•  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
Saatchi Art
Saatchi Store
Current Exhibition

SELECTED WORKS BY James White

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James White
B

2003

Oil on birch ply

40 x 32 cm
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James White
Beers

2002

Oil on birch ply

40 x 32 cm
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James White
Franck And Empties

2003

Oil on birch ply

40 x 32 cm
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James White
New Tattoo

2003

Oil on birch ply

40 x 32 cm
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James White
Sid And Socks

2003

Oil on birch ply

40 x 32 cm

ARTICLES

Review of James White: MAX WIGRAM GALLERY, by Katherine Holmgren for Frieze Magazine

Framed by shell-shock markets and shock-value artists, James White’s new show at Max Wigram - his third at the gallery - offers a staid anomaly: a scrupulously constructed picture of the unremarkable. Nothing particularly innovative or surprising jumps out here. White’s brand of photorealism is meticulous though hardly groundbreaking, when placed against such recent reappraisals as last year’s ‘The Painting of Modern Life’ at the Hayward Gallery. White’s focus on banal subjects treads a well-worn path, as does his emphasis on formalist concerns. Yet in its very blasé character, White’s paintings manage to strike a chord.

The exhibition comprises two new series: ‘The Rough with the Smooth’ (2008) and ‘Relationships’ (2006-8). In both, White chooses unheroic objects for subject matter - sinks, aeroplane trays, chocolate bars - which he paints onto plywood sheets and places in Perspex vitrines. Presented in this way, the images’ identity becomes increasingly slippery. The glossy Perspex emulates photography’s smooth yet intangible picture plane, while the monochrome palette accentuates the sculptural side of White’s resolutely domestic subjects. Glimpses of brushwork emerge upon closer examination, only heightening this confusion over medium. Suddenly, hooked by formalist concerns, we find ourselves fascinated by the daily sights that usually fail to snag the eye.

In Broken (2008), a shattered wine glass has a statuesque beauty, offset by its lack of psychological or emotional significance. Likewise, in Dad’s Deck (2008), the reflective cover of a record player generates flat expanses and volumes that contain a purely formal appeal. If it is said that photographs have no ‘surface’, here, as the series’ titles suggest, images are all about surfaces, textures and formal relationships.
In Twix (2008), a stained white table with its cheap chocolate and radio has a clichéd air. We have seen this average scene too many times for it to produce even a spark of interest. Yet in this lies a certain appeal: as a record of our society’s profoundly blasé attitude - towards art as much as the objects we encounter on a daily basis - White’s image achieves an eerie poignancy.

Read the entire article here
Source: frieze.com

Review of James White’s exhibition at the Max Wigram Gallery by artdaily.org

LONDON.- Max Wigram Gallery presents an exhibition of new paintings by James White. The works continue White’s archiving of the minutiae of modern life. His black and white oil paintings on plywood panels are composed from the snapshots the artist takes of the objects that surround him.

Like the cinematic ‘cutaway shot’, White’s images are deliberately emptied of any dramatic content of their own; our focus momentarily rests on an intimate group of objects that silently resonate within a grander scheme. In refusing to acknowledge a wider visual world, White’s exacting gaze suggests an external narrative in much the same way that the simple image of a drinking glass might when scrutinized within the context of a crime scene photograph.

Rather than merely celebrating the inherent beauty of the banal, White’s paintings are iconic, subtle reflections on the quotidian. Despite the sense of intimacy within the work, the artist equally distances the viewer from the scenes he represents. This detachment is intensified by the characteristic absence of colour and the presentation of the paintings encapsulated in Perspex box-like frames.

The paintings in the show derive from photographs taken mainly in hotel rooms and the artist’s studio. Both locations exacerbate the sense of isolation and quiet respite from the day to day. ’2.40 am (Berlin Hotel)’ and ’2.45 am (Berlin Hotel)’ show personal objects scattered around a hotel room where the artist is spending a sleepless night. These personal belongings are the only reminders of the artist’s presence in the room, the sole evidence of the occupier within an otherwise totally impersonal space.

Read the entire article here
Source: artdaily.org


Review of JAMES WHITE: The Rough with the Smooth/Relationships, 2008, by ArtRabbit.com

White is well known for his black and white, meticulously crafted paintings of quiet, familiar situations and ordinary subjects. At the core of White’s practice is the slow transformation of his own snapshots of daily life into paintings, which ultimately become sculptural objects. By encasing the paintings in vitrine-like perspex boxes the artist emphasizes the objecthood of the work, at the same time denying the viewer a direct relationship with the painted surface. In these crystalline paintings emptied of colour, objects are reduced to the core of their essence and are turned from the tools of the everyday into symbolic fragments of a life – mysterious icons of the familiar.

The Rough with the Smooth/Relationships presents eight new paintings and brings together two new bodies of work.

On the first floor, paintings belonging to The Rough with the Smooth document moments from a transitional period in the artist’s life - melancholic moments when items are left behind or brought into a new context: “As happens repeatedly in White’s work, the specified moment is not that of delirious communion with a distracting pastime, but one anterior or posterior to it: an instant in which a specific diversion from earthly cares is seen with its lights out, its appeal made slightly mysterious; thereby throwing into relief the ongoing compromise, the fragile neediness, of the users’ life” (Martin Herbert)

Read the entire article here
Source: artrabbit.com