Selected works by Max Frisinger

Max Frisinger
Noah's Ark (CocoRosie)

2010

Steel, glass, wood, mixed media

246 x 272.5 x 105 cm

Max Frisinger’s raised glass cases – assemblages crammed with found material – are witty visual paradoxes, governed by a dual sense of cacophony and order. They demand careful observation, with each side like an entry point, revealing a different topography made up of found scraps – metal, wood, tubing, table legs, plastic tubs, offcuts and other broken designs – all random-looking but somehow perfectly framed around each other and their spatial limitations.

Frisinger’s works juxtapose apparent chaos with a careful sense of arrangement, and flirt with an art historical understanding of perspective, representation and abstraction. Depending on the viewer’s point of view, the objects within these three-dimensional boxes may appear to be independent from each other, or unified and flattened, like abstract paintings.

Max Frisinger
Rising (Yoko Ono)

2010

Steel, glass, wood, mixed media

246 x 272.5 x 105 cm

Noah’s Ark (CocoRosie) (2010), a vitrine chock full of mismatched shapes, is striking for the complex imagery that rises out of its superimposed objects and the gaps left between them. Rising (Yoko Ono) (2010) shows a somewhat axial arrangement suggesting kineticism despite its crammed, impossibly static nature.

When asked about his works and the development of his practice, Frisinger simply states: ‘inveni, vidi, vici’ (‘I found, I saw, I conquered’). His assemblages can be seen to be making reference to the tradition of refuse-based art, recycling detritus to comment on the society of excess. Looming over Frisinger’s new time-capsules of the everyday are the ghosts of found-object sculptures by Marcel Duchamp and Jean Tinguely, Arman’s ‘accumulations’ and Daniel Spoerri’s ‘snare pictures’, as well as a poetic playfulness, somewhere between Joseph Cornell and the musical, performative improvisation of Fluxus.

But Frisinger’s boxes, like portable, flat-pack dumpsters, contain not just a nod to the past, but an up-to-date comment on our current culture of waste and excess in society in general but perhaps also within the art world.


Articles

ARTIFACTS:THE FRIEZE ART FAIR: SALVAGE INSTINCT
October 15, 2010, By Linda Yablonsky, NY Times

Trend-spotters at the Frieze Art Fair this week had an easy time finding the next big thing: the artist as clutter queen. During a V.I.P. preview attended by Keith Richards as well as the mega-collectors Dasha Zhukova, Steven Cohen and Charles Saatchi, I saw so much junk repurposed as found-object sculpture that I actually mistook a pair of fire extinguishers for an artwork. But when I reached the stand of Berlin’s Contemporary Fine Art, and a friend blurted a telltale alert – “What the hell is that!” – I knew we were onto something big.
We were peering into a standing glass case that the artist Max Frisinger had crammed with wood scraps, foam, colorful plastic tubing, bits of rusting machinery, what might have been an ironing board and God knows what else into a jungle of detritus. Seen from one side, it looked like the back or inside of a closet, except that it doubled as the outside or the front. Though it existed in three dimensions, it could also be read as a two-dimensional abstract painting. I’d call that a perceptual coup.

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Source: nytimes.com


DER JÄGER DES ENTSORGTEN SCHATZES NÄCHTLICHE STREIFE MIT DEM BREMER KÜNSTLER MAX FRISINGER: AUF DER SUCHE NACH DINGEN, DIE ZU KUNST WERDEN SOLLEN VON SEBASTIAN MANZ




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Source: Contemporary Fine Arts Berlin / Weser Kurier paper / 29 May 2009


MAX FRISINGER ESSAY FROM CONTEMPORARY FINE ARTS BERLIN




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Source: Contemporary Fine Arts Berlin