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    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
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Current Exhibition

EXHIBITED AT THE SAATCHI GALLERY

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Jörg Immendorff
Marcels Erlösung [Marcel's Salvation]   

1988

Oil on canvas

260 x 300 cm
In an ode to Dadaist icon Marcel Duchamp, Jorg Immendorff paints an art hero’s Valhalla. In a living-room-cum-art studio-cum-club, he gives the illusion of theatrical space. Images within images, he builds an architecture through the placement of paintings throughout the room, confusing masterpiece with reality.

Towards the back of the scene lies a brighter framed image: this is no ordinary lounge, but a private celebrity chamber of Café Deutschland. Figured with his favourite cigars and chessboard, and tuxedoed waiter bringing tipple, Duchamp accepts a light from the always hatted Joseph Beuys.

Seeming to wallow in his own chain-smoking reclusiveness, Jorg Immendorff renders Duchamp as a rat-packish figure from another era. High class tinged with sadness, he cuts through with an energetic doodle of slapstick zaniness.
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Jörg Immendorff
Ende gut, alles gut [All's Well That Ends Well]   

1983

Oil on Canvas

282 x 330 cm
In this painting, Jorg Immendorff presents a divided Germany in turmoil. Adopting Shakespeare’s theatre as a post-Fascist arena, eagle-folk run en masse towards the future, while the few still clamouring to the past are trampled, bleeding, underfoot.
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Jörg Immendorff
Gyntiana - Gebur t Zwiebelmann [Gyntiana - The Birth of Onionman]   

1992

Oil on canvas

300 x 400 cm
In Gyntiana, Jorg Immendorff presents an allegory of creation: surrounded by heroes of ideological importance, an onion springs forth from a richly fertile womb. Jorg Immendorff once said that painting ‘has the function of a potato’. Here it’s reborn in the multilayered richness of ideological and intellectual nourishment.
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Jörg Immendorff
Solo

1988

Oil on Canvas

200 x 150 cm
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Jörg Immendorff
Sonnentor [Gate of the Sun]   

1994

Oil on canvas

280 x 280 cm
In later paintings Jorg Immendorff turns his concerns to the politics of the art world, drawing reference from and adding to a critical lexicon of art history. In Door to the Sun, his theatre is seen from backstage. The haloed silhouette of his mentor Beuys, dominating the arena, is rendered as a Wizard of Oz construction: not a man, but a museum, being slowly uncrated into the form of Jorg Immendorff. His ice forms, which previously symbolised the freezing decay of a nation, now embody the tools of painting.
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Jörg Immendorff
Café Deutschland (Lift/Tremble/Back)

1984

Oil on canvas

285 x 330 cm
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Jörg Immendorff
Café Deutschland: Contemplating The Question - Where Do I Stand

1987

Oil on Canvas

250 x 330 cm
Jörg Immendorff’s large canvases are often fraught with the imagery of a literal theatre of decadence. His stage-set compositions allude to the illusionary aspects of art, presenting a script of personal mythology that is often poignant, humorous, scathing and prophetic.

Myth-making is at the core of Jorg Immendorff’s work. Political iconography, such as the German eagle, Soviet sickle and Socialist Worker’s fist, mix quite literally with his ever expanding cast of characters, including both politicians and artist friends. At the heart is a rewriting of history - both political and artistic - where personal positioning and moral reconciliation are at the forefront.
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Jörg Immendorff
Society of Deficiency

1990

Oil on Canvas

270 x 180cm
Spanning three decades of immense political change in his native Germany, Jorg Immendorff’s work took a turn from the political to the personal in the late eighties. His many self-portraits depict a lonely creator, whose role as cultural antenna has been rendered suddenly obsolete.

Society of Deficiency is a more gloomy scene: the artist in his studio/toxic wasteland, struggling to create, surrounded by repetitive symbols of Joseph Beuys’ hat and a primitive monument of himself.
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Jörg Immendorff
Back to Front

1998

Oil on Canvas

270 x 180cm
Adapting all the elements of a nineteenth century allegory, Jorg Immendorff’s Back to Front is a political manifesto rendered through symbolism.

Jorg Immendorff presents a canvas divided in three parts: labour, knowledge and possibility. His central figure, a goddess-like woman embodying an owl of wisdom, is the icon nurture and virtue, radiant against the bleak background of storm clouds and darkness. Through her flows a stream of fertility and rebirth in the form of labia-like fruits, proffered from the toil of the rural worker.

In the foreground, Jorg Immendorff depicts the present as an arid and cracked soil. His egg - reminiscent of the globe - offers hope for the future, weighting down a manuscript stating: ‘Society with a lack: industry, pride, honesty, respect before Art.’

ARTICLES

Jorg Immendorff: I Wanted to be an Artist
By James Rosenthal

This expert survey of Jörg Immendorff's career reassesses an artist whose period of notoriety in America lasted a relatively short time in the 1980's. This was partly a matter of mistaken identity - he was too closely linked with the neo-expressionist and new image (?) bandwagon prevalent at the time. His connection to direct contemporaries who gained mega-celebrity status, Anselm Keifer and Gerhardt Richter, is also shown to be partly incidental. From this exhibition, Immendorff emerges more fully as an original artist of great complexity. This reevaluation also makes distinctions that remove him from convenient generalizations made about the "postmodern" Eighties, the Trans-Avant-Garde, and art generally, and it illustrates thoroughly the conceptual nature of his work.
Born in 1945, Immendorff was of the generation that experienced post-war disillusionment that politicized every waking moment. As a student in the 1960s, he faced the task of examining Germany's tragic history and its fraught relationship with modernity. This forced him to devise a balancing act between eras.

Immendorff subsequently takes on the multiple roles of jester, storyteller and historian. He actively participates in a self-conscious continuum of twentieth-century German art while simultaneously throwing stones at the powers that be. After running the full gamut of conceptual work la fluxus, his adoption of painting appears as a sort of purposeful and elaborate bluff. Although this suits his needs, it makes the connection to Ludwig Kirchner and the original German expressionist group die Brücke seem almost superfluous. What comes to the fore instead is a weaving together of political, social and personal myth making. It is the content that matters most, putting him more in line with the social, satirical and metaphorical intents of George Grosz and Max Beckmann respectively.

Read the entire article
Source: artcritical.com


Jorg Immendorff talks to Pamela Kort - '80s Then - Interview

ArtForum, March, 2003

PAMELA KORT: What were the signal moments in the '80s for you?
JORG IMMENDORFF: In 1982 I had my first large museum show in Germany at the Kunsthalle Dusseldorf, where my "Cafe Deutschland" [1978-82] paintings were featured. Shortly thereafter I participated for the second time in Documenta, and just a few months later "Zeitgeist" opened at the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin.
This period was also important to me because of the interaction between the older generation of artists and much younger ones, like Walter Dahn and Georg Jiri Dokoupil, two of the Cologne artists grouped around the Mulheimer Freiheit. They had just been featured in a show at the Museum Folkwang in Essen, "Zehn junge Kunstler aus Deutschland." A few months later their work was also showcased at Documenta 7. It is seldom that an older and younger generation come to public attention at the same time. Then there were books and catalogues published like Hunger nach Bildern and La transavanguardia tedesca. Suddenly all Europe was reacting to the German art scene, not just France and England but also Italy, where painters such as Francesco Clemente and Sandro Chia were working. A big part of the response centered on the debate around so-called figurative painting. And of course it was also at this time that David Salle and Julian Schnabel, who were shown as well at "Zeirgeist," began to exhibit in Europe.

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Source: findarticles.com