Josephine Meckseper

Selected works by Josephine Meckseper

Josephine Meckseper
I Love Jesus

2005

Aluminum, Plexiglas, glass, lights, C-print, metal display stands, plastic mannequin leg, argyle sock, found jewelry, gouache and tape on inkjet print mounted on cardboard, toilet brush, feather duster, acrylic on glass ball, glass vases

226.1 x 116.8 x 45.7 cm
Josephine Meckseper makes collages and installations that reconstruct the worlds of contemporary advertising and fashion in the context of the gallery, as a way of critiquing the political implications of the iconography of consumer culture.
Josephine Meckseper
Talk to Cindy

2005

Aluminum, Plexiglas, glass, lights, metal display stands, painted toilet plunger, ink jet print mounted on cardboard underwear box, found jewelry, gouache and tape on inkjet print mounted on cardboard, found metal scrubber, found jewelry, glass ball,

226.1 x 116.8 x 45.7 cm
In her display cases and photographs we see people and things re-objectified, symbolically removed from their original, all too familiar mediated contexts, and rearranged into self-consciously mirrored window dressing. ‘Yes, the mirror and chrome sculptures, glass-and-steel vitrines, and mirror slatwalls are not affirmations or glorifications of consumerism,’ Meckseper says. ‘Their shiny surfaces are meant as provocations for destruction. They are designed to be targets, like high-end shop windows being smashed during riots and protests. These works mimic retail aesthetics in order to activate the commercial zone into a political one.’
Josephine Meckseper
Selling Out

2004

Window display with mixed media

78 x 148 x 35 cm
In Untitled (2005) a naked mannequin standing in front of a terrorist biography (which also appears in Selling Out, 2004) wears a hoodie and scarf, both menacing and politically charged items as well as emblems of ‘radical chic’. Issues around power, class, nationalism and gender are raised through the fetishised, cropped poses of underwear models and anthropomorphic props in Blow Up (Michelli) (2006) and Untitled (End Democracy) (2005).
Josephine Meckseper
Occident – Orient (RUG NO.3)

2004

Mixed Fabrics

139 X 270 cm

Ubi Pedes Ibi.Patria (Where the feet are, there is the fatherland) (2006) provokes free-associative thoughts of sweatshop labour, bargain basement desperation, social homogeneity and images of shoe piles from the Holocaust. A witty take on cultural consumption, The Complete History of Postcontemporary Art (2005) is redolent with 1990s art allusions, while in Pyromaniac 2 (2003) lifestyle ideals merge with revolutionary violence in a female model on the brink of self-combustion.

Josephine Meckseper
CDU-CSU

2001

C-Print

106 x 165.5 cm

Meckseper’s politically engaged works highlight ongoing problems of corporate corruption, status anxiety, social privilege and representations of women. They are also a chilling reminder of the excesses and distortions of capitalism, which has created a world in which, she would argue, there is no separation between materialism and political ideology: we are what we buy.

Josephine Meckseper
Untitled

2005

Mannequin, fabric, found jewelry, inkjet print on fabric, acrylic and fabric on canvas.

Mannequin: 144.8 x 66 x 43.8 cm
Painting: 61 x 61 cm
Collage: 41 x 41 cm
Josephine Meckseper
Ubi Pedes Ibi. Patria. (Where the feet are, there is the fatherland)

2006

Shoes, display carousel

153 x 83cm
Josephine Meckseper
Pyromaniac 2

2003

C-Print

101 x 76 cm
Josephine Meckseper
Untitled (Berlin Demonstration, Fire, Cops)

2002

C-Print

76 x 101 cm
Josephine Meckseper
RAF Tray

2002

C-Print

50.8 x 40.6 cm
Josephine Meckseper
Untitled (Berlin Demonstration, Police Brigade)

2002

C-Print

76 x 101 cm
Josephine Meckseper
Tout Va Bien

2005

Mixed media in display window

160 x 250.2 x 60 cm
Josephine Meckseper
The Complete History of Postcontemporary Art

2005

Mixed media in display window

160 x 250.2 x 60 cm
Josephine Meckseper
Untitled (End Democracy) (Detail)

2005

Inkjet print, Plexiglas, plastic mannequin torso, metal stand, mirror on wood

144 x 122 x 122 cm
Josephine Meckseper
Blow Up (Michelli)

2006

Mixed media in display vitrine

208.3 x 243.8 x 68.6 cm

Articles

Josephine Meckseper’s exhibition at Elizabeth Dee entitled %


For her new exhibition, entitled %, the artist will transform the gallery into an environment redolent of both consumer capitalism and political protest. Starting with the faade, Meckseper will alter the windows of Elizabeth Dee Gallery to resemble the dramatic display windows of an upscale department store. Mixing semantic codes, the objects on display in one window will seem to sell a vision of current American politics, while the other will offer images of an oppositional culture of protest and references to the womens correctional facility across the street. Vinyl lettering suggests the monolithic encroachment of a homogenizing globalism in a leveraged buyout and merger of New Yorks most prominent museum, gallery, and exhibition sponsor.

Inside, Koolhaasian wood paneling, mirrored tiles, and mannequins sardonically recall the spectacle of avant garde architecture in the service of retail, while a papered wall combines reminders of an obsolescent cold war with the pattern of kefiyah scarves favored by Palestinians and protesting hipsters alike. Mirrored display cubes and wall-mounted shelves round out the complement of fixtures, but on them consumer products are juxtaposed side-by-side with paintings, collages, sculptures, and photographs evoking counter-cultural activity, including the artists own documentary images from the anti-war protest in Washington on September 24 of this year.

Mecksepers work equates our induced desire for fashion and luxury goods with the manipulations of media-driven ruling regimes, but it likewise compares both of these to their supposed antithesis in political protest movements. Partisan politics is just another status symbol. Radicalism quickly becomes radical chic, which is presented as just another formal element to be fetishized and sold in a museum cum gallery cum boutique that nostalgically samples utopian dreams from the Russian Constructivists to 1960s hippies. As the curators of the 2005 Lyon Biennale write,

in Mecksepers work politics becomes a style, and commitment an object to be displayed in a chic display cabinet, suggestive of those in museums and ethnographic societies. Through this approach, Meckseper explores the questionable links the media establish between images of political news, the fashion industry and advertising.

Read the entire article here
Source: re-title.com



Art in Review; Josephine Meckseper

By Roberta Smith

Josephine Meckseper's show is a total environment riven with interesting cracks. Elegantly mirrored, paneled and shelved, it has the stark, slightly too-bright emptiness of an abandoned high-end boutique occupied by style-conscious anarchists. At first the second New York gallery show of this German-born, New York-based artist swings anemically between the obvious and the lazy - not an engaging range of motion. But look again and the piece functions as walk-in Conceptual Art. Enveloped in a brittle glamour, its desiccated scraps mine the overlap of art, politics and consumerism.
Outside the gallery's soaped-over front door, forlorn window displays acknowledge both the real and the plausible: the Women's House of Detention across the street, and the imminent arrival of a business named DR Gagosian UBS. Inside, a hammer and sickle sit on a mirrored cube, and the Texaco star doubles as the Red Star. A red-and-white sign blares SALE. Mannequins, glass baubles and toilet-bowl cleaners alternate with collages that mix black lace, scraps of Palestinian scarves and Constructivist geometries. One collage mentions the Angry Brigade, a group of British anarchists believed to have bombed more than 100 sites (including a Biba boutique) in the early 1970's, without casualties.

Read the entire article here
Source: New Tork Times