Selected works by Jonny Briggs

Jonny Briggs
Portal

2011

C-type Lambda print

101 x 139 cm

Magicians, comedians, people who disturb our comfortable interpretation of the world…” These are among the influences Briggs cites and they seem apt indeed: you have to pay close attention to the artist’s tricks to figure out what’s happening: did you miss his mother’s well-hidden body in Portal? Or his father’s ever so discrete presence in Into the Black?

Jonny Briggs
Into The Black

2011

C-type Lambda print

110 x 114 cm

Each of Briggs’ photographs is set up as a stage, with the players (most often his mother and his father) miming unsettling thoughts and hinting at unresolved domestic tensions.

Jonny Briggs
The Other

2011

Tapestry

25 x 18 cm (approx)

Briggs prefers flirtation with the unsaid rather than confrontation, but the one-act plays do contain an element of revenge, or at least the suggestion that there are old scores to settle.

Jonny Briggs
Untitled Wooden Chair

2011

Wood

50 x 25 x 25 cm

The Briggs family album, to which the artist often has recourse, is both a curse and a blessing: it certainly recalls momentary joys of childhood, but it also reminds Briggs of the role he was obliged to play in the ‘performances’ directed by his father. Now Briggs-the-artist has the upper hand, proving Wordsworth’s famous observation, “the child is the father of the man.”

Text by William A Ewing

Jonny Briggs
Un-Seeing

2012

C-type Lambda print

112 x 177 cm
Jonny Briggs
Comfort Object

2012

C-type Lambda prints mounted on aluminium

110 x 110 cm
Jonny Briggs
1p Coin

2011

23 1/4 carat gold

20.3 x 1.6 mm

Articles

STUDIO VISIT: JONNY BRIGGS
November 7, 2010, by Pennytristram, Pennytristam.wordpress.com

Jonny Briggs’ studio is 3 floors up on Kensington Gore at the RCA. It’s where his weird, surreal and quirky photo props begin their lives. When I visited Jonny’s studio a few weekends ago, I was greeted by an in-progress model of his Dad’s head.
Penny- How are you making the model of your Dad’s head?Jonny- Basically I love faking things in my work, and I wanted to fake one of the old statues, where you have busts of people, and I wanted him to be like a pawn as well, like a chess pawn. You can see from the back that it is pawn-like.
P- Do you do it through observation, or how does it work exactly?
J- This was made from a 3d scan of the head, and then it became a digital file which you could revolve on the computer, and then I inverted the nose so that the nose goes into the head instead of out of it, and then it continues as a Pinocchio nose that goes through the head.
P- What’s the significance of the Pinocchio nose? I ’ve seen those in the photos on your website.
J- A lot of times in my work I am compensating for the lost parts of my childhood, and I find that a lot of my work is recreating my childhood through adult eyes, because I am an adult now, so inevitably there are going to be collisions between adult and childhood fantasies. I find that Pinocchio in particular is very associated with childhood and with lies and deception, which I like, as I love exploring the boundary between real and fake in my work. There’s also a suggestively there, like it’s incredibly phallic, and it brings to life the phallic nature of the nose itself, so by inverting it, it becomes quite vaginal.

Read the entire article here
Source: pennytristram.wordpress.com


YOUNG BRITISH ARTISTS 2.0 TRY TO MAKE WAY IN WAKE OF HIRST AND CO
Jan 2012, by Alex Needham, Guardian

Meanwhile, Royal College of Art graduate Jonny Briggs has defied Dovey's dire prediction and has sold work to Saatchi, But the days of Hirst and the Young British Artists (YBAs) – when this would have been a fast track to stardom – have long passed.

In October Briggs, 26, won New Sensations, a competition created by the Saatchi Gallery and Channel 4 to find Britain's most talented art graduate.

His work documents his attempts to "connect with his childhood self", and includes a photograph of him wearing a giant wooden mask made to look like his father's face.

This theme could be taken as making a virtue out of necessity; Briggs cannot afford to move out of his parents' home, though he does rent a studio in a former factory in south London "where Twiglets were invented".

Read the entire article here
Source: www.guardian.co.uk