•  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
Saatchi Art
Saatchi Store
Current Exhibition

Jonathan Meese & Albert Oehlen

SELECTED WORKS BY Jonathan Meese & Albert Oehlen

*
Jonathan Meese & Albert Oehlen
Situation

2003

Oil and Inkjet Print on Wood

208 x 280cm (Collaboration with Albert Oehlen)
Albert Oehlen and Jonathan Meese both make paintings about failure: of the function of art, politics, and ideological systems. Working collaboratively, they explore these terrains in a hard-hitting and overtly humorous way. Situation creates a highly sexed still-life: a mangled-faced female figure reduced to tits and a brain. Dealing with issues of visual ideals and sexual politics, their cyborg superwoman is less an archetype of perfection than the suggestive abstract sculptures on the plinth beside her.
*
Jonathan Meese & Albert Oehlen
Storm

2004

Oil and Inkjet Print on Wood

208 x 280cm (Collaboration with Albert Oehlen)
Describing their merger as a courtly affair of awkward politeness punctuated by artistic embarrassment, Albert
Oehlen & Jonathan Meese unite forces as a way to expand both practice and dialogue. Like a conceptual game of tennis, an artwork is begun, and then bantered back and forth until it gains a life of its own. For the artists, it's a way to accept loosing control over a work, explore the possibility of spontaneous action and reaction, and stamp out self-indulgent excess like a bad habit. The end results are both breathtaking and funny. Storm cheekily sets computer-generated porn as the hot-bod for a wild-armed monstress: a goddess of violent temper and salvation.
*
Jonathan Meese & Albert Oehlen
The Greeting

2003

Oil and Inkjet Print on Wood

208 x 280cm (Collaboration with Albert Oehlen)
In a collaborative process made simple, Oehlen provides the photographic material and both artists take turns painting around it. None of these works are immediately recognisable as Oehlen or Meese, and that's what makes them so good. Like a nuclear fusion, the two become one; an invincible super-artist refining the best qualities of both.

The Greeting is a ridiculous portrait of a lumpy gangly-armed housewife waving about a feather duster/penis, teetering on glamour model's legs. The render her almost obscenely repulsive, but the sexual delusion of the male gaze is inevitable: the artists' collage in a mirror to peek up her dress.

ARTICLES

Loose canon: Matt Saunders on Jonathan Meese's Mother Parsifal

By Matt Saunders, ArtForum, Summer 2005 AT THE END of John Boorman's 1974 cult film Zardoz, Sean Connery and Charlotte Rampling sit in a cave and age quickly through the rest of their lives while Beethoven's Seventh Symphony booms. The cuts move with the music, so each new phrase of orchestral high Kuitur seems to bury them deeper under campy pancake and latex. As pretentious tableau, it pits lifetime against geological time, and as eccentric comedy, it transforms the two sex symbols into Pirate's Cove theme-park skeletons. From Jonathan Meese, I expected something of the same.

Jonathan Meese Is Mother Parsifal set the young artist alone against the well-over-five hours of Wagner's slow-moving epic in the vast scenery store-house of Berlin's Staatsoper Unter den Linden. There Meese performed three shows in March, with music piped in live from the new Eichinger and Barenboim production of Parsifal, which was playing simultaneously in the Staatsoper's main auditorium. It was a prestigious venue for the Berlin art scene's resident Wagnerian--although, aside from promising an endurance test, it was unclear until opening night what Meese would actually do.

Sitting on bleachers, clutching wool blankets in the soaring, unheated Magazin, we confronted an extraordinary junk pile of a stage. Majestic in the center stood the enormous stone head from Zardoz, transformed into a Janus-faced portrait of Wagner--on one side Meese's rough version and on the other a souvenir-shop likeness, embellished with a great phallic chin. A blowup of a small sculpture, it bore oversize traces of the artist's thumbprints. On the back wall was a painted caption: DR. SAINT PROPAGANDADDY SPOKE. Homemade Meesiana littered the stage: weapons and helmets; large photos of Klaus Kinski with hand-painted captions like THANK YOU and FRIEND; and, down some stairs. The Propagandist, a bronze humanoid sporting five huge dicks. A rickety ladder led down to a pit, where four blank canvases stood ready. With rows of plastic skeletons flanking a throne at center stage, the set seemed as much goth bar as Valhalla.


Albert Oehlen and Jonathan Meese at Max Hetzler and Contemporary Fine Art
By Christopher Phillips, Art in America, Dec 2004

Among Berlin's most surprising recent exhibitions was this two-gallery show of collaborative paintings by an unlikely pair: Albert Oehlen and Jonathan Meese. Oehlen is an established figure who for more than a decade has shown virtuosic quasi-abstractions that only distantly recall the raucous experimental works he made with Martin Kippenberger in the 1980s. Meese is the reigning enfant terrible of the German art scene. (His Anglo name notwithstanding, he grew up in Germany and attended the Hamburg Art Academy.)

For the past five years, Meese's prodigious output has run the gamut from outlandish performances, sprawling installations and slapdash paintings to unexpectedly accomplished bronze sculptures. All of his activities flow from free-associational fantasies involving megalomaniacal figures such as Wagner, Fassbinder, Hitler, Mishima--and Jonathan Meese. (The Walter Mittyesque aspect of Meese's work has gone largely unremarked in Germany.)

The 16 large canvases that were shown at Hetzler and CFA consist of Meese's wild overpaintings on inkjet prints of quirky found photographic images that were selected by Oehlen. Visually these works are far more interesting than anything either artist has done individually of late. The underlying photo images provide a solidity of structure previously absent from Meese's cartoonish canvases, while the alternation of coolly photographic passages and vigorously laid-on gobs of colorful paint creates a convincingly energetic effect. The lurching humanoid figures that emerge from the extravagant pile-ups of pigment recall those found in Asger Jorn's brilliant "modifications" of flea-market canvases during the 1950s and '60s, suggesting that Meese's erudite partner may have provided some pointers.

Read the entire article
Source: findarticles.com