Selected works by Richard Höglund

Richard Höglund
Sea Picture XX

2015

Silver, lead, poppy oil, marble dust, diatomaceous earth, bone pulver, and acrylic emulsions on linen

226 x 183 cm
Richard Höglund
Sea Picture IX

2013

Silver, tin, zinc, lead, oil, marble, bone, linen, wood, iron, and acrylic emulsions on linen

226 x 183 cm
Richard Höglund
Sea Picture XXIV

2015

Silver, lead, poppy oil, marble dust, diatomaceous earth, bone pulver, and acrylic emulsions on linen

226 x 183 cm

Articles

RICHARD HÖGLUND: HYSTERICAL. SUBLIME.


“To begin with, it underscores the impossibility of representing the sublime.”

Just as how Medusa could only be seen — and thus, slain — with the help of a mirror, Richard Höglund attempts in Beautiful. Sublime. to document the residual traces of the sublime, an aesthetic construct that almost everyone agrees cannot be represented. He has tracked the development of the Sublime from the external — moonlit vistas, frozen seas, the Lake District — to the internal void. Accessing this mental void is the new question. Höglund purports that it can be done through the meditative labor of automatic drawing.
The most successful series in the show features photographs taken by Höglund of sublime landscapes: an Icelandic marsh, the Utah desert, craggy Swiss mountaintops. They are nice photographs, and the scenes that they document are stunning in their own right, but… they’re no sublime. John Berger said that pictures of nature are like fashion photographs in that they “record and admit pleasure.” And occurring to Edmund Burke, the first modern thinker to deal with the concept of sublime, something must be beautiful and terrifying to classify. Knowing that these images aren’t enough, Höglund pairs them with graphite revisions of the scenes. These drawings are simultaneously landscapes of the external world and the mind of the artist who is witnessing it.
It is interesting how drawing, or rather, lineality, takes precedent when the artist sets down the path of mental recreation. Perhaps because the line almost always borders or script, which tempts the linguistic faculties of the mind, or perhaps because drawings can be seen as maps, and thus help to negotiate the place of the subject in the world. Whatever the reason, Höglund places a lot of emphasis on graphite.

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