garth Weiser

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Garth Weiser
Baseboard Outlet

2006

Oil on canvas

228.6 x 304.8 cm
Garth Weiser’s paintings explore the nature of perception. Weiser’s process often begins by making a three dimensional model of an abstracted form as a ‘sketch’ or model from which to paint. Coating his canvases with thick impasto grids or relief outlines of his composition, Weiser underscores each painting with a textured foundation which enforces the illusionary elements of scale and perspective and the gives a mimetic quality of architectural space.

Using this blueprint of spatial order as a departure point for painterly invention, Weiser’s finished works disrupt and challenge visual expectation. Following the dictates of the underlying pattern, Weisher departs from the depictive ‘reality’ of still life to create mesmerising abstractions.


Enhancing the sense of three dimensional dept, striated bands of monochrome colour gain an ephemeral delicacy as liquidy hues gather within the bevelled creases of the under-painting, and tones are alternately deadened and intensified to create a heightened atmosphere of light; an effect designed for the purpose of interruption. Incorporating ultra-flat geometric shapes, irregularly angled lines, and organic motifs, Weiser readily confuses reality and illusion, forcing an optical confrontation between imaginary expanse and the tangible veritas of the picture plane.
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Garth Weiser
Something For The Weekend

2006

Oil on canvas

228.6 x 304.8 cm
Garth Weiser’s paintings explore the nature of perception. Weiser’s process with this body of work often begins by making a three dimensional model of an abstracted form as a ‘sketch’ or model from which to paint. Coating his canvases with thick impasto grids or relief outlines of his composition, Weiser underscores each painting with a textured foundation which enforces the illusionary elements of scale and perspective and the gives a mimetic quality of architectural space. Using this blueprint of spatial order as a departure point for painterly invention, Weiser’s finished works disrupt and challenge visual expectation. Following the dictates of the underlying pattern, Weiser departs from the depictive ‘reality’ of still life to create mesmerising abstractions.
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Garth Weiser
Mr. Bad Example

2007

Acrylic and oil on panel

266.7 x 210.8 cm
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Garth Weiser
Nude #4, Red Grid

2007

Oil and acrylic on canvas

276.8 x 210.8 cm

ARTICLES

Garth Weiser

Garth Weiser compresses and conflates figural, landscape, and geometric elements to create paintings which rest in an enigmatic point between abstraction and representation.

He mediates between the structure of an image and it's meaning. Pushing the discordant relationship between formalist rigidity and expressionistic liberty, he makes the fundamental components of image making the subject of his paintings. Each work begins with an impasto grid that acts as a scaffold upon which a figurative form is built.

Within this sub-structure, large rectangular shapes delineate colossal heads and torsos. Pattern is a volume and a flattened visual field. Color is used both as hue and substance. Illusionism is reduced to graphic models in some areas while it is conventionally rendered in others.

As the image is developed, residue from earlier decisions is retained creating a disruption in the organizational qualities of the painting's schematic origin.

This wounded, scarred surface suggests something buried underneath. In this way, Weiser creates a space that accommodates disparate readings. One involves the imaginative wanderings of figures bunkered down in layers of geometry while another is tied to paint as a material embossed upon the canvas.

In Always Down and In a coat of arms depicting the head of a beast emerges on the torso of the central form.

Rendered through directional brush marks that catch the light at certain angles, the coat of arms is hidden and revealed depending on the direction in which the painting is viewed. This baroque interlude creates a dynamic tension as the painting is pulled into a realm of symbols and iconography while its geometric space and tactile surface illustrate Weiser's formal appreciation of the medium.

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Source: guildgreyshkul.com