Selected works by Grayson Perry

Grayson Perry
Saint Claire 37 wanks accross Northern Spain

2003

Earthenware

84 x 55 x 55 cm

Perry’s urns are rendered with an incomprehensible master-craft: their surfaces richly textured from designs marked into the clay, followed by intricately complicated glazing and photo-transfer techniques. Perry makes ceramic pots, hand-stitched quilts, and outrageous dress designs, creating a cosmopolitan folk-art.

Grayson Perry
Punters in the Snow

1999



40 x 25 x 25 cm

“We’re only here once and I want to get as much out of it possible. And as an artist, my job is to be as much "me" as possible.”

Grayson Perry
Barbaric Splendour

2003

Glazed ceramic

67 x 35 cm

His form and content is always incongruous: classic Greecian-like urns bearing friezes of car-wrecks, cell-phones, supermodels, as well as more dark and literary scenes often incorporating auto-biographical references.

Grayson Perry
We Are What We Buy

2000



50 x 22x 22 cm
Grayson Perry
Golden Ghosts

2000

Earthenware

65 x 39 x 39 cm
Unhappy expressions on the little girls’ faces in Golden Ghosts contrast sharply with the idyllic country cottages stenciled in the background. Perry often uses found images to create a mood or a tension – the exceptionally sad image of the seated girl is that of a child affected by the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station disaster. This evocative work hints at a familiarity with psychotherapy, made at a time when Perry was coming to terms with his own unhappy past. Perry’s transvestite alter ego, Claire, appears outlined in gold as the ghost in the title, dressed in the elaborate embroidered Coming Out Dress, made for a performance in 2000.
Grayson Perry
Cuddly Toys Caught on Barbed Wire

2001

Earthenware

55 x 38 x 38 cm

Perry reveals ‘One of the reasons I dress up as a woman is my low self-esteem, to go with the image of women being seen as second class…It is like pottery: that’s seen as a second-class thing too’.

Grayson Perry
Spirituality my Arse

1997



58 x 33 x 33 cm

These highly decorative objects, often covered with layers of lustre, gold leaf and sugary kitsch transfers are, by the artist´s own admission, ´perversion to match the curtains´.

Grayson Perry
Over the Rainbow

2001

Earthenware

53 x 41 cm

People say, ‘why do you need to put sex, violence or politics or some kind of social commentary into my work?’ Without it, it would be pottery. I think that crude melding of those two parts is what makes my work.”

Grayson Perry
We've Found the Body of Your Child

2000

Earthenware

49 x 30 x 30 cm

This has the preciousness of a well-travelled Russian antique. Glazed in golds, silvers and whites, Perry’s urn tells a Gothic tale of a child’s death in a gloomy small town. The image is timeless: it could be yesterday or eighty years ago; but almost certainly it has to be Eastern European – nowhere else could such horrific grief be met with such fairy-tale romanticism.

Grayson Perry
Whoring Grayson Perry Style

1997



85 x 36 x 36 cm

Grayson Perry’s urns are rendered with an incomprehensible master-craft: their surfaces richly textured from designs marked into the clay, followed by intricately complicated glazing and photo-transfer techniques.

Grayson Perry
Defenders of Childhood

2000

Earthenware

46 x 21 x 21 cm

Winner of the 2003 Turner Prize, British artist Grayson Perry creates seductively beautiful pots that convey challenging themes; at the heart of his practice is a passionate desire to comment on deep flaws within society. Perry uses pots as narrative and figurative media, a round, curved surface for a bizarre or bitter story.

Grayson Perry
Nostalgia for the Bad Times

1999



43 x 28 x 28 cm

"With ceramics, the purely decorative is its default position. But if you did a purely decorative painting, it’s still a painting but it’s within a context of contemporary art."

Grayson Perry
Transvestite Brides of Christ

2000

Earthenware

39 x 26 x 26 cm

These highly decorative objects, often covered with layers of lustre, gold leaf and sugary kitsch transfers are, by the artist´s own admission, ´perversion to match the curtains´.

Grayson Perry
Triumph of Innocence

2000

Earthenware

70 x 23 x 23 cm

Perry’s urns are rendered with an incomprehensible master-craft: their surfaces richly textured from designs marked into the clay, followed by intricately complicated glazing and photo-transfer techniques.

These highly decorative objects, often covered with layers of lustre, gold leaf and sugary kitsch transfers are, by the artist´s own admission, ´perversion to match the curtains´.

Grayson Perry
Troubled

2000



42 x 25 x 25 cm

“I’m not an innovator, ceramic-wise. I use very traditional forms, techniques and it’s merely the carrier of the message. That’s how I want to keep it. But I’m always aware that it’s a pot. It’s not like I take it for granted. I’m always aware that I’m working on a vase and what that means”

Grayson Perry
I Want to be an Artist

1996

Earthenware

66 x 42 x 42 cm

A master of the incongruous juxtaposition, Grayson Perry scrawls savage satirical messages alongside sentiments of nostalgia for lost innocence.

Grayson Perry
Moonlit Wankers

2001



66 x 35 x 35 cm

“If I did something purely decorative, and I’ve approached that line a few times where I’ve looked at pieces and thought, ‘That’s pretty’, but it’s like potatoes without salt. I can’t stomach it.”

Grayson Perry
Two Children Born on the Same Day

1996

Earthenware

42 x 30 x 30 cm

Grayson Perry often uses found images to create a mood or a tension

Grayson Perry
Saint, Satin, Satan

1999



45 x 28 x 28 cm

“In the past I’ve made more raw work that was more blatantly provocative and without so much of a social understanding of what I was doing. I think the fact that it was pottery diffused that.”

Grayson Perry
Cries of London

1996



56 x 26 x 26 cm

For Grayson Perry, this is an expression of an unrecoverable lost innocence. Pastiched with delft images of ladies in waiting, delicate flowers, teddy bears, and embossed tear-drop patterns, Perry creates a hallowed place where unhappy souls exist as golden shadows of the children they never got to be.

Grayson Perry
Contained Anger





36 x 24 x 24 cm
Inspired by Grayson Perry’s experiences as a transvestite, his ‘little girl’ vases hint at an autobiographical referencing: his penchant for wearing baby doll dresses, and the questions of male-role models and the development of his sexuality in his childhood.
Grayson Perry
I Hate You, I Hate Myself

2000



31 x 20 x 20 cm
The pots are covered in a kind of psychic collage replete with stark, expressionistic drawings, hand written text, stencilled lettering and photographs.
Grayson Perry
Driven Man

2000



39 x 31 x 31 cm
Grayson Perry uses pots as narrative and figurative media, a round, curved surface for a bizarre or bitter story.
Grayson Perry
Oiks, Tarts, Wierdoes and Contemporary Art

1996



70 x 38 x 38 cm
“I’ve never done anything that was consciously just purely decorative. There always has to be a snag in it somewhere. It’s almost the defining characteristic of my work.”
Grayson Perry
Language of Cars

1999



39 x 28 x 28 cm
His work incorporates art history and the art world, consumer culture, scenarios of kinky sex and allusions to violence as well as images of himself, his family and his transvestite alter ego Claire.
Grayson Perry
Posh Bastards House

1999



55 x 23 x 23 cm

"I'm not an innovator, ceramic-wise. I use very traditional forms, techniques and it's merely the carrier of the message. That's how I want to keep it. But I'm always aware that it's a pot. It's not like I take it for granted. I'm always aware that I'm working on a vase and what that means"

Grayson Perry
Poverty

2000



87 x 27 x 27 cm

“The art world is a funny little place. It is a weird foreign country where they speak a funny language and if you want to operate in that land you have to speak that language - which is why 'craft' people don't get it sometimes.”

Grayson Perry
Discreetly Branded

1999



57 x 28 x 28 cm

The forms of the pots may be traditional, but Grayson Perry resolutely distances himself from the typical cannon of artistic ceramics.

Grayson Perry
Boring Cool People





Whilst depicting scenes of child abuse, bondage and sadomasochism or a gathering of society´s finest ´boring cool people´, the works remain elegant and lavish. These highly decorative objects, often covered with layers of lustre, gold leaf and sugary kitsch transfers are, by the artist´s own admission, ´perversion to match the curtains´.

Grayson Perry
All Men are Bastards

2001



45 x 27 x 27 cm
Melding handicraft and consumer culture, his objects are luxury one-of-a-kinds with a Rodeo Drive chic.

Other Resources

artfacts.net
Additional information on Grayson Perry

the-artists.org
Additional resources on the artist Grayson Perry

ideasfactory.com
Top of the pots
Frocks and pots are a first for The Turner Prize, but don't expect decorative vases from transvestite potter and TP 2003 winner Grayson Perry. Trace Newton-Ingham got to him before the advancing press pack...

news.bbc.co.uk
Transvestite potter wins Turner
Pottery artist Grayson Perry, who creates vases depicting subjects like death and child abuse, has won this year's Turner Prize.
Perry accepted the award in a dress, as his female alter-ego Claire, thanked his wife and said he was "stunned".

absolutearts.com
Indepth Arts News: "Grayson Perry - Guerrilla Tactics"
Grayson Perry's work is almost unknown in The Netherlands. In England, on the other hand, the public are already widely acquainted with his provocative pots, by way of the Saatchi 'New Labour' exhibition last year, and others.

smh.com
It gets weirder for the Queen
Grayson Perry in the frock he wore to the palace: "I don't think she could believe her eyes when she saw me."
The Queen's eyes almost popped out of her head.
Never before had she come face-to-face at Buckingham Palace with a drag queen.

tate.org.uk
Turner Prize History
Grayson Perry
Shortlisted: 2003
Perry creates seductively beautiful pots to convey challenging themes: at the heart of his practice is a passionate desire to comment on deep flaws within society.

tate.org.uk
Turner Prize 2003
Grayson Perry wins the Turner Prize 2003
The Turner Prize 2003 was awarded to Grayson Perry. The £20,000 prize was presented by the artist Sir Peter Blake.
Grayson Perry was shortlisted for his exhibitions at the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, and the Barbican Art Gallery, London.

Tate.org.uk
2003 Turner Prize winner, from the Tate Gallery.
Grayson Perry (winner) was born in Chelmsford in 1960. He studied at Braintree College of Further Education and at Portsmouth Polytechnic.

guardian.co.uk
Top of the pots
Turner nominee Grayson Perry's first artwork was a plate depicting a crucifixion, called Kinky Sex. His new pottery features child abuse. Weird? You haven't met his alter ego Claire yet. By Stuart Jeffries.

elegraph.co.uk
Transvestite's shocking pots claim victory in Turner Prize
Grayson Perry, a transvestite potter with a strong line in pornographic and paedophile imagery, won the Turner Prize yesterday.
Perry, 43, accepted the £20,000 prize at a dinner at Tate Britain last night dressed in a little-girl frock with his blond hair brushed up as his female alter ego, Claire.

petticoated.com
Congratulations Grayson Perry
It would be impossible not to write something in this issue about Grayson Perry, the winner of the 2003 Turner Prize for art, because he accepted the award wearing a "little girl" style frock, petticoats, lacy ankle socks and red Mary Jane shoes. A few readers have sent me web sites with the news of the prize.
That Grayson is a cross dresser who enjoys dressing as a little girl is important, but the win has highlighted other issues as well, which I personally believe to be even more important.

transgenderzone.com - Transgender zone explore the world of Turner Prize winner Grayson Perry
Grayson Perry's first artwork was a plate depicting a crucifixion, called Kinky Sex. It's time you met his alter ego Claire!
Grayson Perry was born in Chelmsford, Essex, in 1960. He studied Fine Art at Portsmouth Polytechnic and learnt pottery at evening classes. Perry's use of craft in his work comments on issues of taste in art as well as other cultural and moral values.

telegraph.co.uk
My week: Grayson Perry, artist
Inside the day-to-day life of Britain's cultural movers and shakers
Monday
First off, I did Start the Week with Andrew Marr on Radio 4, then it was over to the gallery to hang the show. It's my first since winning the Turner Prize last year so I've been a bit nervous. Later I went to the opening of Bruce Nauman's installation in the Tate Turbine Hall. I've never been a big fan of his. It's often said he's "austere". I think that's a euphemism for "quite lazy". It looks like a piece of work he's done by phone.

findarticles.com
How do I look? by Caroline Wingfield
MOST PEOPLE react with wonder. But I think they're also disarmed that I'm wearing my subconscious on my sleeve, literally. It's like a little puppy that rolls over and shows its tummy, people can't feel aggressive towards that. A lot of people think if they expose themselves they're going to be vulnerable, in fact I've found the opposite; I've found people are much more friendly.

ceramicstoday.com
Grayson Perry, British ceramist, visual artist & writer.
In the early 1980s Grayson Perry was a member of the Neo-Naturist group, participating in performance and film works. He has continued to make work in a variety of media which now include embroidery and photography