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    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
Saatchi Art
Saatchi Store
Current Exhibition

SELECTED WORKS BY Hayley Newman

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Hayley Newman
B(in)

1996

Photograph

39 x 39 cm
Sitting in a bin bag waiting for bin men to pick me up in New York. When the bin men arrived at 4pm, I jumped out of the bag and ran home.
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Hayley Newman
Blow Out

1997

Photograph

91 x 92.5 cm
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Hayley Newman
Crying Glasses (An Aid to Melancholia)

1995

Photograph

50 x 40 cm
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Hayley Newman
Head

1997

Photograph

91 x 92.5 cm
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Hayley Newman
Human Resources

1998

Photograph

102 x 103 cm
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Hayley Newman
I Spy Surveillance Fly

1994

Photograph

38.5 x 38.5 cm
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Hayley Newman
Lock-Jaw Lecture Series

1997-8

Photograph

45.5 x 36 cm
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Hayley Newman
Meditation on Gender Difference

1996

Photograph

40 x 27 cm
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Hayley Newman
Spirit

1995

Photograph colour ink jet print

58.5 x 83 cm
Soho, London
Dressed as a ghost for Halloween I ran into various pubs in London's Soho, stole a drink and then left.
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Hayley Newman
You Blew My Mind

1998

Black and white photograph

91 x 92.5 cm

ARTICLES

“Hayley Newman”, review for Frieze Magazine by Peter Suchin

Hayley Newman’s first solo show at a major international venue worked as a reminder of the written word’s immense influence on the reception and interpretation of works of art. The exhibition at first appeared to be the visual record of a large number of her own performance works. Presented as a display of neatly framed photographs complete with captions detailing titles, dates, venues and related information, ‘Connotations - Performance Images 1994-98’ (1998) and ‘Connotations I’ (2002), the latter constructed especially for the exhibition, allegedly documented some 40 live art actions carried out in diverse locations over a period of several years. A careful inspection of the earlier anthology revealed, however, that these ‘captured actions’ were all in fact staged during a single week in 1998, and recorded not by a range of on-location photographers but by a solo collaborator, Casey Orr.

Each photograph in Connotations - Performance Images 1994-98 represented a single work, with the adjacent caption succinctly describing what had supposedly taken place. We see what we are told is Newman dressed as a ghost in a Soho pub or wearing special ‘crying glasses’ while travelling on public transport, a crack in a wall caused by a PA system blaring out at high volume, thousands of small plastic bags filled with the artist’s own breath, and a sponge jammed in the door of the artist’s studio. These and other such ‘works’ point to the fact that the history of performance art is in large measure constructed through individual, iconic images of now classic actions or events, together with their reproduction in catalogues, magazines and books. In some cases Newman references performances by seminal figures such as Chris Burden or Robert Filliou, as though restaging them for an in-the-know audience of experts or critics. The prose employed similarly alludes to the deadpan, matter-of-fact writing style used by Burden when assembling his own archival material.

Read the entire article here
Source: http://www.frieze.com