•  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
Saatchi Art
Saatchi Store
Current Exhibition

EXHIBITED AT THE SAATCHI GALLERY

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Martin Maloney
(left) Sex Club (Cocktail), (right) Sex Club (Blow Job)

1998/1998

Oil on canvas/ Oil on canvas

274.3 x 914.4 cm/274.3 x 609.6 cm
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Martin Maloney
Equal Opportunities

1999

Oil on Canvas

274.5 x 305 cm
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Martin Maloney
Soni Levi

1997

Oil on canvas

173.5 x 298 cm
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Martin Maloney
Sex Club (M&S-S&M)

1998

Oil on canvas

274.3 x 609.6 cm
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Martin Maloney
Sex Club (Cowboys)

1998

Oil on canvas

274.3 x 609.6 cm
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Martin Maloney
Sleeping Arrangements

1997

Oil on canvas

167.5 x 297 cm
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Martin Maloney
Rave (After Poussin's Triumph of Pan)

1997

Oil on canvas

244 x 457 cm
Rave is a contemporary version of the seventeenth-century painting, borrowing both subject and composition. Transforming the master’s racy orgy scene (women, men, goats going for it under the hypnotic influence of horn music – painted with the very epitome of tasteful credential), Martin Maloney’s vision of a wild club night of Y-fronted-pantied dancers, and casual snogging seems positively tame. His intentional casual painting style transforms classic mythological high art into a tangible, intimately concerning scene for today .
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Martin Maloney
Saplings

2004

Oil on canvas

244 x 213 cm
Martin Maloney’s collages operate like magazine imagery; fun is idealized by groups of people hanging out. Attention is always paid to the things that count: clothing, hairstyles, radios, and pets. But Maloney’s product placement seems more like evidence of unfulfilment than success.
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Martin Maloney
Stroller

2004

Oil on canvas

260 x 231 cm
Martin Maloney makes social observation paintings, trendy and casual, like jeans ads, or thirty-something sitcoms. His anecdotal scenes are contemporary adaptations of the type of genre paintings, still life’s and portraits seen in historical paintings from artists such as Poussin, Vermeer, and Watteau.
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Martin Maloney
Cul de Sac

2004

Oil on canvas

213 x 260 cm
He presents cheery views of life in the singles scene: humorous, awkward, and seductive despite the flaws. Maloney paints 30-somethings in a style that is smart-casual; layered references to art history patched together in faux-naïf. Rendered with all sincerity, Maloney injects a little bit of tragedy into PC-inspired happiness.
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Martin Maloney
Public Sculpture

2004

Oil on canvas

213 x 260 cm
Painting versions of people he’s seen on the street, in his neighbourhood, in his grocery store, Maloney places them in delightful pastoral situations which both mirror and lovingly mock en vogue circumstance and fancy. His messy painting style is comically accurate, his figures are all too familiar, each one with an imagined personality and history completely unique to them
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Martin Maloney
Planters

2004

Oil on canvas

260 x 213 cm
The urban landscape of London artist Martin Maloney is one that is colourful and matter-of-fact, not grey and grim. One could almost say defiantly cheerful. Maloney is an instinctive painter whose works display a vibrancy through much use of patterning and decoration.
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Martin Maloney
Candy

2004

Oil on canvas

259.7 x 213.4 cm
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Martin Maloney
Slade Gardens, SW9, 1995

2001

Vinyl collage

305 x 792 cm
With his first foray into large-scale collage, Martin Maloney replicates painting with thousands of individual pieces cut from coloured sticky-backed vinyl. He shares the secret of paint: a large pink mass for a face, a splotch of white and a line of yellow for a highlight, two semicircles of blue for eyeshadow. Loads of little stringy bits clumped together make a shaggy dog. This leisurely day in the park just isn’t as easy as it looks: this process is as intricate and labour intensive as assembling a Ravenna mosaic.
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Martin Maloney
Cat Painting

1999

Oil on canvas

275 x 305 cm
Martin Maloney has a directness in making the complexity of colour relationships normally associated with abstraction come to life through figuration. He focuses on ordinary but significant details that are simply described with spontaneity and uninhibited pleasure.
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Martin Maloney
Hey Good Looking (After Poussin's The Choice of Hercules)

1998

Oil on canvas

245 x 336 cm
Martin Maloney’s Hercules is one hot stud: Rod Stewart hair, chest merkin and red Speedos. Like in Poussin’s allegory, he’s pulled two birds, Vice and Virtue, and now has to make a choice. He’s already in like Flynn with Vice: a hot-tomato single mum with Christina Aguilera’s taste in clothes. But his eyes are leaning towards the Olivia Newton-John goody-goody – she’s gonna be no easy task. It’s Maloney’s contemporary twists that make this painting especially funny: Poussin’s finely rendered drapery is substituted with a beach towel, Vice’s sweet cherub’s transformed into a latchkey brat. A little divine romance for the high street.

ARTICLES

Spotlight - Martin Maloney

“We’ve lived through 150 years of people draining color from our lives. People think that color is light-hearted, not serious. But what’s the opposite? Gloom, doom – why would any one want that?” Why indeed seems to ask Martin Maloney picking up David Hockney’s rhetorical question.

Painted in an affected but effectively amateurish style, the 17 imaginary portraits of imaginary people that comprise Maloney’s show, seem to rejoice in their bright and simple colours.

Maloney has taken inspiration from Watteau and Chardin. “I have called the exhibition ‘Genre Painting.’ Traditionally these were cute little scenes from life, where the event and the person were of equal importance. In the seventeenth century, Dutch and Spanish artists painted people around the house doing things.” All this has been well digested and direct quotes have been carefully avoided. Nonetheless Maloney has sought to update a moribund tradition in an attempt to render contemporary the classic subject matter of leisure life. The result is magazine art. It has happened before. In the eighties Malcom MacLaren popularized a new dance style that took direct inspiration from Vogue. Maloney goes one step further. He takes his cue from the more populistic Hello! magazine. Accordingly the works’ titles are borrowed from popular culture, movies, and daytime TV: Easy Reader, the Big Breakfast…The imperative remains the same: “Strike the pose.”

His clueless characters surround themselves with props: a TV set, a cat, a walkman…Judging by the limp limbs, complete with stretched hands and awkwardly contorted feet, they do not know how to operate them or even engage with them. Indeed there is not much you can do with an unplugged vacuum cleaner (Hoover Deluxe) still that is not a real matter for concern. The objects’ utility is discarded in favor of their decorative appeal. Everything remains on the surface. What you see is what you get. Ordinary gestures, like putting away clothes or frying eggs, are emphatically re-enacted as if responding to some photo call. And yet, these figures are not even idle. They look like the honorary members of some special people’s club, a fantasy projection of a child trying to imaging his or hers own grown up life. In this, the paintings share the same philosophy of 50s’ teenage girl magazines with their domestic tips. The hair, the clothes, the shirts are all carefully selected. The subjects look immaculate in their effort to play their role and yet they remain hopelessly isolated, striving for attention and seeking companionship in the paraphernalia of contemporary life. The mundane becomes a cause for fascination and gives an identity, however fake, to the characters. They dream in Technicolor.

Gianmarco Del Re
No195, Flash Art International, pp.135

Read the entire article here
Source: flashartonline.com