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  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
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  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
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Current Exhibition

SELECTED WORKS BY Nobuko Tsuchiya

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Nobuko Tsuchiya
..."quietly now"...

2003

mixed media

60 x 64 x 28 cm
Nobuko Tsuchiya’s assemblages are primitive inventions. Antennae, rags, plastic tubing, and an old pair of shoes stand in for the workings of hi-tech equipment, their functions as obscure as some of the objects which compose them
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Nobuko Tsuchiya
Table Rabbit

2003

mixed media

160 x 270 x 160 cm
It’s this design element of Nobuko Tsuchiya’s work which is most alluring. Each sculpture revels in its impoverished minimalism, almost zen-like its poetic accuracy, while at the same time alluding to an ancient and un-evolved Japanese Pop.
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Nobuko Tsuchiya
Sister of Nike

2004

mixed media

160 x 100 x 100 cm
Sister of Nike could be a satellite dish, Your Chair an atomically fuelled cartoon prank, and Table Rabbit has something just a little too Hello Kitty™ about it.
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Nobuko Tsuchiya
... with an asparagus pillow ...

2003

mixed media

104.5 x 90 x 42 cm
Formed from spindly make-shift pipes and air ducts, there’s something sinister underlying Nobuko Tsuchiya’s Luddite cutesy-ness.
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Nobuko Tsuchiya
Parking Fish Project

2003

mixed media

77 x 36 x 43 cm
Haywire tubes feeding to and from dishes of mysterious liquid, ‘electronic’ connections held together with wooden clothes pegs, and vials suspended with bits of string: there’s an overwhelming possibility that her experiments might explode at any moment.
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Nobuko Tsuchiya
Your Chair

2003

mixed media

50 x 176 x 50 cm
“Not everything is as it appears in my work, not everything is done on purpose. My decisions are made by using what you could call a different form of thinking, and are made to operate between harmony and discord, control and the lack of it. I always try to develop the conversation between the things in my work and myself. Maybe this sounds idiotic, but it is my honest feeling."
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Nobuko Tsuchiya
They Jumped

2003

mixed media

76 x 97 x 40 cm
Nobuko Tsuchiya "different form of thinking" and quietly dramatic feel for her materials result in works that are at once threatening and beguiling.
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Nobuko Tsuchiya
... once upon a time ...

2003

mixed media

74 x 70 x 46 cm
Each sculpture revels in its impoverished minimalism, almost zen-like its poetic accuracy, while at the same time alluding to an ancient and un-evolved Japanese Pop.

ARTICLES

The Conceptual Art Of Nobuko Tsuchiya
Aug 20, 2008, by Paul Black, Suite 101

Nobuko Tsuchiya is an up-and-coming London artist. Here she explains the fascinating process behind her art and some of the key works that she has developed thus far
NT: My work is an accumulation of decisions made by using different forms of thinking; linguistic, musical, logical, sensual, sensory, and experiential or something I can’t quite define.I am trying to make the work as complex as I can, pruning elements as much as possible until I reach a point between balance and unbalance. I think I am not trying something specifically like making poetry or rhythm consciously, I just want the viewers to find themselves through my work.
PB: It is as if a scientist could use a micro-spectrometer in the ‘reading’ of your art, searching out the potential for hidden chemical, physical, and even biological properties, potentially creating a kind of subatomic poetry. You mentioned that you were making larger work?
NT: I’ve just found a nice shape from a blow-up children’s swimming pool, It’s already big, the work will therefore be in scale. The journey that was once "microbial" as you’ve put it may well be an actual journey of sorts. I don’t yet know how the finished work will be.

PB: The narrative that you transpose from your own inherent and involuntary reactions and snippets from of memory, seem to result in an emotional topography. The sculptures become a conglomeration of feelings made "animal" with their own internal workings made visible, so the viewer may encounter the microcosmic at first hand and travel between delicate vessels and indurate mechanisms. Could you tell me more about the use of narrative texts and memories of childhood in relation to your work?
NT: Some materials allow me to recall something of the past, to draw out feelings and memories through their manipulation, other materials take me to the future. I treat these physical and imaginative aspects equally, combining and recombining them until I’m able to construct a story embedded within an object. So childhood memories naturally come into my work during the process.
PB: There is almost a maternal aspect to your relationship with materials, where the works almost become like children. One could almost imagine that your studio takes on the role of a pseudo-nest for emotional hatchlings. It is as if you perceive your sculpture as pets or infants, as your very own "white cube" Tamagotchi’s?
NT: I feel materials are like magnets, they draw up energies and pull some part of myself into the work, and sometimes they make me surprised, sometimes make me tired. I can say they are like my friends, I even feel flattered, but the works aren’t really like children, not in the sense of feeling. Because children often upset their parents, don’t they? ...or was that just me?
Nobuko Tsuchiya is represented by the Anthony Reynold's Gallery, London UK

Read the entire article
Source: suite101

PICTURE PERFECT
From decadent painters to death-defying video-makers, Adrian Searle introduces the undiscovered artists who will colour the future

Nobuko Tsuchiya
Age: 32

What she does: Japanese artist Nobuko Tsuchiya came to London in 2001 and has been showing at Anthony Reynolds Gallery since completing a postgraduate course at Goldsmith's College. She makes alarming, delicate sculptures with titles such as Insect Surgery Machine, Catheter and Parking Fish Project, using old chair frames, saucepans and whisks, dismantled lamps and what looks like hi-tech medical detritus. Her highly wrought agglomerations have an air of lab experiments, yet they are also images, their titles leading us to view the work in relation to the body, to animal behaviour, to sexuality. Although she shows in Japan, she has no plans to leave London.

She says: "Not everything is as it appears in my work, not everything is done on purpose. My decisions are made by using what you could call a different form of thinking, and are made to operate between harmony and discord, control and the lack of it. I always try to develop the conversation between the things in my work and myself. Maybe this sounds idiotic, but it is my honest feeling."

Read the entire article
Source: guardian.co.uk