Selected works by Nicola Frimpong

Nicola Frimpong
The Accidental Birth of Nicola- I Should of Been Born a ***

2012

Watercolour on paper

30 x 21 cm

There’s a close relationship between drawing and writing, and it follows that drawing on a small scale has echoes of the diary entry, something designed for an audience of one. There’s something of the diary about Nicola Frimpong’s work, not just in its frank exploration of the darker reaches of the human psyche, but in its combination of informality and intensity. In Frimpong’s Untitled (White Slaves), a kind of historical revisionist fantasy is played out in a theatre (a hint at the heightened nature of Frimpong’s narrative).

Nicola Frimpong
I Feel So Ugly

2012

Watercolour on paper

30 x 21 cm

A cage sits onstage, occupied by beefy and well-hung naked white men, as an audience of exclusively black heads look on, having apparently thrown rotten vegetables at them; a small group of auctioneers approach and prepare to make a sale. There’s a comic absurdity to the vision: her white slaves are parodies of teenage lust, as fresh-faced and toned as members of a boy band.

Nicola Frimpong
Untitled (White Slaves)

2012

Watercolour on paper

30 x 21 cm

Frimpong’s drawing has some of Henry Darger’s combination of delicate colouring belying a disturbing, sexually suggestive content, minus Darger’s outsider disregard for the viewer’s sensibility. Frimpong seems determined to rattle the cage, peppering her drawings with images of dismembered bodies, sexual depravity and grotesque tortures. In some senses, Frimpong’s approach to art has the self-reflexive qualities of an actor playing a part; in .The Accidental Birth of Nicola – I Should of been Born a Boy, the displacement of the title is enacted in fantasies of male beauty and sexual prowess. As in a diary, so in the mind: nothing is held back.

Nicola Frimpong
Untitled

2013

Watercolour on paper

30 x 21 cm
Nicola Frimpong
Untitled

2013

Watercolour on paper

30 x 21 cm
Text by Ben Street

Articles

BLOOMBERG NEW CONTEMPORARIES- PART 2
October 31st 2012, by Adams Covell, Celluloid Wicker Man Wordpress

The melting pot of influences that come into making art are more honestly bore in the work of artists in their early stages. Continuing a look at the work in the New Contemporaries exhibition housed in Copperas Hill, these influences and likenesses seem unavoidable but pleasing to interpret (whether correct or not).
Nicola Frimpong’s collection of untitled watercolours, present a violent sexuality through a filter of childlike naivety. At once they recall a darker and more vicious Quentin Blake crossed with the subversive nature of album cover artist Stanley Donwood. The pictures show various forms of sexual activity which increase in dominance and violence juxtaposed weirdly with the style of a child’s sketch. At first the pictures seem whimsical and quaint, only seeming dark and voyeuristic on a closer inspection. In some ways they remind of Patrick Bateman’s doodles found at the end of American Psycho; a dark and necessary release in a deliberately primitive but effective format.

Source: celluloidwickerman.com


SOMETHING YOU SHOULD SEE… BLOOMBERG NEW CONTEMPORARIES AT THE ICA
November 26th, 2012, by Eri Otite

It’s that time of year again, when the annual showcase of ‘hot young things’ in the art world returns to London’s ICA. The Bloomberg New Contemporaries show presents the best work from up-and-coming talent across a variety of mediums and since 1949, has been one of the major open-submission exhibitions in the UK. It provides a platform for young artists at the start of their professional careers to show their work to the public and previous illustrious exhibitors include David Hockney, Anish Kapoor, Grayson Perry, Tacita Dean and Damien Hirst – so this touring exhibition has a knack for spotting future names of contemporary art.

Selectors this year have picked 29 finalists, from over 1,200 submissions, to give us a ‘sneak peek’ of the future. The artists, either new or recent graduates and final year students, all hail from art institutions across the UK. Participating contributors include Nicola Frimpong who uses watercolour and coloured inks to explore the themes of violence, hatred and sexuality; and Bryan Dooley who spent weeks photographing New York University’s running team for his Trak Star series.

Source: theculturalexpose.co.uk