Selected works by Peles Empire

Peles Empire
Formation 1

2013

Digital print on paper

275 x 440 cm

Peles Empire is a collaborative artistic project consisting of two artists, Katharina Stöver and Barbara Wolff, whose work takes its consistent source (and name) from a single site: a lavish nineteenth century castle in Romania.
For Formation, the artists used the Grand Armoury in Peles Castle as their original source; the shining metallic surfaces of the armour, as well as the room’s distinctive chessboard floor, can be discerned, but only just. The image itself is never fully disclosed: as though seen through the flickering glitches of a corrupted image file, the armoury appears only in glimpses, its spatial depth reduced to an abstracted flatness. By inverting the armoury’s threedimensional space – best represented in its patterned floor, like the recessive pattern of a Renaissance painting – the images return the live experience of an historical space to the mediated one of contemporary visual overload.

Peles Empire
Formation 7

2013

Digital print on paper

275 x 440 cm

This, then, is the past seen in terms of the present. The images – Formation 1 and 7 – are digital prints, blown up to an almost architectural scale; by doing so, that tension between spatial occupations – actual and imagined – is charged with energy. Our struggling to make the image cohere parallels what we do with our idea of the past: we strain to make it click. Confronted with images that taunt us with potential completion, our experience is both distant and close, removed and teasingly intimate.

Text by Ben Street


Articles

FRIEZE PROJECTS – PELES EMPIRE
by Rob Alderson, Monday 10 October 2011, It’s Nice That

The Frieze Art Fair kicks off on Thursday and amid the hits, the misses and the tense discussion about The State of The Art World ( the capitals are mandatory) there’s some 24-carat work to be sniffed out. The specially-commissioned Frieze Projects gives eight emerging talents free rein to explore their own interests and passions against the backdrop of the world famous event. Curator Sarah McCrory has picked a fine selection of artists to work with, and we will be catching up with three of them this week, starting with the enigmatic Peles Empire.
Formed by Katharina Stoever and Barbara Wolff in 2005, Peles Empire takes its name from a castle at the foot of the Carpathian mountains, which boasts an eclectic collision of art deco, rococo, renaissance and gothic architecture and decoration. Peles Empire reproduce rooms from this spectacular setting and merge their re-creations with the characters of the rooms they take over.
There are permanent spaces in London and Cluj, and the girls have taken their inspiration to shows around the world. This week, it lands at Frieze…
Hi there! Tell us in your own words what you’ve got planned for the Frieze Projects…
We are installing a working bar that will serve Tuica, a romanian spirit, and a Romanian sparkling water called Borsec. The backdrop of the bar is based on the same image of the castle Peles we currently have installed at our London and Cluj exhibition spaces, but is a more abstract version of it. There will also be objects that are mirroring or translating elements of the image.

Source: itsnicethat.com


FRIEZE PROJECTS 2011- PELES EMPIRE
2011, Frieze

Peles Empire is a collaboration by Katharina Stoever and Barbara Wolff, founded in 2005. Their work took as its source material Peles, a Romanian castle sited at the foot of the Carpathian Mountains. Built between 1873 and 1913, the castle’s architecture is a clash of historical styles ranging from Renaissance to Gothic Revival, Art Deco to Rococo. Peles Empire has previously functioned as an exhibition space, salon and bar, as well as a collaborative force. Stoever and Wolff have reproduced nine different rooms of the castle, recreating them with simple photocopied montages. Themes of reproduction, reconstruction and transformation, as evident in the history of Peles have formed the thread of Stoever and Wolff’s production. At Frieze Art Fair, Peles Empire installed a bar that acts as a Gesamtkunstwerk in which everything – from the reproduced room and its decorative furnishings, to the serving of guests and taking part in the fair – was part of the work.

Source: friezefoundation.org