•  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
Saatchi Art
Saatchi Store
Current Exhibition

SELECTED WORKS BY Nicolas Deshayes

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Nicolas Deshayes
Soho Fats

2012

Polystyrene, aluminium, powdercoated steel and fixings

Dimensions variable
Nicholas Deshayes finds painterliness in the manmade, and his works hover somewhere between two different kinds of making: the organically gestural and the industrially produced. His works operate in what he calls “the threshold between liquid and solid”, and the contrasts in his work – roiled against levelled surfaces, the heat of production against cool of presentation – are a way of examining the relationship of humanity to the materials with which it surrounds itself. The title of Soho Fats, a series of five white panels mounted on floor-to-ceiling handrails, refers to the congealed human fats found in central London sewers; by using polystyrene, a non-biodegradable plastic familiar from packaging, Deshayes draws parallels between the human subject and its residual traces. Cutting into the surface with a hot wire cutter, Deshayes evokes both the bodily remainder and rippling water of the hidden core of the city. Deshayes’ interest in plastics is a reminder of both their human usage and human associations; their carbonic origins are our own.
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Nicolas Deshayes
Acids (1)

2012

Anodised aluminium, vacuum formed plastic

110 x 170 cm
In Acids, Deshayes places framed sections of vacuum formed plastic on sheets of anodized aluminium. The aluminium, apparently stained with blanched purples, greens and ochres, recalls the sloshed skeins of abstract colour in a Rothko painting, here generated through the chemical activity of the metal, not the individual gesture of the artist. The plastic – mottled and creased like elderly skin – seems both churning with motion and frozen, stilled. Industrially produced, physically distant from the artist, Deshayes’ works still can’t help recall the human body, its frailties and residues.
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Nicolas Deshayes
Acids (3)

2012

Anodised aluminium, vacuum formed plastic

110 x 170 cm
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Nicolas Deshayes
Sebums (c)

2012

Anodised aluminium, vacuum formed plastic

110 x 71 x 8 cm
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Nicolas Deshayes
Sebums (d)

2012

Anodised aluminium, vacuum formed plastic

110 x 71 x 8 cm
Text by Ben Street

ARTICLES

Artist of the Week 133: Nicolas Deshayes
April 2011, by Skye Sherwin, The Guardian

This young artist slickly sculpts the modern surfaces of coffee-shop chains, fantasy kitchens and public conveniences.
Nicolas Deshayes's installations tap into a modern wipe-clean world, designed to withstand sweat, food, shit or any other substance our messy corporeality might leak or spew. This young artist is interested in the surfaces of coffee-shop chains, fantasy kitchens, architect's offices and public conveniences, and his work is made from materials familiar from these very 21st-century phenomena: plastic, laminated hardboard and buffed industrial sheets of metal.
Yet in spite of its slick appearance, Deshayes's work is always ready to remind us of the human factor. In Public Work 1 & 2, a pair of stainless steel wall sculptures could be a cool minimalist creation but actually look just like a men's urinal, and bear clear vinyl stickers in the shape of a gush of urine. There's a bodily dimension too. He frequently uses vacuum-forming, the industrial process used to mould everything from coffee cups to bus seats, but his works are less easy to place than these everyday creations. Deshayes's rippling forms could equally recall Zaha Hadid's biomorphic architecture, discarded skin or, as in a gleaming red panel from his recent Runner, toxic sludge and the kind of bloody slop produced by a decimated vampire in hit TV show True Blood.


Read the entire article
Source: guardian.co.uk


Emerging...Nicolas Deshayes
Jan 2012, by Jack Mills, Wonderland Magazine

Hoxton’s Galleries Goldstein will be hosting a one-off exhibition called Hotel Palenque from 6.30pm, whereby invitee Nicolas Deshayes will exhibit the newest of his typically culture-critical installments – his past works have, in various manifestations, laid bare capitalist society’s messy excesses. The France-born artist and exhibition curator Elise Lammer offer Wonderland a taste of what to expect at tonight’s show, which runs until 9.30pm.
Nicolas and Elise, what mediums will be explored for the show? What will it examine?
Elise: I invited Nicolas to realise Hotel Palenque’s fourth commission. Each commission is presented in a different exhibition space during a one-night event according to a simple set of rules. Firstly, the work must be produced or reproduced to an A0 format, and secondly all digital files and associated materials must be destroyed prior to the work being shown.
Nicolas: In response to Elise’s invitation, I will be showing a single A0 photocopy that will be freshly wallpaper pasted onto the outer-side of the gallery window. From the street it will appear like a ubiquitous lo-fi poster – in keeping with the area’s widely visible fly-poster advertising – but pasted with its front facing inwards the image will only be seen from the inside of the gallery space

Read the entire article
Source: wonderlandmagazine.com

Exhibit A | Supplement by Nicolas Deshayes
March 2011, by Skye Sherwin, Another Mag

Food photography is a deceptive business. To create the gelatinous, juicy-looking glazes and succulent hues necessary to truly whet a reader’s appetite, the food stylist must employ ingredients you wouldn’t put down your neck in a hurry. Shower gel, engine oil and wood stain are amongst the behind-the-scenes secrets of those mouth-watering Sunday supplement images.
Rising young art star Nicolas Deshayes has fully embraced the process in his recreations of lifestyle magazine cookery pages, Supplement 1-9 series. The delights he offers us include the velvety rumples of an artichoke’s leaves, a crisped coating of toasted parmesan clinging to an oyster shell and the glimmering skin of a silvery grilled fish. Deshayes presents these glutinously rich, queasily sexual images on book-like aluminium supports: hard, brittle lightweight skins. It’s a perusal of surface and substance that riffs on different notions of taste, of the mind and the mouth, and what is forever being lost in between.

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Source: anothermag.com

Nicolas Deshayes
Sept 2011, by R Clark, Expect Delays

Interested in mass produced surfaces, Nicolas Deshayes explores human and synthetic combinations. In a society obsessed with mechanical perfection and wipe clean surfaces, he adopts a minimalist outlook to provide us with sculptures comprising of familiar materials.
Public Work (1) 2009 insinuates bodily functions, with stains dripping down an ambiguous stainless steel structure attached to the wall, its’ presence undecided as urinal or utility. The gushing urine is actually depicted using vinyl stickers. Deshayes work exists thanks to vacuum-forming: an industrial process used to mould objects more commonly associated with plastic everyday creations, he expresses natural physicality crossing paths with technology.

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Source: expectdelays.co.uk

Nicolas Deshayes: Noble Island
By Rebecca Hunter, Interface

The title of Nicolas Deshayes’ first solo exhibition at the brand new artist-run Moot Gallery is taken from HG Wells’ dystopian novel The Island of Dr Moreau, evoking sinister attempts to contain, control and evolve nature, splicing and combining to create hybrid creatures with horrific results.

With this in mind, Deshayes’ five sculptures appear to hold captive something spawned in a meeting of curiously selected members. Rock is a smoothed imitation of a 2000-year-old artefact with a slick coating of car body paint. This almost-fusion results in an aura of dignified sci-fi, also recalling polished metallic minimalism. Vernaculex collages rococo-painted pigs’ trotters, nautical rope and metal into a fractured column.

Each piece feels like a strange object for study, a highly finished aid to learning, as one might come across in a classroom or museum. Although there is no set lesson, there is a sense of discovering something for, or in, oneself in the effort to synthesise the separate and sometimes jarring elements contained within one piece. However, the complex cross-referencing of so many periods, art movements, processes and materials hinders the enjoyment of Deshayes’ real gift, which is visual and sensual. Rather than merely presenting us with half-destroyed golems of cultural history, there is a classical purity to be found in the circles, cylinders, cuboids and cones that form the underlying structure of each object. The cleanly crafted Element, a perfectly cylindrical and evenly coloured model log screwed to a plain metal support, could almost be a scientist’s dull cast of a fossilised specimen, ready for display in a museum of natural history. Yet the contour is too regular to have been derived exclusively from nature.

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Source: a-n.co.uk