Selected works by Gedi Sibony

Gedi Sibony
Untitled

2008

Carpet, tape

305 x 107 cm

Gedi Sibony’s constructions draw from the traditions of minimalism in their pared down aesthetics and conception of sculpture as selfcontained conceptual objects. Unlike the highly polished works of artists such as Donald Judd or Ad Reinhardt, Sibony’s objects adopt an impoverished style and are often made from found materials such as cardboard, plastic sheeting, and wood. Through these media, which are associated with both construction and
debris, Sibony’s work elevates the humble qualities of everyday ‘stuff’ to create instances of poetic beauty. In Untitled, Sibony presents a strip of carpet mounted on the wall as a ready-made ‘painting’ picturing a geometric composition made from tape; through its delicate arrangement and tactile surface, Untitled seduces invested contemplation of its precarious form and physicality.

Gedi Sibony
That's Tall's Tale

2005

Plastic, tape

152.5 x 152.5 cm

In That’s Tall’s Tale, Sibony configures a ‘painting’ from plastic sheeting and packing tape, with the irregular shape of the ‘canvas’ drawing reference to artists such as Ellsworth Kelley and Frank Stella. By exposing exactly how the work was made, Sibony instigates a performative role for the artistic process, focusing attention on the subtle tensions within the composition and its very considered and sophisticated balance of form, materiality, and space. Through this intense scrutiny, Sibony affirms the authenticity of artistic integrity, positing a refined connoisseurship of, and heightened sensitivity to, visual tradition as an intrinsic and enduring value.

Gedi Sibony
Side Show, Side Show

2008

Wood

241 x 151 x 20 cm

In addition to minimalism, Sibony also cites inspiration from Robert Rauschenberg’s combines and Richard Tuttle’s post-minimalism in his synthesis of disparate media, and the arte povera movement in its approach to experimentation and mystical conception of the natural quality of materials. Side Show, Side Show is a deceptively simple arrangement of two wooden frames leaned against the wall, establishing a contingent relationship to both each other and the surrounding gallery architecture. Delineating empty space as a comparable field by which to measure the sculpture’s existence, Side Show, Side Show wittily hovers between ‘being’ and ‘nothingness’, exuding a quiet spiritual aura in its delicate self-assertion. Presented with understated elegance, the frames operate as both a form and its shadow, action and onsequence, a receptacle and echo of viewer perception.

Gedi Sibony
Untitled

2009

Plastic sheet, packing tape, ink

290 x 183 cm

Sibony’s Untitled is a monumental assemblage of plastic wrapping and packing tape. Its overwhelming scale magnifies its fragile physicality, making its precarious presence simultaneously awesome and embarrassed. At first glance Sibony’s piece seems happenstance, as if the packaging of a work had been hung, rather than the work itself. The brown tape however, forms a rough image of a canvas on an easel; sketched out on the clear tarpaulin, Sibony’s witty conceptual game challenges expectations of perception and demythologises the processes behind art production – from the laborious work in the studio to final exhibition - making the creative methodology quite literally transparent.

Gedi Sibony
Untitled

2009

Diptych, carpet, wood door painted in white

Carpet : 220 x 170 cm Door : 203 x 76 cm Overall dimensions : 220 x 270 cm

Juxtaposing a sheet of carpet and an unfitted door, Sibony’s Untitled dissembles ideas of both architectural space and the selfconscious flatness of colour-field painting. Recontextualised as formal devices, his common household furnishings are made alien and seductive, elevated from their functional familiarity to the status of pure aesthetic. As ‘readymade paintings’ they form a strange diptych, their cheap purpose-built textures become oddly possessing through their assertion of autonomy, creating a sense of the sublime through the ordinary fixtures of everyday life.


Articles

GEDI SIBONY: GALLERIA ZERO, MILAN
Reviewed by Andrew Berardini, ArtReview magazine on 23 May 2008

The unfinished walls, speckled and stained beneath the high ceiling and flood of natural light in the unfinished gallery space, give Gedi Sibony's deceptively simple sculptures, made of rough and simple materials, a perfect context. Each of the works, made of cut carpet, cardboard, Plexiglas, unfinished wood, black tape and sheets of plastic, seem like tiny poems whispered beneath the yawning ceiling, a prayer in a cathedral. Though the work in the space fills one with a quiet awe, the materials are far from religious, and I balk a bit in writing, however metaphorically, about their relationship with spirituality. If one were to take an economic view of them (their content, not their price), the strange beauty that's wrought from these simple materials would seem almost Marxist, but without any of the lip-smacking ideology (or its social realist tendencies). In the end, to talk about Sibony's work is to circle around different solutions, discarding each one as it passes as insufficient, not quite right.

Richard Tuttle seems an easy and immediate comparison, as the artists both work in similar materials in similar ways, dealing however obliquely with space. Tuttle, who lives in New Mexico, has cited the sprawling plains and big skies of the West as an influence on his work, something that can also be found in fellow New Mexico artist Bruce Nauman, whom some texts have noted as an inspiration for Sibony. But the spaces of Sibony's works are more like uneasy narratives than tableaux, portraits rather than landscapes. I would even evoke the more over-thetop and twisted work of Jonathan Pylypchuk as in a similar discomfort zone, though manifested in an entirely different form. Even in the wide-open space of Galleria Zero, Sibony's work seems like it has never shaken its true purpose, its ephemeral identity - to be used once, quickly, and then discarded.

The sheet of plastic stuck to the wall with bits of tape, irregularly cut cardboard shapes, a packing crate, all seem transitory, leftover junk from the last exhibition. But the quality of light and the distinct shapes of the objects really couldn't, after some contemplation, be anything but entirely intentional, no matter how seemingly abandoned. In some ways the works almost seem shy, their presence soft, forced to come to work for the slave master of art; these objects put on a good show, awkward and quiet. By not being anything but themselves, they transcend their low origins.

Source: artreview.com