Selected works by Ida Ekblad

Ida Ekblad
The L, The LL, The Lapis Lazuli

2010

Cast concrete, pigment, found objects

120 x120 x 5 cm

Ida Ekblad’s chance-based art practice is a literal reflection of her peripatetic methodology, a special kind of no-holds-barred urban folk art. The production of her sculptures, paintings, music and poetry revolves around ‘drifts’ taken around the cities in which she will be making the work. Like a scavenger on a mission to extract essential, survival sustenance out of the discarded remains of contemporary culture, Ekblad collects materials on her walks, sifting through piles of rubble from demolished buildings and industrial heaps of metal.

Ida Ekblad
Dubbed

2010

Concrete, found objects

110 x 90 cm
Ida Ekblad
Night Ocean Return Without And Without Hesitate

2010

Mixed media, concrete

144 x 123 cm
Her resulting works are exquisitely vibrant, free-associative compositions pairing dissonance with visual inventiveness. She displays a prodigious and playful imagination, referencing the visual language of fellow ‘drifters’, the Situationists or the expressionism of CoBrA painters such as Asger Jorn.
Ida Ekblad
Banging

2010

Mixed media

110 x 95 cm
Ida Ekblad
Dusty Dry On The Tongue Swallowed Some

2010

Mixed materials

150 x 100 cm

Some of her works, such as Banging, Dubbed, The L, The LL, The Lapis Lazuli, Night Ocean Return Without and Without Hesitate (all 2010), could almost be called concrete poems - collected refuse objects have been literally embedded into wet panels of the material, finished with an inscription of the artist’s initials at the bottom, nodding to mark-making on actual street art. Similarly, in her sculpture Untitled (2010) discarded scraps of metal have been planted in a concrete pedestal. The heaviness of these pieces contrasts with the delicacy and refined balance of Figurine with Horns, Tennessee Hills and Organ Invention (all 2010), abstract shapes that somehow find completion in the artist’s ambiguous titles.

Ida Ekblad
To Drink A Glass Of Melted Snow

2010

Oil on canvas

203.5 x 163.5 cm
Ida Ekblad
Missing Pages

2010

Oil on canvas

160 x 130 cm
Ida Ekblad
Organ Invention

2010

Welded steel

190 x 210 x 120 cm
Ida Ekblad
Figurine With Horns

2010

Cast concrete, found objects

265 x 100 x 60 cm
There is something sci-fi and post-apocalyptic about Ekblad’s embrace and presentation of what is essentially humanity’s waste. Equally, there’s an explosive sense of future-retro abstract centripetal release, seen for example in Stalk Gills And Caps Of Goodbye (2009), Dusty Dry On The Tongue Swallowed Some and To Drink A Glass Of Melted Snow (both 2010).
‘Painting to me combines expressions of rhythm, poetry, scent, emotion..... It offers ways to articulate the spaces between words, and I cannot be concerned with its death, when working at it makes me feel so alive.’
Ida Ekblad
Tennessee Hills

2010

Welded steel, found object

252 x 72 x 20 cm
Ida Ekblad
Loops

2010

Cast concrete and steel

134 x 82 x 62 cm
Ida Ekblad
Stalk Gills and Caps of Goodbye

2007

Oil on canvas

140 x 560 cm

Other Resources

artfacts.net
Additional information and images – Ida Ekblad

artnet.com
Various other resources and images – Ida Ekblad

ida-ekblad.com
The artist’s website – various images

nourbakhsch.de
Galerie Giti Nourbakhsch, Berlin – Solo show 13th March – 24th April 2010

gaudeldestampa.com
Information about Ida Ekblad’s work at Guadel de Stampa Gallery, Paris

alessandrodemarch.it


Galleria Alessandro de March, Milan


pastwillywonkainc.wordpress.com
Willy Wonka Inc – Representing gallery, Oslo

artforum.com
Video of Ida Ekblad’s “In Exile From The Mineral Kingdom”

friezeartfair.com
Ida Ekblad’s work trips you up on the world’s cultural baggage with wit and irony. American youth culture is a frequent reference, notably in Untitled (M) (2008), a stolen McDonald’s sign reworked with ink and bleach on paper, and Political Song for Jessica Simpson to Sing (2006), a détourné poster of the starlet with a globule of bubblegum piratically obscuring her right eye. An eclipsed infatuation with Americana, loved and loathed from northern European shores, seems to underpin her practice, although recent work suggests her focus has shifted back home.

idiommag.com
The Journal Gallery in Williamsburg is presenting Norwegian artist Ida Ekblad’s first U.S. solo exhibition, Salty Sap Green Black, which opened just days before Europäisch-Amerikanische Freundschaft, a three-person show at Gavin Brown’s Enterprise. Ekblad’s work in the two shows, though markedly different, is certainly supplementary. Ironically, it is only her sizable sculptures that are on view at the Journal Gallery, a tiny space on North 1st Street, while Gavin Brown’s immense Greenwich Street space in Manhattan includes her paintings alongside her sculpture.

norway.org
The Journal Gallery in Brooklyn, NY, presents Salty Sap Green Black, Ida Ekblad`s first U.S. solo exhibition. Ekblad (born 1980) is an artist currently living and working in Oslo, Norway. Her sculptural works: The Gold Bug Drift (NYC) are based on "drifts" in a given city, for Salty Sap Green Black the city is New York. Like William Legrand in Edgar Allen Poe`s The Gold Bug, Ekblad has been bitten by a bug that has led her onto a path of unexpected undertakings; a form of modern day piracy. The gems and treasures gleaned from her "drifts"
are laid to rest in vessels of concrete at the time of discovery and carried around the city in the course of production until her sculptures are achieved. The resulting works thus becoming the poetic attestations of her performative actions, unlike the "drift" itself, which Ekblad describes as the unequivocal treasure, the act of deconstructing habits of experiencing and discovering an area or a city.

interviewmagazine.com
In the case of Norwegian artists Nils Bech and Ida Ekblad, collaboration is more of a friendship between two people whose fitful lives never stop being art. Take their exhibition in Switzerland last June, at an off-site gallery during Art Basel: Ekblad, 29, soaped the storefront with colorful, expressionistic swipes of paint, effectively boarding up the windows; at the opening, Bech, a 28-year-old camp performance artist with teen idol looks, sang a rendition of the operatic pop song “Curious Love” over a mix of choral chants and synthesizers. For Ekblad, this piece was a bridge between her earlier political works (her stamps of the McDonald’s logo were on view at the New Museum’s Younger Than Jesus show in New York last spring) and her more recent sculptural and painterly abstractions.