Selected works by Jenny Saville

Jenny Saville
Strategy (South Face/Front Face/North Face)

1993/1994

Oil on canvas (triptych)

274 x 640 cm 108 x 252''
Jenny Saville
Fulcrum

1999

Oil on canvas (triptych)

261.6 x 487.7 cm 103 x 193''
Jenny Saville
Trace

1993-94

Oil on canvas (triptych)

213.5 x 165 cm 84 x 65''
Jenny Saville
Plan

1993

Oil on canvas

274 x 213.5 cm 108 x 84''
Jenny Saville
Host

2000

Oil on canvas

304.8 x 457.2 cm 120 x 180''
Jenny Saville
Shift

1996-97

Oil on canvas

330.2 x 330.2 cm 130 x 130''
Jenny Saville
Hybrid

1997

Oil on canvas

274.3 x 213.4 cm 108 x 84''
Jenny Saville
Propped

1992

Oil on canvas

213.5 x 183 cm
Jenny Saville
Prop

1993

Oil on canvas

213.5 x 183 cm
Jenny Saville
Passage

2004

Oil on canvas

336 x 290 cm
Jenny Saville: With the transvestite I was searching for a body that was between genders. I had explored that idea a little in Matrix. The idea of floating gender that is not fixed. The transvestite I worked with has a natural penis and false silicone breasts. Thirty or forty years ago this body couldn’t have existed and I was looking for a kind of contemporary architecture of the body. I wanted to paint a visual passage through gender – a sort of gender landscape. To scale from the penis, across a stomach to the breasts, and finally the head. I tried to make the lips and eyes be very seductive and use directional mark-making to move your eye around the flesh.

Simon Schama: So you really do manipulate what’s in front of you through the mark-making. It’s very striking – I’m looking at a photograph of your transvestite painting Passage and that passage that moves from the penis and balls to the belly is really about the anatomy of paint as it constructs the body.

Jenny Saville: I have to really work at the tension between getting the paint to have the sensory quality that I want and be constructive in terms of building the form of a stomach, for example, or creating the inner crevice of a thigh. The more I do it, the more the space between abstraction and figuration becomes interesting. I want a painting realism. I try to consider the pace of a painting, of active and quiet areas. Listening to music helps a lot, especially music where there’s a hard sound and then soft breathable passages. In my earlier work my marks were less varied. I think of each mark or area as having the possibility of carrying a sensation. (Extract from ‘Interview with Jenny Saville by Simon Schama)
Jenny Saville
Torso 2

2004

Oil on canvas

360 x 294 cm

Jenny Saville’s monumental paintings wallow in the glory of expansiveness. Jenny Saville is a real painter’s painter. She constructs painting with the weighty heft of sculpture. Her exaggerated nudes point up, with an agonizing frankness, the disparity between the way women are perceived and the way that they feel about their bodies. One of the most striking aspects of Jenny Saville’s work is the sheer physicality of it. Jenny Saville paints skin with all the subtlety of a Swedish massage; violent, painful, bruising, bone crunching.


Other Resources

artfacts.net
Additional information on Jenny Saville

the-artists.org
More information on Jenny Saville

brain-juice.com - Jenny Saville
In a society often obsessed with physical appearance, Jenny Saville has created a niche for overweight women in contemporary visual culture.

findarticles.com - Jenny Saville, Interview by Elton John
Whether they love her work, hate her work, or simply don't know what to make of it, one thing everyone seems to be in agreement on is that this painter is one of the most daring of our time. Elton John gets the story - Interview

artnet.com - A Painter's Progress, by Dennis Kardon
At Gagosian, the young British painter Jenny Saville has achieved something, er, Sensational. The nostalgic smell of oil paint fills the gallery, but we are not in for a walk down memory lane. Her huge paintings of female nudes are completely historical, even hewing to academic traditions, and still manage to question everything.

guardian.co.uk - The female gaze by Alison Roberts
Saville's blatantly feminist subject matter - obese and sometimes faceless women whose vast bodies resemble mottled pink relief maps or hugely rendered versions of ancient fertility charms - partly originates in a trip to America made midway through her course at the Glasgow School of Art.

guardian.co.uk - Under the skin
Jenny Saville's paintings are known for the mountains of flesh they reveal, but it is the neuroses bursting through that interest her, she tells Suzie Mackenzie
eyestorm.com - Eyestorm
The images that had catapulted Saville into the international artworld were born from a fusion of her addictive love of painting and strong interest in feminist theory.

newyorkmetro.com - Fresh Meat By Mark Stevens
The paintings of Jenny Saville, the latest prodigy from the Freud-Bacon school of British fleshmongers, amount to a kind of anti-advertising. The vogue the 29-year-old English artist is enjoying is not simply the result of talent; many artists as skillful with the brush are routinely ignored. Nor is it a matter of her being more or less original. Saville is deeply indebted to other English artists, notably Lucian Freud, yet is not chastised for being derivative. She is flourishing because she has found a way -- in her treatment of large nudes -- to give form to powerful underlying expectations in the art world about both art and the body.