Lisa Anne Auerbach

Selected works by Lisa Anne Auerbach

Lisa Anne Auerbach
Crystal Energy

2014

Merino wool stitched onto stretched linen

160 x 203.2 cm
“I might knit a statement that only rings true for one day or one hour, but the existence of it extends far beyond this short window.”

Lisa Anne Auerbach started using knitting as a means to ‘write’ bumper sticker style slogans directly onto woollen jumpers to create both an artwork and a wearable, topical statement. Through the process of knitting, her words form an integral part of the final structure rather than being painted or printed on to an existing support, (be it a canvas or a t-shirt), allowing the art and the words to be interwoven as one and the same.
Lisa Anne Auerbach
Oops! Toxic B.S.

2014

Mannequin with Merino wool

152.4 x 30.5 x 61 cm

Find Your Inner Metal Voice, 2011 and Crystal Energy, 2014 are both made using a knitting machine, presented in the style of a traditional painting which offers a semi-mechanical finish and, like her jumpers, combines craft, politics and text.
In Crystal Energy, Auerbach has isolated various insights offered to her by psychics she personally met with, reproducing them as graphic speech bubbles which appear like a mind map, or as thoughts, out of context, the way they might pop up in your brain. The statements at first read as a fun, ingenuous collage of ‘empowering’, self-help style messages, but after a second reading they begin to feel like hollow clichés rather than genuine empathetic guidance.

Lisa Anne Auerbach
Find Your Inner Metal Voice

2011

Merino wool stitched onto stretched linen

160 x 203.2 cm

This is partly due to their uniform writing style and the harshness of the black and white, which reduces the sincerity of the words, replacing their emotional content with a confrontational authority. Like Richard Prince’s ‘joke’ paintings, Auerbach has made seemingly light-hearted statements anonymous and questionable.

Text by Gemma de Cruz


Articles

Lisa Anne Auerbach’s Politically Charged Knitted Sweaters Rock Our World
2012, Huffington Post

We're beyond sick of the political bumper sticker, the political pin and the political Halloween costume. This election day it's all about the political sweater. Cozy and subversive, LA artist Lisa Anne Auerbach's works of knitted art let you bundle up while you speak out.
Auerbach's sweaters, which we first spotted on Flavorwire, feature two centuries of political slogans (from 1812 to 2012) in red-white-and-blue stitchings. Some of the slogans are evergreen; for instance, the 1980 Carter/Reagan campaign line asks, "Are you better off today than you were four years ago?" Others seem more archaic, like 1812's "War Party" sweater. While the issues, eras and political parties differ from sweater to sweater, an underlying patriotism beneath the rhetoric warms our hearts (and our torsos).
Do you have a favorite sweater from Auerbach's collection? We have to admit we have a soft spot for the 'Jewish Grandmas for Obama'. Check out the Fair Isle friends below and don't forget to vote!

Read the entire article here
Source: huffingtonpost.com

Lisa Auerbach’s Awesome, Arty Feminist Sweaters
2012, by Marina Galperina, Flavorwire

Forget binders full of women… The hottest election accessory should be these cozy, subversive art pieces by Los Angeles-based feminist and bike activist artist Lisa Anne Auerbach! Oh. Eh. Sorry that we just did that. Seriously, you can forget the binders, but these sweaters are still awesome. Auerbach, who received an MFA in photography from the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, started creating these deliberately provocative pull-over pieces back in 2004, when she no longer had access to her school’s darkroom. “Knitting was a way I could continue to make art,” she told The New York Times last year. “It’s portable and I can do it anywhere. Now that I’m teaching photography at Pomona College, I knit on the train during my commute, and it’s a great way to pass the time in faculty meetings.” Certainly being pro-bike, anti-monogamist, and gleefully atheist aren’t necessary mutually inclusive philosophies, but browse this closet and see which of her incredible statement sweaters matches you. Ride on!

Read the entire article here
Source: flavorwire.com

Lisa Anne Auerbach
2012, by Rebecca Fulleylove, Dazed Digital

The artist tells us why she couldn't resist picking up a discarded secret stash of torn apart porn and shares her musings on its mysterious previous owner
Back in 1989, American artist Lisa Anne Auerbach salvaged ripped up pornography found at the top of a car park in Chicago O’Hare’s Airport. Only now has she decided to use them in her work to create the series ‘Torn Porn’ where she’s blown up the raunchy magazine scraps into large scale prints. What’s interesting about Auerbach’s work is the ambiguity behind the series, who did they belong to? Why were they thrown away? And ripped up like they were? While it’s unlikely the artist and viewer will ever find out the whole truth about the origins of what Auerbach found, it becomes unimportant when seeing the power these images still have. The snippets of eroticism but also the glimpse into the past of this taboo pursuit with 80s-tinged hair and make-up making an appearance in these brief snapshots. Here Auerbach talks to us about who she’s imagined these pornographic remains belong to and the conflict between shame and desire that transpires when looking at these works.
Dazed Digital: What made you pick up the ripped up pornography when you found it back in 1989?
Lisa Anne Auerbach: How can anyone resist picking up a bunch of porn from piles of dirty snow? I was in a parking garage at the airport when I found the scraps. At the time I was a student studying photography. The scraps were super hot! When I saw them I thought about how much sexier the torn pictures were than any other complete images of this kind. I didn’t know what to do with them at the time, so I put them in a box and left them there for twenty years.
DD: What do you imagine about the owner of these pictures? Do you think they were discarded on purpose?
Lisa Anne Auerbach: They were definitely discarded on purpose. The violence with which they were torn apart suggests to me that the former owner of this publication really needed this magazine to disappear. My suspicion, though perhaps I’m delving into this too deeply, is that this reader was disgusted not with the imagery itself, but with his or her urge to look at these pictures. Perhaps they thought that by destroying the pictures, they would be able to also destroy their desire. But of course it doesn't work that way.

Read the entire article here
Source: dazeddigital.com