Josephine Meckseper

Selected works by Josephine Meckseper

Josephine Meckseper
I Love Jesus

2005

Aluminum, Plexiglas, glass, lights, C-print, metal display stands, plastic mannequin leg, argyle sock, found jewelry, gouache and tape on inkjet print mounted on cardboard, toilet brush, feather duster, acrylic on glass ball, glass vases

226.1 x 116.8 x 45.7 cm
Josephine Meckseper makes collages and installations that reconstruct the worlds of contemporary advertising and fashion in the context of the gallery, as a way of critiquing the political implications of the iconography of consumer culture.
Josephine Meckseper
Talk to Cindy

2005

Aluminum, Plexiglas, glass, lights, metal display stands, painted toilet plunger, ink jet print mounted on cardboard underwear box, found jewelry, gouache and tape on inkjet print mounted on cardboard, found metal scrubber, found jewelry, glass ball,

226.1 x 116.8 x 45.7 cm
In her display cases and photographs we see people and things re-objectified, symbolically removed from their original, all too familiar mediated contexts, and rearranged into self-consciously mirrored window dressing. ‘Yes, the mirror and chrome sculptures, glass-and-steel vitrines, and mirror slatwalls are not affirmations or glorifications of consumerism,’ Meckseper says. ‘Their shiny surfaces are meant as provocations for destruction. They are designed to be targets, like high-end shop windows being smashed during riots and protests. These works mimic retail aesthetics in order to activate the commercial zone into a political one.’
Josephine Meckseper
Selling Out

2004

Window display with mixed media

78 x 148 x 35 cm
In Untitled (2005) a naked mannequin standing in front of a terrorist biography (which also appears in Selling Out, 2004) wears a hoodie and scarf, both menacing and politically charged items as well as emblems of ‘radical chic’. Issues around power, class, nationalism and gender are raised through the fetishised, cropped poses of underwear models and anthropomorphic props in Blow Up (Michelli) (2006) and Untitled (End Democracy) (2005).
Josephine Meckseper
Occident – Orient (RUG NO.3)

2004

Mixed Fabrics

139 X 270 cm

Ubi Pedes Ibi.Patria (Where the feet are, there is the fatherland) (2006) provokes free-associative thoughts of sweatshop labour, bargain basement desperation, social homogeneity and images of shoe piles from the Holocaust. A witty take on cultural consumption, The Complete History of Postcontemporary Art (2005) is redolent with 1990s art allusions, while in Pyromaniac 2 (2003) lifestyle ideals merge with revolutionary violence in a female model on the brink of self-combustion.

Josephine Meckseper
CDU-CSU

2001

C-Print

106 x 165.5 cm

Meckseper’s politically engaged works highlight ongoing problems of corporate corruption, status anxiety, social privilege and representations of women. They are also a chilling reminder of the excesses and distortions of capitalism, which has created a world in which, she would argue, there is no separation between materialism and political ideology: we are what we buy.

Josephine Meckseper
Untitled

2005

Mannequin, fabric, found jewelry, inkjet print on fabric, acrylic and fabric on canvas.

Mannequin: 144.8 x 66 x 43.8 cm
Painting: 61 x 61 cm
Collage: 41 x 41 cm
Josephine Meckseper
Ubi Pedes Ibi. Patria. (Where the feet are, there is the fatherland)

2006

Shoes, display carousel

153 x 83cm
Josephine Meckseper
Pyromaniac 2

2003

C-Print

101 x 76 cm
Josephine Meckseper
Untitled (Berlin Demonstration, Fire, Cops)

2002

C-Print

76 x 101 cm
Josephine Meckseper
RAF Tray

2002

C-Print

50.8 x 40.6 cm
Josephine Meckseper
Untitled (Berlin Demonstration, Police Brigade)

2002

C-Print

76 x 101 cm
Josephine Meckseper
Tout Va Bien

2005

Mixed media in display window

160 x 250.2 x 60 cm
Josephine Meckseper
The Complete History of Postcontemporary Art

2005

Mixed media in display window

160 x 250.2 x 60 cm
Josephine Meckseper
Untitled (End Democracy) (Detail)

2005

Inkjet print, Plexiglas, plastic mannequin torso, metal stand, mirror on wood

144 x 122 x 122 cm
Josephine Meckseper
Blow Up (Michelli)

2006

Mixed media in display vitrine

208.3 x 243.8 x 68.6 cm

Other Resources

artfacts.net
Additional information on Josephine Meckseper

the-artists.org
Modern and contemporary artists and art - Josephine Meckseper

whitecolumns.org
A collection of Josephine Meckseper

jameswagner.com - Josephine Meckseper at Elizabeth Dee
Josephine Meckseper's elegant, ironic installation seductively addresses twenty-first century American consumerism and power, in a not-so-subtle mockery especially of the two things we still do better than anyone else: shopping and shooting.

elizabethdeegallery.com
Josephine Meckseper, Press in PDF format

re-title.com - Josephine Meckseper’s exhibition at Elizabeth Dee entitled %
Mecksepers work equates our induced desire for fashion and luxury goods with the manipulations of media-driven ruling regimes, but it likewise compares both of these to their supposed antithesis in political protest movements.

borgmann-nathusius.de - Josephine Meckseper: solo show at Borgmann Nathusius Gallery
In Lustgarten, Meckseper shows a series of photographs from the anti-war protests in New York and Berlinduring the summer of 2002. The documentation draws on the historical context of the legendary images from protests of the Sixties and Seventies, which were still informed by a romantic notion of a utopian society and political ideologies.

thebrooklynrail.org - The Josephine Meckseper Catalogue
Fashion and politics. Style and revolution. We have emerged from a century of fascism on the runway and the campaign trail. We vote, we buy, based on our own shallowest experience of who we are. We worship our spiritual death in domestic consumerism and actual death abroad.

artcal.net - Josephine Meckseper’s exhibition at Elizabeth Dee entitled %
For her new exhibition, entitled %, the artist will transform the gallery into an environment redolent of both consumer capitalism and political protest. Starting with the façade, Meckseper will alter the windows of Elizabeth Dee Gallery to resemble the dramatic display windows of an upscale department store.

Galerie Reinhard Hauff
Information source for the work of Josephine Meckseper