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  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
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SELECTED WORKS BY Johannes Kahrs

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Johannes Kahrs
La Révolution Permanente

2000

Oil on canvas, Plexiglas, Metal (2 panels)

193.5 x 269 cm
Johannes Kahrs’s large-scale canvases take their imagery from popular media: press photos, newsreel and film stills. Presented without context of their origin, Kahrs’s paintings merge the banal and horrific, as his generic subjects become monumentalised and frozen in non-sequential time. Rendered with flawless technique, Kahr’s highly realistic style captures the imperfect aesthetics of photography. Using the art historical, ‘high culture’ tradition of painting to transform the shadows of over exposure, the acid hues of print, or the ‘snow’ of tv, Kahrs displaces his familiar images, transforming the ‘disposable moments’ of media image bytes into disquieting portraits of contemporary zeitgeist.
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Johannes Kahrs
Silent depression

1999

Oil on canvas

160 x 210.2 cm
Johannes Kahrs’s large-scale canvases take their imagery from popular media: press photos, newsreel and film stills. Presented without context of their origin, Kahrs’s paintings merge the banal and horrific, as his generic subjects become monumentalised and frozen in non-sequential time. Rendered with flawless technique, Kahr’s highly realistic style captures the imperfect aesthetics of photography. Using the art historical, ‘high culture’ tradition of painting to transform the shadows of over exposure, the acid hues of print, or the ‘snow’ of tv, Kahrs displaces his familiar images, transforming the ‘disposable moments’ of media image bytes into disquieting portraits of contemporary zeitgeist.

ARTICLES

Johannes Kahrs

Johannes Kahrs - Daad Galerie

By Harald Fricke

A telephone card based on Johannes Kahrs' painting HIT, 1994, is being issued to commemorate his receipt of the International Schlumberger Award for Art. Ironically, this work is the realistic portrait of a woman who faces the viewer with closed eyes, her hands held against her ears as if to block out noise, she looks as if she is pressing her face against a pane of glass.

In most of his works, he uses photographs from newspapers as models from which he creates large easel paintings, which have a stylistic affinity to the work of Gerhard Richter. His backgrounds disappear into a field of cloudy grays that obscures any possible identification of a particular situation, but in these works the viewer is not even given the temporal or thematic reference points provided, for example, in Richter's "RAF" series.

Instead of giving us social reality in the raw--as one might expect in those paintings that depict war victims and other victims of violence--he covers everything with an art-historical veneer: Kahrs emphasizes minimal color changes--for example, from milky gray to a bottle-green--as if he were trying to obey Impressionist notions of perception; incorporates text fragments; or paints over facial and body parts with black rectangles.

The stump of an upper thigh remains an abstract surface in Mann mit amputiertem Bein (Man with amputated leg, 1993) so that instead of identifying with the subject of the painting the viewer's experience of the work becomes fragmented and Kahrs' victims remain mute.

Read the entire article here: Source: findarticles.com