Selected works by Rebecca Warren

Rebecca Warren
SHE

2003

6-part installation

Dimensions variable
Ranging from the amorphous to more clearly recognisable forms, Rebecca Warren’s sculptures create a bold new figure for the female nude. Her subject is one of the most traditional in art history, but she subverts the inherited cliches associated with the genre, redefining what sculpture should be or should look like. With their earthy, unfired and unfinished look, they unveil a tension between thought and process, while creating a unique, new sculptural mode.
Rebecca Warren
Bohemian Rhapsody III

2000

bronze and plinth

44 x 30 x 40cm
Rebecca Warren
Croccioni

2000

unfired clay and plinth

85 x 35 x 84cm
Rebecca Warren
Honkey-Tonk Chateau

2000

unfired clay and plinth

55 x 44 x 54cm
Rebecca Warren
Jesus, This Is Iggy

2000

painted unfired clay and plinth

55 x 55 x 70cm
Rebecca Warren
The Mechanic

2000

unfired clay and plinth

48 x 36 x 48cm
Rebecca Warren
Totem and Taboo

2001

painted unfired clay and plinth

28 x 30 x 32cm
Rebecca Warren
SHE - Valerie

2003



186 x 76 x 91 cm
Warren, who belongs to the same generation as the YBA artists from the 1990s, has developed an aesthetic entirely her own. Clay, a very flexible medium, allows her to explore unconscious free association. “The beauty of working with a material like clay is that it gives you that freedom to change things... I like to keep the quality that they’re breeding quite quickly and they’re made quite quickly, that there’s a sense of them perhaps not being complete, to keep them alive and dynamic and fresh”.
Rebecca Warren
SHE - Untitled

2003

unfired clay, MDF & wheels

198 x 46 x 77 cm
In her work, Warren wryly addresses her fascination with artists who have overtly fetishised the female form: photographer Helmut Newton, cartoonist Robert Crumb, and abstract expressionist Willem de Kooning. Her earth mothers quote from their imagery, and from that of and modernist sculpture, highlighting a shared interest in sexualising women’s shape by discarding heads or any personal attributes, and filtering symbols of objectification – aggressively cartoonised buttocks, nipples and postures.
Rebecca Warren
SHE - South Kent

2003

unfired clay, MDF & wheels

206 x 127 x 66 cm
Rebecca Warren
SHE - No.6

2003

unfired clay, MDF & wheels

186 x 61 x 122 cm
Rebecca Warren
SHE - Homage to R. Crumb, my Father

2003

Unfired clay, MDF & wheels

213 x 81.5 x 81.5 cm
Rebecca Warren
SHE - And Who Would Be My Mother

2003

Unfired clay, MDF & wheels

168 x 76 x 76 cm
Rebecca Warren
10-4

2000

Painted unfired clay and plinth

28 x 28 x 40 cm
Rebecca Warren
Croccioni

2000

Reinforced clay on 2 painted MDF plinths

85 x 35 x 84 cm
Rebecca Warren
The Lady With The Little Dog

2003

Unfired clay, MDF, turntable and wheels

178 x 100 x 88 cm

Other Resources

artfacts.net - Rebecca Warren
Additional information on Rebecca Warren

the-artists.org
More information on Rebecca Warren

guardian.co.uk - Two sculptures by Rebecca Warren
A sculptor who trained in photography, Rebecca Warren has an offbeat sense of humour, as is reflected in her huge, porridgey women in raw clay.

MatthewMarks.com
- Matthew Marks presents Rebecca Warren
A large selection of images combined with a biography, exhibitions and press packet.

frieze.com
- 'Under the Influence' Jennifer Higgie on Rebecca Warren
A few years ago I lived near a grim pub called The Skinner's Arms. It was usually empty, and its faded red upholstery was thin and damp. Every time I passed by, it reminded me of the appalling moment in my childhood when I first heard the expression 'there's more than one way to skin a cat'; in a flash the words untangled into a vivid blood-stained scenario of howling cats and bloody forearms - words and images strung together like splintered bones.