Selected works by Rachel Harrison

Rachel Harrison
Nose (and detail)

2005

Wood, polystyrene, cement, acrylic, rubber, cardboard

193 x 76.2 x 45.7 cm
Rachel Harrison’s work draws from a wide range of influence, wittily combining art historical and pop cultural references through a diverse play of materials. In Nose, Harrison’s figure towers on a cardboard box plinth as an abject gargoyle, adorned with a plastic joke shop nose. Grotesque and funny, Harrison’s humour derives from its carefully structured, yet open-ended suggestion, each element building up to a plausible punch line. Using visual language as a subversive tool, Harrison parodies expected comparison to artists such as Franz West and Paul McCarthy,
appropriating styles and motifs with subtle knowingness, wielding artistic process as a mode of investigation.
Rachel Harrison
Glamour Wig

2005

Wood, polystyrene, acrylic, ladder, synthetic wig, digital photograph

170.2 x 71.1 x 40.6 cm
Like many of her creations, Rachel Harrison’s Glamour Wig plays sculptural dress-up by combining abstract forms and color with manufactured readymade products. Pairing the silver glitz of a rock-star wig with the aluminum of a utility ladder, its long, bare legs leading up to a gaping mouth, Harrison’s figure suggests the comical decadence and sexual innuendos of a Glam Rock queen. Glamour Wig, a sculptural “space oddity,” lends itself well to the intentional artificiality, synthesized sound, and androgyny for which this genre became notorious.

Articles

Rachel Harrison at Greene Naftali by Mia Fineman


If most gallery shows are essentially one-liners, rewarding a few minutes of attention with a quick chuckle and a feeling of having "gotten it," Rachel Harrison's recent show at Greene Naftali was more like that long absurdist riddle about an elephant in a bathtub ending with the incomprehensible punch line, "No soap, radio."
Like the work of Jessica Stockholder and Jason Rhoades, Harrison's objects and installations fuse a mildly anarchic, neo-Dadaist sensibility with a free-wheeling, Home-Depot-inspired formalism. For the past few years, her work has been a prominent fixture in the many group shows curated by Kenny Schachter in and around New York; she made her solo debut last spring with an elaborate installation in the prewar parlor of the Arena Gallery in Brooklyn's Cobble Hill.
For her latest solo show, Harrison created a off-kilter world of creamy decorator pastels, a world in which a banal snapshot is mysteriously embedded in a boulder-like blob of cornflower-blue papier-mâché, a shelf is lined with a row of dusty cans of olives and celebrity photos, and petal-pink Styrofoam sheets are etched with melodramatic soap-opera phrases.

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Source: www.artnet.com


Rachel Harrison: The Look of Dress-Separates by Devon Dikeou


After meandering through the fluorescently lit halls of 526 West 26th Street to finally emerge at Greene Naftali for the one person exhibition of Rachel Harrison, one encounters a peach wall blocking the entrance of the gallery with a magnetic sign board, seemingly having been lifted from an abandoned hospital. Through inspection (and/or the checklist), the viewer ascertains that the piece is entitled fegs (federal employment guidance service), and the tone is set for the inquisitive, wry treatment that Rachel Harrison achieves in her work. While most artists seemingly come up short when attempting to cross the barriers between photography, installation, picture making, and object making, Harrison not only gets it, but manages to make the embrace meaningful and memorable.
Scooting behind the employment menu from some antiquated government bureau, the single clean studded and painted wall gives way to the roughed-out construction revealing an L-shape set of walls (rather than a free standing uniwall), using materials normally associated with the artist's previous installations. This construction is adorned with a gigantic orange headless woman/goddess carved out of Styrofoam.

Read the entire article here
Source: www.zingmagazine.com