Selected works by Paul McCarthy

Paul McCarthy
Chocolate Silicone Blockhead

1999

Silicone

110 x 91 x 69 cm
Paul McCarthy grew up surrounded by the omnipresent language and imagery of American consumer culture. Paul McCarthy distorts and mutates familiar forms; they take on a carnivalesque and disquieting theme, blurring the line between the grotesque and a circus like spectacle.

Articles

Paul McCarthy - Other Resources - The Saatchi Gallery

Paul Mccarthy

Articles about Paul McCarthy

Paul McCarthy, Exhibition History

By Dan Cameron, Senior Curator
Paul McCarthy's role as purveyor of difficult truths has made his work shocking and incomprehensible to many viewers. This has put McCarthy in an unusual position -- he is a well-known mid-career artist with an evolution that is heavily shrouded in myth and innuendo. As a result, the innovative aspects of his work, as well as its historical roots, have tended to be overlooked.

Initially trained as a painter, McCarthy began experimenting with film in 1967 and produced a large number of photographic works through the late 1960s and early 1970s. Mountain Bowling (1969) begins as a performance-like action in the wild, captured by a nearby camera, revealing a droll naturalism that downplays the obvious physical danger inherent in this pseudo-sport. Many of the works that followed probe the fissure between what the eye perceives and how the brain deduces the "truth" of a disorienting situation. In Inverted Hallway and Inverted Room (both 1970), McCarthy juxtaposes identical views of the same space, one upside down, to give the impression that one space depicted has been constructed with every feature inverted. Read the entire article here Source: www.newmuseum.org

Paul McCarthy
Interviewed by Graham Ramsay & John Beagles

US artist Paul McCarthy was taking a break from the final adjustments to the installation of his first major retrospective show in the UK, at the Tate Liverpool. We joined him for a drink, along with Tracey Ruddell from the Press Office.

Graham Ramsay/John Beagles: How do you feel about the way your work is written about, specifically in terms of [Julia] Kristeva, ‘the abject’ and that whole psychoanalytical take on it? It sometimes feels like a way for the writers to make your work intellectually respectable to themselves.

Paul McCarthy: It kind of goes both ways, there are people who just dismiss the work and just talk about it as being abject and not trying to analyse it, but just being dismissive. Then there are writers who are more analytical about it. I’m into it both ways because that’s kind of how it’s made. I’m not trying to make it psychoanalytical but then at the same time...

GR/JB: We were reading a non-too-flattering article about your work by Donald Kuspit in which he accused you and Mike Kelley of lacking critical distance. Over the last ten years there have been a lot of artists who have also been accused of this. Artists who have wanted to have some critical purchase but at the same time have stressed their own entanglement and immersion within their subject.

PM: I remember that Donald Kuspit article and I was kind of into it, I was thinking this is pretty interesting (Laughter). Read the entire article here Source: www.variant.randomstate.org
 

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