Selected works by Jackie Saccoccio

Jackie Saccoccio
Curtain

2011

Oil and mica on linen

213.4 x 182.9 cm
It is perhaps her interest in representations of the epic, natural American landscape, combined with the expressive freedom found in post-war abstraction, that gives Saccoccio’s paintings a unique light and a pictorial depth that is particularly uncommon and difficult to categorise.
Jackie Saccoccio
Portrait (Perspective)

2012

Oil and mica on linen

274.3 x 243.8 cm

Saccoccio’s Portrait series combines numerous contrasting styles of application from drips and blurs to spills and smudges; a built up maze of overlapping colour and marks makes it difficult to know where one layer ends and the next begins. The further they travel from their original, representational source the more they take on their own material presence; a visual dance emerges between painting styles and mark making from throughout art history that Saccoccio has blended together but deftly avoided blending in.

Jackie Saccoccio
Portrait (Reverse)

2012

Oil and mica on linen

213.4 x 182.9 cm

So, while her final works can contain up to 50 layers of paint, they retain a harmonious balance between the seriousness of painting and an incredible, ethereal airiness that she describes as “maybe celestial or spiritual; definitely transcendent”.

Jackie Saccoccio
Right Portrait

2011

Oil and mica on linen

213.4 x 182.9 cm
“I hope my work elicits ideas about impermanence, as Jasper Johns and Tony Smith do for me.”

It may come as a surprise that the starting point for Jackie Saccoccio’s paintings is portraiture from the 15-1600s, specifically the work of Holbein, Correggio and Ghirlandaio. While these art historical heavyweights might provide an initial inspiration, Saccoccio’s influences range from the landscapes of the Hudson River School, to the dazzling energy found in the work of second generation American abstract expressionist Joan Mitchell.
Jackie Saccoccio
Portrait (Celestial)

2012

Oil and mica on linen

243.8 x 228.6 cm

Text by Gemma de Cruz


Articles

JACKIE SACCOCCIO IN TRANSPARENCY
Black and White Gallery, 2006

Jackie Saccoccio’s latest paintings are ferocious. Her virtuosic handling of line, shape, light, and space, and her recent turn to
intense, often acidic color, confront us with a remarkably wide range of shifting, complicated visual relationships, especially in
multi-part works like =3, 2006. Beyond the formal and conceptual complexity internal to individual works, Saccoccio’s art
engages diverse and challenging artistic precedents, from the Roman Baroque (Annibale Carracci’s ceiling frescoes in the
Farnese Palace, Francesco Borromini’s Oratorio dei Filippini) to contemporary abstraction (Elizabeth Murray’s constructed
canvases). In these new works, the exuberance of transforming matter into translucency — or painting “in transparency,” as
Saccoccio puts it, in language borrowed from Jean-Paul Sartre — is bodied forth alongside the possibility of its occlusion or
collapse into darkness. But here occlusion, too, can be a source of pleasure for eye and mind, as in the appearance of the
vibrant, high-key color of Symphony No. 3 in E flat major for S. B. (2006) on top of a black-and-white wall drawing, or in the
comic scotoma of Blackish Hole (2006).

Source: blackandwhitegallery.com


INTERVIEW: JACKIE SACCOCCIO
Henri Art Magazine

I first saw Jackie Saccoccio’s paintings when she showed at Black & White gallery in 2007. I spent time with the work, caught by the color and freedom of her painting style. I was intrigued by the play of the linear wall drawings and the painterly works themselves. I ruminated with the imagery for the next few days and managed to make it back to the gallery a couple of times. Jackie’s work resonated with me, and the more I thought about it the stronger it seemed. This is no small feat, especially for abstract painting at this time – her works are both smart and sexy.
We caught up with Jackie for an exchange of ideas just before her new show at 11 Rivington opens on January 11th.
Mark Stone: Your show in 2007 was a marvel for a lot of abstract painters, and I think it heralded a new interest in abstract painting amongst gallery goers. This past summer there was a sort of fashionable resurgence of abstraction in the galleries that had to do with the critical success of your show. In the context of the public over the past year what do think has changed for abstraction – what has become “sexy” about it?
Jackie Saccoccio: That’s very generous, thank you. I think the propensity of complex painting out there has been building for a while. I think that has to do more with the public at large trying to make sense of some of the larger looming uncertainties – the life price for unabashed greed, for example – war, global warming, etc. Blatant literalism of some of the 90’s work rings as glib or propagandistic in this type of climate. Work that asks questions or is open-ended offers a place to reflect and accept uncertainty. Some of this fresh stuff finds itself in abstraction for sure and the level of complexity is growing – that’s been building for many years with Michel Majerus, Joyce Pensato, Rosemarie Trockel, Katarina Grosse, Sarah Morris, Mary Heilmann, etc.
MS: Your work expands the possibilities of the expressionist 80s without resorting to Postmodern mannerist overtones. The possibilities for your work seem limitless – you have form, color, space and light. How have you managed to push beyond the Postmodernism of the “New Abstractionists” of the early 90s? What is your relationship to Postmodernism – if any?

Source: henrimag.com


JACKIE SACCOCCIO
Time Out New York

Jackie Saccoccio’s latest paintings, titled “Portraits,” have the beauty and menace of an explosion or an oil spill. Bits of pictorial information are both obscured and revealed as layers of pigment accumulate and spread across the surface; drips and fingerlike tendrils of viscous liquid flowing in all directions are evidence that the canvases were repeatedly turned or rotated while the colors were still wet. These parts of the compositions possess an anxious energy offset by ethereal, atmospheric veils, threatening to swallow the pictures whole.

Source: timeout.com


JACKIE SACCOCCIO|ELEVEN RIVINGTON
2010, Art Hag

Jackie Saccoccio's One To One features a single, massive abstract painting occupying an entire wall of Eleven Rivington. The lush, fifteen-feet-wide piece is an eye-full, offering different images and details from various vantage points. Amongst the swirls and swathes of deep colors and under some murky splotches, the canvas seems to depict flickering lights in a nighttime cityscape or images of flora. Translucent, milky smears wash out and obscure some areas and in another spot the canvas seems to be dissolving before your eyes.
The New York and Connecticut-based Saccoccio also applied a transparent film onto the gallery's glass facade which transforms her painting when viewed from outside. When standing inside the gallery, between the painting and the windows, you become immersed in the work in "a mercurial third layer of the painting environment" (from the press release). With One To One, Saccoccio has created an innovative, rich, and enveloping work. Learn more at elevenrivington.com and see the artist's website at Jackiesaccoccio.com. Through July 9th.

Source: arthag.typepad.com


OFF THE GRID: NEW ART GROWS ON AND NEAR THE BOWERY
By Stephen Mueller, Downtownexpress.com

A new civilization of gallery life has sprung up in the immediate vicinity of the New Museum on the Bowery and along the blocks east of Ludlow Street. Reminiscent of the East Village scene of the ’80s, the current gentrification, somewhat less funky, makes a viable alternative to the architectural statement of mega-galleries hugging the Hudson in Chelsea. There is a “back to the roots” feeling about the spaces and a cottage industry look of an earlier time about the art being shown.
A prime example is Jackie Saccoccio’s smallish-room, big-painting show at Eleven Rivington. Entitled “Interrupted Grid,” the exhibition is composed of seven sizable works, all oil on canvas. Saccoccio riffs on the adage that all contemporary painting springs from a grid of some sort. She gleefully explodes and otherwise warps the notion of the grid using jumps in scale and color ranging from hyped-up earth tones to just plain hyped-up color in a thick and thin tour de force of painterly technique.
Equipped with an extensive knowledge of the history of Western painting and its mechanics in the modernist movement, Saccoccio proceeds to disrupt the picture plane either by continually contradicting space or by defining it. Her work calls to mind painters from Italian mannerist masters to Joan Mitchell to contemporaries like Louise Fishman, but with a fresher palette with less depictive chroma.
Saccoccio’s color can be difficult. Compositionally she uses what Hans Hoffman refers to as “push and pull,” an approach that ties abstract painting to Renaissance spatial conceits. It’s fun to watch Saccoccio’s work dance around the modernist canon, which denies spatial concerns to abstract painting.
For a long time the grid, which Saccoccio does indeed interrupt, served painters as a way around the formal modernist edict forbidding space. With her, it’s as if Renaissance light and space peek through a web of formal gesture and disintegrating flatness. Especially successful in this respect, and a great painting, is ”Pistachio Grid.” “Blue Balls” and “I’m Feeling Feelings” are also vital works in the show.
This exhibition bodes well both for Saccoccio and for the future of painting — from the ground up — in this exciting “new” neighborhood for art.

Source: downtownexpress.com