Selected works by Markus Selg

Markus Selg
Vorahnung (Premonition)

2010

Piezo print on paper

37 x 49.5 cm

Markus Selg’s myth-based work dares the viewer to reconsider contemporary art as all-encompassing, immersive and universal. His printmaking, sculpture and video-based practice is infused with recurring themes from world art history, and merges traditional craft and technology to re-spiritualise the role of the artist within a contemporary context.

Markus Selg
Angelus

2010

Piezo print on paper

49.5 x 39.5 cm

Selg works in unusual self-isolation from his times quite literally: the artist has retreated into the woods in order to work, donning the role of the traditional craftsman and exploring the idea of self-sufficiency that accompanies it. At the same time, Selg takes advantage of the latest computer technology to produce multi-layered images like the dreamlike Vorahnung (Premonition) and the colour-saturated Angelus (both 2010), recalling the imagery and symbolism of earlier visual traditions of the German Romantics and Expressionists.

Markus Selg
Anima

2010

Wood

100 x 30 x 30 cm

Thematically, night, nature, sex, life and death fill works such as the quasi-Biblical Traum der Sarazenin (2007) and the Gauguin-esque Searching for Ruwenzori (2010). Similar ideas around the life cycle, human loneliness and other allegorical states haunt his dramatically posed figures made out of plaster, jute, metal and wood. Mild und Leise Wie Er Lächelt (2008), which looks like a Buddhist icon, is more intricately ornamented and polished than more recent works from 2010 based on drawings, which free the figure with a more essentialised representation. Trauernde (Mourner), Betender, Eva, Anima and Abgrund (Abyss) show the artist continuing a three-dimensional shedding process and a tendency towards rustication, seen in the roughly-hewn Bench (Tiger) and Chair (Hanush) (all 2010).

Markus Selg
Abgrund (Abyss)

2010

Wood

110 x 26 cm

The imagery in the works shown here is inspired by life and creation. When asked about the imperfections embedded in them, Selg refers to the sense of almost spiritual, single wholeness permeating his practice. ‘All of The Creation is perfect…The less you care about form and the more you are able to follow your intuition, the closer you can get to a truth, which is not only following the outer world. The cardinal example of a Gesamtkunstwerk is life itself.’

Markus Selg
Bench (Tiger)

2010

Collaboration with Astrid Sourkova, Wood

80 x 120 x 38 cm
Markus Selg
Chair (Hanush)

2010

Collaboration with Astrid Sourkova, Wood

88 x 64 x 24 cm
Markus Selg
Mild und leise wie er lächelt (Mild and quiet as he smiles)

2008

Metal, Wood, Straw, Plaster, Shellac

150 x 38 x 34 cm
Markus Selg
Eva

2010

Plaster, wood, jute, metal

95 x 26 x 26 cm / 88 x 33 x 33 cm (pedestal)
Markus Selg
Searching For Ruwenzori

2010

Sublimation print on fabric

195 x 260 cm
Markus Selg
Installation Shot





Markus Selg
Betender

2009

Plaster,straw, jute, metal, wood

Artwork: 86 x 20 x 47 cm Plinth: 85 x 60 x 60 cm
Markus Selg
Trauernde

2008

Plaster, straw, jute, metal, shellac

Artwork: 125 x 30 x 30 cm Plinth: 62 x 36 x 36 cm
Markus Selg
Traum der Sarazenin

2007

Sublimation print on fabric

240 x 350 cm

Articles

MARKUS SELG AT VILMA GOLD, BY OSSIAN WARD


Peering into Markus Selg's atmospheric installation through its hanging sackcloth doorway is to come blinking out of the Hackney light into the Black Forest. Or, more specifically, into the wilds and mountain ranges of the Czech Republic, where the artist lived in self-imposed retreat while whittling away at these naive pagan carvings and pieces of homespun furniture.

His neo-romantic idea of the artist as lonely backwoodsman - an almost literal translation of Nietzsche's ‹bermensch or Superman who brings forth culture from uncivilised hands - is both staggeringly authentic and highly staged. The lighting is theatrical, the primitive prints actually digitally made and everything is placed knowingly just so. Yet his primitive sculptures of an Adam and Eve coupling and two solitary, totemic idols, speak of old-fashioned handiwork and a bygone devotion to craft, a quaint notion that is backed up by Selg's epic half-hour film, 'Destiny'.

One whole wall screens the heroic tale of an artist who trudges through crisp white tundra, falls to his face in exhaustion and then miraculously rouses himself back to life. There's more than a whiff of Werner Herzog to the beautiful, glacial imagery, the accompanying arias and his impressive attempt to truly inhabit the outlander persona (turns out Selg has shown alongside Herzog), all of which adds to the immersive theatre of the show, topped off by a pair of rustic, charred wooden boxes containing glowing dioramas of biblical, backlit skies awaiting their miniature players.

The second room doesn't quite reach the same heights, through its repetition of the penitent video bench and retro prints, but stays on the right side of 'Blair Witch Project' spookiness. Selg aptly titles the show 'A New Beginning', because not only is he the heir to German expressionism and the origin myths of Anselm Kiefer, but he also offers a way out of such stylistic cul-de-sacs of the past. A true Renaissance man, or as they say in German, an Allroundtalent.

Source: timeout.com