•  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
30th anniversary
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Current Exhibition

Paula Rego EXHIBITED AT THE SAATCHI GALLERY

The Fitting
Paula Rego
The Fitting

1989

Acrylic on canvas-backed paper

132 x 183 cm    52 x 72''
The Maids
Paula Rego
The Maids

1987

Acrylic on canvas-backed paper

213 x 244 cm
The story at the heart of the painting came to Paula Rego ready-made in the form of Jean Genet’s play The Maids (1947), itself based on the real-life case of the Papin sisters, Christine and Lea, who worked as maids for a rich Parisian family. One day, frightened for no apparent reason other than that of a power cut which inconvenienced and possibly frightened the sisters, they brutally murdered the mother and daughter of the family while the man of the house was out at work. In working with the story, Paula Rego seems to have focused on the unnatural closeness of the sisters, both to each other and the mother and daughter they murder. Ambiguity and menacing psychosis reverberate within the picture, much of it carried in the objects with which the room is claustrophobically furnished. And isn’t there something uncertain about the sexuality of the seated figure?
The Fitting
Paula Rego
The Fitting

1989

1989, Acrylic on canvas backed paper

183 x 132 cm
Born in Portugal, Paula Rego’s work always has a sense of magical realism; quirky contemporary mythologies pointing to an underlying psychology and sexuality, through a feminine view point. The Fitting is a scene of fairytale romance turned nightmare. Reminiscent of Velasquez’ Las Meninas, Paula Rego uses loaded imagery and symbolism to create a surreal mystery for the unravelling.
The Family
Paula Rego
The Family

1988

1988, Acrylic on canvas backed paper

213 x 213 cm
In The Family the absent father and husband returns to the picture plane, only to be manhandled by his daughter and his wife. As usual, the narrative clues are ambiguous, and the story could have several endings. Are the women helping the man or hurting him? Who is the little girl at the window? Do the clues perhaps lie in the Portuguese retablo featuring St. Joan, and St George slaying the dragon? Or in the fable of the stork and the fox illustrated beneath? Is the man as doomed as the dragon, or will he in fact resurface like the fox, to eat the stork, once it has removed the bone lodged in his throat?
Celestina's House
Paula Rego
Celestina's House

2000

2000-2001, Pastel on paper

200 x 240 cm
Paula Rego paints a world of dark fairy tale where childhood stories are thin guises for psycho-sexual intrigue and taboo, where magical realism rules, where nothing is certain except the witchy powers of feminism, and the underlying notion that nothing is as it seems.

The picture begins with the story of Celestina, a character who appears in Spanish literature in the late fifteen century. Celestina was a procuress and Paula Rego draws her as she draws all her women – tough, practical, ruthless. The picture uses the story of Celestina to explore the ages of women, although as Paula Rego wryly comments, if there are seven ages of woman as of man, then her Celestina has already lived through at least thirteen.
The Interrogator's Garden
Paula Rego
The Interrogator's Garden

2000

2000, Pastel on paper, mounted on aluminium

120 x 110 cm
Originally commissioned by the Foundation For Victims of Torture, Paula Rego’s The Interrogator’s Garden offers untold complexities. Here the soldier sits as a camp figure of lust, surrounded by the tools of his horrible trade, each one as mysterious as the symbols in the Arnofini Wedding. Paula Rego presents a softer side to her interrogator. She draws him as a romantic monster, an object of ridicule ? a symbol of decadence, weakness, and folly.
The Policeman's Daughter
Paula Rego
The Policeman's Daughter

1987

1987, Oil on canvas

213 x 152 cm
In the late 1980’s Paula Rego made a series of painting to explore close family relationships. All the relationships seem somewhat dysfunctional, particularly those between the fathers and the daughters. The Policeman’s Daughter is angry, her hand rammed into her father’s boot as she cleans it, a drawing for the painting shows its genesis in a relationship that is a little more innocent – a younger girl, cradling the boot as she cleans it, a toy castle symbolising security at her feet. In the painting, the castle has become a mistrustful cat, and the pose of the girl, taken from a sexually-explicit Robert Mapplethorpe photograph, anything but innocent.
Olga
Paula Rego
Olga

2003

2003, Pastel on paper, mounted on aluminium

160 x 120 cm
Paula Rego recalls that after the Second World War, German refugees turned up in Estoril in Portugal looking for work. Olga was taken on by a Portugese family to teach her native language to their daughter. They suspected that she had something to hide, but her secret was safe with them.
Dog Woman
Paula Rego
Dog Woman

1994

1994, Pastel on canvas

120 x 160 cm
Inspired by a story a friend had written for her, Paula Rego draws her Dog Woman in pastels, referencing the raw physicality of Degas’ drawings. “To be a dog woman is not necessarily to be downtrodden; that has very little to do with it,” She explained, “In these pictures every woman's a dog woman, not downtrodden, but powerful. To be bestial is good. It's physical. Eating, snarling, all activities to do with sensation are positive. To picture a woman as a dog is utterly believable."
Snow White Playing with her Father's Trophies
Paula Rego
Swallows the Poisoned Apple

1995

1995, Pastel on paper, mounted on aluminium

178 x 150 cm
In Swallows The Poison Apple, Paula Rego revises the tale of Snow White to expose the fallible value of youth. Dressed in traditional Disney garb, this Snow White isn’t a beautiful princess, but a middle-aged woman. Pictured moments after eating the poison apple, she lays sprawled amidst overturned furniture, suggesting painful and violent demise. Clutching her skirts, she alludes to her sexual nature, as if clinging to something slipping away. Her body lies between a blanket adorned with spring blossoms, and a sinister backdrop of red and black. Rego illustrates the conflict of reality encroaching on the socially imposed myths of female worth, construing aging as both a physical and psychological violation.
Snow White Playing with her Father's Trophies
Paula Rego
Snow White Playing with her Father's Trophies

1995

1995, Pastel on paper, mounted on aluminium

170 x 150 cm
Drawing from her own childhood memories, Paula Rego’s work illustrates corrupted folklore, where fairytale and horror converge to portray feminine experience. Recalling childhood visits to the movies with her father, Rego’s Snow White series appropriates the Disney story with unnerving fictional and autobiographical twists. In Snow White Playing With Her Father’s Trophies, Rego uses the allegory of female vanity to underlie a familial politic. The heroine, pictured in a white dress symbolising virginity and innocence, seems wryly aware of her own sexuality. Sat unladylike with legs spread, she prizes the head of a young buck between her knees, representing sexual awakening and insinuating improper affection towards her father. In the background, her stepmother kneels as aging witch, looking on with scorn and envy.
Dancing Ostriches
Paula Rego
Dancing Ostriches

1995

Pastel on paper mounted on aluminium

162 x 155 cm
They are Harpies, Homer's personified storm winds who carry the unprepared into oblivion. In the dog women series, which preceded them, there was always a story, a male presence implied though never seen. But with The Ostriches there is no story; no man (or child) is present or implied. The ostrich women may tempt or pursue men, but these are pictures of states of mind rather than narration; the most 'abstract', in the imaginative sense, of her career so far.

"I don't think there's much happiness in these pictures," says Lila Nunes, who being Portuguese nevertheless recognises their ferocity. "Some of them would eat you up. They even go out looking. The sleeping one is the safest." Her opinion of a recent article on The Ostriches is indicative: "Not bad, considering the writer wasn't Portuguese." Even the light on the pictures seems Portuguese, a storm light fit for Harpies, though they were drawn in Camden Town and done for 'Spellbound', an exhibition at the Hayward Gallery in spring 1996 to mark the centenary of British cinema.
Dancing Ostriches
Paula Rego
Dancing Ostriches

1995

Pastel on paper mounted on aluminium

150 x 150 cm
The idea of contributing to the show immediately appealed to Rego, as Disney has been an artistic influence and inspiration ever since she first sat thrilled and terrified through Snow White as a child. For 'Spellbound' she contributed pictures inspired by three of her favourite Disney films - Snow White, Pinocchio and Fantasia. It was Fantasia she concentrated on, the most abstract of Disney's films, his inspiration of famous pieces of classical music through animation.

Rego purposely did not look at the film but relied on her memory and an occasional glance at John Cluhane's illustrated history of Fantasia. In the film the ostriches perform the waking or 'Morning' sequence from Dance of the Hours, a ballet in the opera La Gioconda (The Smiling One) by Amilcare Ponchielli, first performed in 1876. Cluhane writes that in the first stages the animators made sketches of ballet dancers who were brought to the studio to perform positions and movements, "the equivalent of a model's holding poses for an artist who draws still pictures". The models were turned into birds, sometimes quite literally. As those present recalled there was "a very tall, very ostrichlike girl, and she loved doing the burlesque of the ostrich for us.We put a few feathers on her costume where ostrich feathers should appear, and a bow on her head, and she performed the routine to perfection." Rego reserves this process, turning the birds back into people.
Dancing Ostriches (triptych)
Paula Rego
Dancing Ostriches (triptych)

1995

Pastel on paper mounted on aluminium

150 x 150 cm
Lila Nunes, who has known the Willing family since she first came to nurse Victor Willing, has modelled for numerous Rego pictures. As she had done for the dog women, Rego drew the finished pictures for The Ostriches direct from Nunes' poses. This made the work especially collaborative, requiring improvisation on both sides.

"Lila has been living with my mother's fantasies for so many years that she can now add a little extra to them", says Nicholas Willing, Rego's son - himself an award-winning animator and film director. "Lila and she are very alike in their Portugueseness. It's a question of humour, a certain toughness and blunt lack of sentimentality." Using Nunes for all the ostrich women turns the eight pictures into eight frames of one figure. That is why the series only truly makes sense as one work, one women displaying a range of emotions and positions but so changed in the drawing, only those who know Numes well would recognise it. The sequential order tallies with the film, the ostriches waking up and proceeding to dance.
Dancing Ostriches (triptych)
Paula Rego
Dancing Ostriches (triptych)

1995

Pastel on paper mounted on aluminium

150 x 150 cm
After a hilarious morning selecting clothes at a specialist shop for dancers, where the shopkeeper was puzzled by their total ignorance of dress and shoe sizes, Rego and Nunes returned to the studio. "This chair is always in the middle of the studio and I just sat on it and Paula asked me to put my arms up and she did a drawing," recalls Nunes. From there, in Rego's words, "the work took on a life of its own."

Drawing transports Rego back into a childlike frame of mind because, as an only child, it was her chief solace. With The Ostriches she became so engrossed she soon discarded preliminary studies to draw Nunes directly. Awkward positions of neck, arms or legs were supported by cushions, props sometimes included in the picture. Nunes is assimilated rather than portrayed. Sometimes her head is replaced by another; and one or tow different characters creep in, particularly in the backgrounds. The ostrich women are made stockier, emphasising their ludicrous attempts to defy age and gravity, to 'fly'.

There is caustic, bucolic, peasant, even black humour in this; that fine line between comedy and tragedy. "Ballet, of course, is an abstraction in the way of movement, of story telling," Cluhane quotes T. Hee, director of the 'Hours' sequence. "Chaplin often said that he walked a tightrope with comedy on one side and tragedy on the other; if he tipped to one side, it would be tragedy; if he tipped to the other side, it would be comedy." Nicholas Willing's first reaction on seeing The Ostriches was to burst out laughing: "I thought they were the funniest things I'd ever seen. I laughed for a very long time and she laughed too - it was surprise and recognition all at once".
Dancing Ostriches (triptych)
Paula Rego
Dancing Ostriches (triptych)

1995

Pastel on paper mounted on aluminium

150 x 150 cm
What he recognised was that world of make believe, so often inspired by films, of the film-fan wanting not just to act Snow White or James Bond, but to be them. The ostrich women are trying - repeatedly, exhaustingly - to be what they never can be. Even when they are together they act in isolation, doing their own thing. Some stalk in the distance, others flop or close their eyes and dream their dreams, waiting their turn.

For Rego the figures are grotesque, a word she is careful to distinguish from caricature. Caricature is mockery; grotesque, derived from grotto, describes the dark, secret, vulnerable side of human character. Like a middle-aged aerobics class the ostrich women strive heroically against increasing odds. 'They are old fighters', which is why one falls not like the dying swan in the ballet but the sculpture of the Gallic warrior in Rome: and why others from the heraldic prow of a ship, battling through the waves.

Part of their heroism, and of the force of the pictures, is the way they admit to feelings. "The Ostriches are founded in very deep feeling. They are the result of going through a lot of feelings and getting to the essence of them," says Nunes. "I have these feelings but I'm younger and they're mixed up. Paula concentrates many feelings. It's all very connected. Maybe most people don't acknowledge certain feelings, maybe that's why they can become more difficult as they get older.
Dancing Ostriches
Paula Rego
Dancing Ostriches

1995

Pastel on paper mounted on aluminium

150 x 150 cm
Feelings almost too dark to speak of. I think women accept their feelings more than men. They're more open about them, they talk more about them with each other. A man will say: 'Everything's fine' when it isn't." This may explain why the adverse criticism of Rego's pictures has come exclusively from men.

Ideally the two drawings crowded with figures should be hung to make a doorway, a prelude to the rest. They can be interpreted equally as a chorus of ostrich women or one on her own displaying a range of postures and emotions. The left-side of the diptych describes spontaneous movement, with each figure using her dress as a prop, like actors improvising. One hides her head in shame, another holds her dress out like a net, several cradle the folds into bouquets or babies, perhaps even a dead baby in one guilty case. In the corner a vulgar duo do not seem to act at all. One leans on her thighs while to her rear the other rudely use her dress as a handkerchief, to hold or blow her nose.

In the second drawing the mood is more subdued with even a hint of nemesis or death, the rustling flock becalmed in various attitudes of exhausted anticipation. Is our time up? Asks one, through the wistful inclination of her head. Of course it is! Says a prostrate form. The manly figure on the right stands defiantly, a toreador about to face the bull; in contrast to the gesticulating lady, determined to go down in style, or the figure closet to the light source waiting in the wings, shades of a Degas dancer.
Dancing Ostriches (diptych)

Dancing Ostriches (diptych)

Paula Rego
Dancing Ostriches (diptych)

1995

Pastel on paper mounted on aluminium

162 x 155 cm
160 x 120 cm
There is a particular Iberian quality, duende, a combination of 'soul' and 'fatalism', which has no exact equivalent in English. To say a person has duende is the highest compliment. Can middle-aged women do ballet? Margot Fonteyn did. A person with duende can do anything at any age, so a lady with duende can dance anything any time. I asked Rego if the ostrich women had duende. "They have," she said grudgingly, "now and again". But The Ostriches, that is surely a masterpiece of duende.

Paula Rego's BIOGRAPHY

1934
Born in Lisbon

1945-51
Educated in St Julian's School, Carcavelos

1952-56
The Slade School of Art, London

1956-63
Lived in Ericeira, Portugal, with her husband, the painter Victor Willing, and three children

1962-63
Bursary from the Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon

1976
Settled permanently in London

1983
Visiting Lecturer in Painting Slade School of Art

1990
Appointed the First National Gallery Associate Artist

1992
Honorary Master of Art, Winchester School of Art, 12 June

1999
Honorary Doctorate of Letters, University of St. Andrews, Scotland, 24 June
Honorary Doctorate of Letters, University of East Anglia, Norwich, 8 July

2000
Honorary Doctorate of Letters, Rhode Island School of Design, USA, 3 June

2002
Honorary Doctorate of Letters, The London Institute, 23 May

2004
GrĂŁ Cruz da Ordem de Sant'Iago da Espada presented by the President of Portugal

2005
Commissioned by the Royal Mail to produce a set of Jane Eyre Stamps
Honorary Doctorate of Letters, Oxford University, June
Honorary Doctorate of Letters, Roehampton University, July

Currently lives and works in London


SOLO EXHIBITIONS



2004
Paula Rego, Serralves Museum, Oporto,
Paula Rego in Focus, Tate Britain,

2003-2004
Paula Rego, Corner 2004, Charlottenborg, Copenhagen

2003
Paula Rego – Pendle Witches, Hebden Bridge Arts Festival, Linden Mill, Hebden Bridge, N. Yorkshire, 18 June – 20 July
Jane Eyre and Other Stories, Marlborough Fine Art, London,
15 October –
22 November Paula Rego Jane Eyre, Galeria 111, Brito, Portugal, 8 November

2002
Paula Rego - Jane Eyre; Marlborough Gallery Inc., New York, 8 January – 2 February

2001
Paula Rego, Celestina’s House, Abbot Hall Art Gallery, Kendal,
11 June – 7 October, Travelling to the Yale Center for British Art, New Haven,
18 April – 30 June 2002, Together with Paula Rego - Jane Eyre
Paula Rego- Nursery Rhymes e Outras Gravuras, Parque das Nacoes, Lisbon
So desenhos Paula Rego, Fundacao Arpad Szenes-Vieira da Silva, Lisbon, 11 July – 30 September

2000
Paula Rego, Pendle Witches, Children’s Crusade and Drawings, Abbot Hall
ArtGallery, Kendal, 10 February – 12 March

1999
Paula Rego - The Children's Crusade - a suite of 12 etchings, Marlborough Graphics, London, 26 January - 27 February
Paula Rego - Recent Work, Marlborough Galeria SA, Madrid, 13 February -
27 March
Paula Rego O Crime do Padre Amaro, Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian , Lisbon, 18 May - 29 August
Open Secrets – Drawings and Etchings by Paula Rego, University Art Gallery, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, USA, 18 September – 23 October; Centre Culturel Calouste Gulbenkian, Paris, 16 November – 20 December, curated by Memory Holloway; text by Memory Holloway and Ruth Rosengarten
Children’s Crusade, Edinburgh Printmakers Workshop, 28 November – 24 December
Nursery Rhymes, White Gallery, Brighton, 21 November 1999 – 21 Jan 2000

1998
Paula Rego: Pendle Witches and Peter Pan, Midland Art Centre, 25 April –
21 May
Paula Rego – The Sins of Father Amaro, Dulwich Picture Gallery, London, 17 June -19 July
Paula Rego - Pra Lá et Pra Cá, Galerie III, Lisbon
Paula Rego – Pendle Witches, Harris Museum, 24 January – 15 March
Pendle Witches, Marlborough Galeria Madrid, 25 September – 18 October

1997
Paula Rego Retrospective exhibition, Tate Gallery Liverpool, 8 February -
13 April. Travelling to Fundação das Descobertas, Centro Cultural de Belém,
Lisbon, 15 May - 17 August, Lisbon
Nursery Rhymes, Nicosia Municipal Arts Centre, Nicosia, Cyprus, 7 -12 October. Travelling to Town Hall, Larnaca, Cyprus, 26 - 29 November.
Ainscough Gallery, 6 February – Mid March. Nodrum

1996
Nursery Rhymes, University Gallery, University of Northumbria at Newcastle

1995
Nursery Rhymes, Ty Llen, Cardiff Literature Festival (May - July)
Nursery Rhymes and Peter Pan, Annandale Galleries,
Sydney Australia; Charles Nodrum Gallery, Melbourne
Keel university.

1994
Paula Rego, Dog Women, Marlborough Fine Art, London
Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, Victoria BC, Canada

1993
Nursery Rhymes, Cheltenham Literary Festival

1992-1993
Paula Rego Peter Pan & Other Stories, Marlborough Fine Art, London
Paula Rego Peter Pan, A Suite of 15 etchings and aquatints, Marlborough
Graphics, London

1991-1992
Tales from the National Gallery, Travelling Exhibition: Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery; Middlesborough Art Gallery; Whitworth Art Gallery,
Manchester; Cooper Art Gallery, Barnsley; the National Gallery, London;
The Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle; The Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon

1991-1996
Nursery Rhymes, South Bank Centre, British Council, and Marlborough Graphics Travelling exhibition in the U.K., including: Bridport Arts Centre, Dorset; Rufford Craft Centre, Nottinghamshire; Hove Museum and Art Gallery; Vicarage Gallery, North Shields, Graphics Studio, Dublin.

1990-1991
Nursery Rhymes, British Council Travelling Exhibition in Europe

1990
Nursery Rhymes, Galeria III, Lisbon
Nursery Rhymes, Galeria Zen, Oporto

1989
Paula Rego ‑ Nursery Rhymes, Marlborough Graphics Gallery, London
Galeria III, ARCO, MadridGaleria III, Lisbon

1988
Retrospective Exhibition, Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisbon, Casa de Serralves, Oporto; the Serpentine Gallery, London

1987
Selected work 1981‑1986, Aberystwyth Arts Centre and UK tour Edward Totah Gallery, London

1985
The Art Palace, New York
Edward Totah Gallery, London

1984
South Hill Park Arts Centre, Bracknell, Midland Group, Nottingham
Edward Totah Gallery, London

1983
Arnolfini, Bristol,
Galerie Espace, Amsterdam

1982
Galeria III, Lisbon, Edward Totah Gallery, London

1981
AIR Gallery, London

1978
Galeria III, Lisbon

1977
MĂłdulo Centro Difusor da Arte, Oporto

1975
MĂłdulo Centro Difusor da Arte, Lisbon

1974
Galeria da Emenda, Lisbon

1972
Galeria Alvarez, Oporto

1971
Galeria SĂŁo Mamede, Lisbon

1965
SNBA, Lisbon


GROUP EXHIBITIONS



2005
The Pastel Society Annual Exhibition, Pastel Society, Pall Mall, 2-13 March
Only Make Believe, Compton Verney, Warwickshire, 23 March – 5 June
O Nome Que No Peito Escrito Tinhas, Alcobaça Monastery, Portugal,
Artists include: Paula Rego, JuliĂŁo Sarmento, Vasco AraĂşjo, JoĂŁo Pedro Vale and Adriana Molder. Exhibition Curated by Alexandre Melo, August
Guys’n’Dolls. Art, Science, Fashion and Relationships, Brighton Museum & Art Gallery, 23 April – 12 June

2004
Five Painters from Portuguese Modernity (1911-1965), Amadeo de Souza-Cardosa, Almada Negreiros, Maria Helena Vieira da Silva, Joaquin Rodrigo & Paula Rego, La Pedrera, Fundaçao Caixa de Catalan, Barcelona, 17 February - 16 May. Catalogue introductions by Pedro Lapa and Jaume Vidal Oliveras.
BODY. From Munch to Melgaard, Kistefos Museum, Norway, 12 May – 20 September

2003
The Enduring Image, Abbot Hall Art Gallery, Kendal
Catalogue introduction by Hannah Neale
La FĂŞte, Le Bellevue, Biarritz, Museo Valenciano de la
IllustraciĂłn y la Modernidad, Valencia, Exhibition
Curated by Solange Auzias de Turenne,
Escuela de Londres, Marlborough Madrid, Centro Cultural Caja de Granada, Puerta Real, Granada, Catalogue introduction by Fernando Huici.

2002
Belas Artes Centenary Exhibition, Lisbon
London International Small Print Biennale, Morley Gallery The Pastel Society Annual Exhibition, Mall Galleries, London, March Coming of Age – Works from the Tate Collection, The New Art Gallery, Walsall,

Metamorphing, The Science Museum, London,
Heavenly Creatures – Paula Rego and Ron Mueck, The British School at Rome,

2000-2001
British Art Show 5, Hayward Gallery, South Bank Centre Travelling exhibition
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh, Southampton City Art Gallery, National Museum of Wales,
Cardiff, Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery,
The School of London and their Friends – The Collection of Elaine and Melvin Merians, Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase,

1998
Recollection Kunstverein, Graz
Georg Herold / Albert Oehlen Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin
Selbstportraits Galerie Barbel Grasslin, Frankfurt
Fast Forward Archives Kunstverein, Hamburg

1997
Display Charlottenborg Exhibition Hall, Copenhagen

1996
On Paper II Schmidt Contemporary Art, St Louis
Peinture-Peinture Galerie Samia Saouma, Paris
Provins – Legende Museet for Samtidskunst, Roskilde

1995
Open Studio, The Florence Trust, London
Summer exhibition, Marlborough Fine Art, London
Peep, Brighton Museum in collaboration with the Institute of International
Visual Art
New Acquisitions, National Portrait Gallery, London

1994-95
An American Passion - the Summer Collection of Contemporary British Painting,
The McLellan Galleries, Glasgow; The Royal College of Art, London

1994
Unbound - Possibilities in Painting, Hayward Gallery, London
Waves of Influence (Nursery Rhymes and Peter Pan graphics), Snug Harbour Cultural Center, Statton Island, New York
Here and Now, Serpentine Gallery, London
John Murphy, Avis Newman, Paula Rego, The Saatchi Gallery, London

1993-1994
Writing on the Wall - Women Writers on Women Artists, Tate Gallery, London,
October 1993 - April 1994; travelling to the Norwich Castle Museum and the Arnolfini Gallery, Bristol

1992-1993
Innocence and Experience, Manchester City Art Galleries and South Bank Centre
Travelling Exhibition: Ferens Art Gallery, Hull; Castle Museum, Nottingham; Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow
Life into Paint: British Figurative Painting of the 20th Century, Israel Museum,
Jerusalem

1992
Myth, Dream and Fable, Angel Row Gallery, Nottingham

1991-1992
From Bacon to Now ‑ The Outsider in British Figuration, Palazzo Vecchio, Florence
The Primacy of Drawing - An Artist's View, South Bank Centre travelling
exhibition: Bristol Museum and Art Gallery; Stoke-on-Tent Art Gallery; Graves Art Gallery, Sheffield

1991
Modern Painters ‑ A Memorial Exhibition for Peter Fuller, City Art Galleries, Manchester
Triptico, Museum van Hedendaagse Kunst, Ghent

1990-1991
British Art Now: A Subjective View, British Council Travelling Exhibition, Japan
The Great British Art Exhibition, Glasgow
Eleventh International Print Biennale, Bradford

1990
Now for the Future, Hayward Gallery, London; Mappin Art Gallery, Sheffield

1989-1990
Picturing People: Figurative Art in Britain 1945 - 1989, British Council Travelling Exhibition: National Gallery, Kuala Lumpur; Hong Kong Museum of Art; National Gallery of Zimbabwe, Harare

1989
Ines de Castro, Richard Demarco Gallery, Edinburgh

1988
Works on Paper by contemporary artists, Marlborough Fine Art, London
35 Pinturas de Colecçao do Banco Portugues do Atlantico, Casa de Serralves, Oporto
Cries and Whispers, British Council Travelling exhibition, Australia
Narrative paintings, Castlefield Gallery, Manchester
Objects and Image, Aspects of British Art in the 1980's, Stoke-on-Trent Art Gallery

1987
Art Contemporáneo Portugués, Madrid
Current Affairs‑British Painting and Sculpture in the 1980s, Museum of Modern Art, Oxford, Hungary, Poland and Czechoslovakia
70 ‑ 80: Arte Portuguesa, Brazil, São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro
Alberto da Lacerdo ‑ O Mundo de un poeta, Fundação Calouste
Gulbenkian, Lisbon
30 Obras de Arte Uniao de Bancos Portugeses, Case de Serralves, Oporto
Feira do Circo, Forum Picoas, Lisbon
Exposição Amadeo Souza‑Cardoso, Casa de Serralves, Oporto
Obras de uma Colecçao Particular, Casa de Serralves, Oporto

1986
A primeira década , Módulo‑Centro Difusor da Arte, Lisbon
Le XXĂ©me au Portugal, Centre Albert Borchette, Brussels
Teira Exposiçao de Artes Plásticas, Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisbon.
AICA‑PHILAE, SNBA, Lisbon
Love Sacred and Profane, Plymouth
The Human Zoo, Nottingham Castle Museum, Nottingham
Contemporary British and Malaysian Art, National Gallery, Kuala Lumpur
Nove‑Nine Portuguese Painters, John Hansard Gallery, Southampton

1985
Passion and Power, La Mama and Gracie Mansion, New York

1985
The British Art Show, Ikon Gallery, Birmingham
Diálogo sobre arte contemporanea, Centro de Arte Moderna; Fundação Calouste
Gulbenkian, Lisbon
Bienale de Paris
Animals, Edward Totah Gallery, London
Exposição Diálogo, Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisbon
John Moores Exhibition, Liverpool
Bienal de SĂŁo Paulo (representing Britain)

1984
1984 ‑ an exhibition, Camden Arts Centre, London
Os Novos Primitivos, Cooperative Arvore, Oporto

1983
Third Biennale of Graphic Arts, Baden Baden
Eight in the Eighties, New York
Marathon 83, New York

1982
Three Women, Edward Totah Gallery, London
Inner Worlds, Midland Group, Nottingham
Pintura portuguesa contemporanea, Museu Luis de Camões, Macau
Hayward Annual, London
John Moores Exhibition, Liverpool

1981
Artists in Camden, Camden Arts Centre, London
Ante‑visão do Centro de Arte Moderna, Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, LisbonThe Subjective Eye, Midland Group, Nottingham

1979
Femina, UNESCO, Paris

1978
Portuguese Art since 1910, Royal Academy of Art, London
Exposição individual, Galeria III, Lisbon

1977
Artistas Portugueses en Madrid ‑ Pintura e Escultura Contemporaneas, Madrid

1976
Arte Portugués Contemporanea, Galerie Nazionale d'Arte Moderna, Rome
Art Portugais Contemporain, Musée d'Art Contemporain de la Ville de Paris
Exposiçao de Arte Moderna Portuguesa, SNBA, Lisbon

1975
XIII Bienal de SĂŁo Paulo
Figuraçao Hoje, Lisbon

1974
Expo AICA, SNBA

1973
Pintura portuguesa de hoje‑abstractos e Neo‑figurativos, Lisbon, Salamanca, Barcelona
26 Artistas de Hoje, Lisbon
Exposição de Artistas Modernas Portugueses, Galleria Quadrum, Lisbon

1970
Novos Sintomas na pintura portuguesa , Galeria Judite Dacruz, Lisbon

1969
Represented Portugal in the XI Bienal de SĂŁo Paulo, Brazil
Gravure Portugaise Contemporaine, Paris

1967
Bienal de Tokyo
Novas Iconologias, Lisbon
Art Portugais ‑ Peinture et sculpture de Naturalisme à nos jours, Brussels, Paris, Madrid

1965
Six Artists, Institute of Contemporary Arts, London

1961
Segunda Exposição de Artes Plásticas, Fundação Calouste Goulbenkian, Lisbon

1955
Young Contemporaries, London


CATALOGUES

1961
Il Exposiçao de Artes Plasticas, Fundaçao Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisbon
Paula Rego, Fundaçao Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisbon

1965
Alberto de Lacerda: 'Fragmentos de um poema intitulado Paula Rego', Paula Rego, SNBA, LisbonVictor Willing: Six Artists, Institute of Contemporary Art, London, 1965

1967
Art Portugais - Peinture et Sculpture de Naturalisme Ă  nos jours, Brussels

1971
Paula Rego Expoé, Galeria São Mameda, Lisbon

1972
Esposiçao Colectiva, Galeria Sâo Mamede, Lisbon

1974
Salette Taveres: 'A Estrutura Semântica na obra de Paula Rego', Expo AICA, SNBA

1978
Helmut Wohl: Portugese Art since 1910, Royal Academy of Art, London

1983
Victor Willing: Paula Rego: Paintings 1982 - 3 Arnolfini, Bristol; Galerie Espace, Amsterdam

1984
Deanna Petherbridge: 'Nineteen Eighty-Four in 1984' Camden Arts Centre, London

1985
Lynne Cooke: Paula Rego: Paintings 1984 - 5 Edward Totah
Gallery, London, text by Lynne Cooke
Alexander Moffat: 'Retrieving the Image', The British Art Show, Arts Council of
Great Britain

1986
Alistair Hicks: Paula Rego: Selected Work 1981 - 1986,
Aberystwyth Arts Centre
Nine Portuguese Painters, John Hansard Gallery, Southampton

1987
70 - 80 Arte Portuguesa , Brazil, SĂŁo Paulo, Rio de Janeiro,
Lewis Biggs and David Elliott, Current Affairs, Museum of Modern Art, Oxford; Feira do Circo, Forum Picoas, Lisbon
Paula Rego: Girl and Dog, Edward Totah Gallery, London,

1988
Works on paper by contemporary artists, Marlborough Fine Art, London
Victor Willing: Inevitable Prohibitions; Ruth Rosengarten, La Règle du Jeu and John McEwen In Conversation with Paula Rego, Bernardo Pinto de Almeida Paula no Pais das Maravilhas, Paula Rego, Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon and Serpentine Gallery, LondonLewis Biggs: A context for the exhibitions, Cries and Whispers, British Council

1989
Marina Warner Essay in Nursery Rhymes, Marlborough Graphics Gallery, London

1990
John McEwen, Paula Rego The Nursery Rhymes, South Bank Centre Touring Exhibition

1991
Keith Patrick, Maité Lores: From Bacon to Now ‑ The Outsider in British Figuration, Palazzo Vecchio, Florence
Germaine Greer and Colin Wiggins Essays for Tales from the National Gallery, National Gallery, London
Deanna Petherbridge: The Primacy of Drawing - An Artist's View, South Bank
Centre travelling exhibition

1993
Peter Pan & Other Stories, Marlborough Fine Art, London
Peter Pan - A Suite of 15 etchings and aquatints, Marlborough Graphics London
Judith Collins & Elspeth Linder editors: Writing on the Wall - Women Writers on
Women Artists, Tate Gallery, published by Weidenfeld & Nicholson, London

1994
Adrian Searle, Unbound - Possibilities in Painting, Hayward Gallery, London
Paula Rego: Dog Women, Marlborough Fine Art, London

1995
An American Passion - The Susan Kasen Summer and Robert D. Summer Collection of Contemporary British Paintings, catalogue edited by Patricia Saligmen

1996
Spellbound - Art and Film, Hayward Gallery, London, text by Marcia Pointon
Paula Rego: The Dancing Ostriches from Disney's Fantasia, Marlborough Fine Art, London and Saatchi Collection, London. Introduction by Sarah Kent, essay
by John McEwen
Marcia Pointon, Familiarity, Fear and the Boundaries of the Body in Paula Rego's Dialogue with Disney, Paula Rego - New Work, Marlborough Gallery Inc., New York

1994-1995
An American Passion - The Susan Kasen Summer and Robert D. Summer Collection of Contemporary British Paintings, catalogue edited by Patricia Saligmen

1996
Spellbound - Art and Film, Hayward Gallery, London, text by Marcia Pointon
Paula Rego: The Dancing Ostriches from Disney's Fantasia, Marlborough Fine Art, London and Saatchi Collection, London. Introduction by Sarah Kent, essay
by John McEwen
Marcia Pointon, Familiarity, Fear and the Boundaries of the Body in Paula Rego's Dialogue with Disney, Paula Rego - New Work, Marlborough Gallery Inc., New York

1997
Nicholas Serota & Lewis Biggs, Preface; Fiona Bradley, Introduction: Automatic Narrative; Victor Willing, The Imagiconography of Paula Rego; Ruth Rosengarten, Home Truths: The Work of Paula Rego; Judith Collins, Paula Rego's Drawing. The Tate Gallery, Liverpool, Retrospective Exhibition:
Travelling to: Fundação das Descobertas, Centro Cultural de Belém, Lisbon

1998
Desmond Shawe-Taylor, Paula Rego, Dulwich Picture Gallery
1998-99
Dina Vierny, Bertrand Lorquin, Michael Peppiatt, Jill Lloyd: The School of London - From Bacon to Bevan, Musée Maillol, Paris; Auditorio de Galicia, Santiago de Compostela

1999
Peter Weiermair, Andreas Hapkemeyer, Figuration, Blickle Stiftung Bruchsal; Rupertinum Salzburg; Bolzano Museum
Roger Bevan Introduction, Portrait of a City - Seven Figurative Painters from London, John Berggruen Gallery, San Francisco

2000
Timothy Hyman, Roger Malbert, Carnivalesque, Hayward Gallery Travelling Exhibition: Brighton Museum; Nottingham Castle Museum
Richard Morphet, Robert Rosenblum, Judith Bumpus, Keith Hartley,
Andrew Lambirth, Marco Livingstone, Christopher Riopelle: Encounters: New Art from Old, National Gallery, London

2001
Pippa Coles, Mathew Higgs, Jacqui Poncelet, British Art Show 5, Hayward Gallery, South Bank Centre Travelling exhibition: Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh; Southampton City Art Gallery; National Museum of Wales, Cardiff; Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery
Patrick McCaughey , Richard Cork, Emily M. Weeks, The School of London and their Friends – The Collection of Elaine and Melvin Merians, Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase, USA.

2001-2002
Paula Rego, Celestina’s House, Abbott Hall Art Gallery, Kendal & Yale Center for British Art. Fiona Bradley, Paula Rego – Recent Works; Edward King interview with Paula Rego

2002
Marina Warner, Metamorphing, The Science Museum, London.
Paula Rego- Jane Eyre, Yale Center for British Art, New Haven

2004
Paula Rego, Serralves Museum, Oporto, 15 October 2004-23 January 2005.
JoĂŁo Fernandes, Introduction and The Stories by Paula Rego, between Painting and Drawing: Ruth Rosengarten: Possessed: Love and Authority in the work of Paula Rego; Marco Livingstone: All that is left behind. Serralves Museum, Oporto. Published in English and Portuguese
Christina Bagatavicius, Paula Rego in Focus, Tate Britain, October 2004-January 2005

BOOKS

1974
José Augusto França: Pintura portuguesa no século XX, Livraria Bertrand, Lisbon, 1974, 1986

1984

Rui Mário Gonçalves: Pintura e escultura em Portugal, 1940 - 1980, Lisbon, Instituto
de Cultura, Lisbon

1986
Alexandre Melo e Joao Pinharanda: Arte Contemporânea Portuguesa, Lisbon
Bernardo Pinto de Almeida: Breve introdução à pintura portuguesa no século XX, Edição do Autor, Oporto

1989
Nursery Rhymes, Thames and Hudson

1991
Hector Obalk: Paula Rego, Art Random, Kyoto Shoin International Co. Ltd., Kyoto,
Japan


1992
John McEwen: Paula Rego, Phaidon Press Ltd., London

1993
The Art Book, Phaidon Press Ltd, London
Peter Pan, Folio Society

1994
Marina Warner, Wonder Tales, Chatto & Windus, London
A Portfolio - Nine London Birds, published by the Byam Shaw School of Art, London,
introduction by John McEwen

1995
Diana Eccles, Barbara Putt, editors, British Council Collection Catalogue Volume II

1996
John McEwen, Paula Rego, Phaidon Press, London, updated edition in paperback
Blake Morrison, Pendle Witches, Enitharmon Press, London
John McEwen, Dancing Ostriches, Saatchi Publications

1997
Paula Rego, Tate Gallery Publications

1998
Colin Wiggins, Paula Rego, Dictionary of Women Artists, Volume I, pp 1155 - 1159, edited by Delia Gaze, Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers, London
Frances Borzello, Seeing Ourselves - Women's self-portraits, Thames & Hudson, London,
pp 26, 177, 214
Alexandre Melo, Artes PlĂ sticas em Portugal, Dos Anos 70 aos nossos Dias, Difel, Portugal, pp 28-31 & pp 104 - 107
Elizabeth Cayzer, Changing Perceptions - Milestones in Twentieth-Century British Portraiture, The Alpha Press, Brighton, pp. 87 - 91
Marco Livingstone, Paula Rego - Grooming, in Art: The Critics' Choice, Aurum Press, London
Elizabeth Drury, Self Portraits of the World’s Greatest Painters, Parkgate Books, 1999,
Page 306

1999
Ruth Rosengarten, Getting Away with Murder – Paula Rego and the crime of Father Amaro, Delos Press, Birmingham
Ruth Rosengarten, Paula Rego e O Crime do Padre Amaro, Quetzal Editores, Lisbon

2000
Andrew Graham-Dixon, The Art of Success, Portraits by Snowdon, Vogue, May
Chris Dunn, People Looking at Art, Hodder & Stoughton, London
Fiona Bradley, editor, Victor Willing, August Publishers

2002
Fiona Bradley, Paula Rego, Tate Publishing

2003
Neil MacGregor, The Daily Telegraph Britain’s Paintings, Cassell Illustrated, 2003, Page 57
Dr. Maria Manuel Lisboa, Paula Rego’s Map of Memory: National and Sexual Politics, Ashgate Publishing Ltd., Hampshire
Stephen Stuart-Smith with introduction by Marina Warner, Paula Rego – Jane Eyre, Enitharmon Editions, London
T.G. Rosenthal, Paula Rego: The Complete Graphic Work, Thames & Hudson, London

2004
Robert Hughes, That’s showbusiness – The New Shock of the New, The Guardian, 30 June
Ruth Rosengarten, Compreender Paula Rego – 25 Perspectivas, Publico Serralves


MISC. TELEVISION, RADIO, ETC.

1988
Marina Warner interview with the artist, BBC Radio 3,
Jake Auerbach, The Artist's Eye, BBC2,

1992

Margaret Walters Interview for 'Meridian', BBC World Service February
John McEwen: lecture at the National Gallery, London, 11 February
Melvyn Bragg film on the artist, The South Bank Show, London Weekend Television, 23 February

1994
Sue Aaron, The Art: The Art of Living Things, BBC Schools Programme, 8 February &
20 October
Reiner Moritz, Masterworks, German TV, Munich and RTP Portugal
Elizabeth Levy, Little Angels, Little Devils, Wall to Wall Television Ltd. for Channel 4,
10 May
Sue Aron, Art Show: The Art Show, BBC Schools Programme, Summer and November
Steve Grant, 'The Late Show', BBC2, 17 November

1996
Tim Marlow, Kaleidescope, BBC Radio 4, 23 February

1997
Glyn Hughes Interview, 'Symposiart' Series, September
Sue Lawley, Desert Island Discs, BBC Radio 4, 7 December

1998
Paula Rego in conversation with Jane Haynes, Metamorphosis in the Creative Process,
Harvest Symposium, Courtauld Institute of Art, London, 24 October

2000
Tim Marlow in conversation with Paula Rego, Through the Artist’s Eyes,
The Tate Gallery, 9 June
Randall Wright, Director, BBC1 Omnibus, Shock of the Old, 11 June
Jenni Murray, BBC Radio 4, Woman’s Hour, 16 June

2001
John Tusa Interview, BBC Radio 3, 2 June
ITN Factual for Artsworld , Interview by Fiona Bradley, Produced by Dick Bower,
The Passion of Paula Rego, 15 July

2002
Cathy Courtney, National Life Story Collection, National Sound Archive, British Library

2003
Joan Bakewell, BBC4, Paula Rego,28 January
Francine Stock, Front Row Interview with Paula Rego, BBC Radio 4, 8 October
Paul Allen, Night Waves Interview with Paula Rego, BBC Radio 4, 17 October
Jenni Murray, Woman's Hour, Paula Rego interview, Radio 4, 22 October.
Paula Rego in conversation with Dr. Maria Lisboa, Heffers, Cambridge, 30 October

2004
Robert Hughes, The New Shock of the New, BBC2, 3 July
Jenni Murray, Woman’s Hour, Paula Rego interview, Radio 4, 21 October
Nightwaves, BBC Radio 3, 23 November
BBC The Culture Show, December

1998
Colin Wiggins, Paula Rego, Dictionary of Women Artists, Volume I, pp 1155 - 1159, edited by Delia Gaze, Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers, London
Frances Borzello, Seeing Ourselves - Women's self-portraits, Thames & Hudson, London,
pp 26, 177, 214
Alexandre Melo, Artes PlĂ sticas em Portugal, Dos Anos 70 aos nossos Dias, Difel, Portugal, pp 28-31 & pp 104 - 107
Elizabeth Cayzer, Changing Perceptions - Milestones in Twentieth-Century British Portraiture, The Alpha Press, Brighton, pp. 87 - 91
Marco Livingstone, Paula Rego - Grooming, in Art: The Critics' Choice, Aurum Press, London
Elizabeth Drury, Self Portraits of the World’s Greatest Painters, Parkgate Books, 1999,
Page 306

1999
Ruth Rosengarten, Getting Away with Murder – Paula Rego and the crime of Father Amaro, Delos Press, Birmingham
Ruth Rosengarten, Paula Rego e O Crime do Padre Amaro, Quetzal Editores, Lisbon

2000
Andrew Graham-Dixon, The Art of Success, Portraits by Snowdon, Vogue, May
Chris Dunn, People Looking at Art, Hodder & Stoughton, London
Fiona Bradley, editor, Victor Willing, August Publishers

2002
Fiona Bradley, Paula Rego, Tate Publishing

2003
Neil MacGregor, The Daily Telegraph Britain’s Paintings, Cassell Illustrated, 2003, Page 57
Dr. Maria Manuel Lisboa, Paula Rego’s Map of Memory: National and Sexual Politics, Ashgate Publishing Ltd., Hampshire
Stephen Stuart-Smith with introduction by Marina Warner, Paula Rego – Jane Eyre, Enitharmon Editions, London
T.G. Rosenthal, Paula Rego: The Complete Graphic Work, Thames & Hudson, London

2004
Robert Hughes, That’s showbusiness – The New Shock of the New, The Guardian, 30 June
Ruth Rosengarten, Compreender Paula Rego – 25 Perspectivas, Publico Serralves

2005
Royal Mail commission of a set of Stamps, 24th February


PUBLIC COLLECTIONS

Abbot Hall Art Gallery, Kendal
Arts Council, London
Berardo Collection, Sintra Museum of Modern Art, Portugal
British Council, London
British Government Collection, on loan to the British Embassy, Lisbon
British Museum, London
Bristol City Art Gallery
Chapel of the Palacio de Belém, Lisbon
Frissiras Museum, Athens
Leeds City Art Gallery, Leeds
Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
National Gallery, London
National Portrait Gallery, London
New Hall, Cambridge
Portuguese Embassy, London
Rugby Museum and Art Gallery
Saatchi Gallery, London
Tate Gallery, London
Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester
Yale Center for British Art