Selected works by Simon Bedwell

Simon Bedwell
Untitled (Life After Liberalism)

2004



55 x 84 cm

Some of the posters have had their transient commercial directives so intertwined with the artist’s fictional and material alterations that it is impossible to tell where the original ends and the mutation begins.

Simon Bedwell
Untitled (Brains)

2003

Spray paint on found poster

79.2 x 59.5 cm

Whilst destroying the quick-hit, constantly shifting message of this ephemeral material, Simon Bedwell also saves it, giving it new weight and an object-quality that meanwhile retains an echo of the familiar.

Simon Bedwell
Untitled (Croatia)

2004

Spray paint on poster

89 x 63 cm

Using ClipArt and WordArt software, available to almost anybody with a computer, Simon Bedwell’s posters combine found pictures with words and phrases, real and invented.

Simon Bedwell
Untitled (Forgetkult)

2003

Spray paint on found poster

43 x 62.3 cm
Simon Bedwell
Untitled (Come to London)

2004

Spray paint on found poster on aluminium

64.3 x 49.3 cm
Simon Bedwell
Untitled (Eliteratti)

2004

Spray paint, acrylic and collage on paper

121.5 x 152 cm
Simon Bedwell
Untitled (Exhibition)

2004

Spray paint on found poster

43.7 x 55.5 cm
Simon Bedwell
Untitled (Festival)

2004

Spray paint on found poster

96 x 135 cm
Simon Bedwell
Untitled (Freud Museum)

2004

Spray paint on found poster

127 x 99.7 cm
Simon Bedwell
Untitled (Marli Renfro Centre)

2003

Spray paint on found poster

139.5 x 100 cm
Simon Bedwell
Untitled (Struggl)

2003

Spray paint and acrylic on paper

121.5 x 152.3 cm
Simon Bedwell
Untitled (Tate Jamaica)

2003

Spray paint on found poster

89 x 63 cm
Simon Bedwell
Untitled (The Rich..)

2004

Spray paint on found poster on aluminium

52 x 74.5 cm
Simon Bedwell
Untitled (Your Worst Fear)

2004

Spray paint on found poster

75 x 55.5 cm
Simon Bedwell
Liffosucter

2004

Oil, acrylic and spraypaint on canvas

158 x 213 cm

As in much of Simon Bedwell’s work, a wide range of visual material, from promotional blurbs to local newspaper headlines, from ’50s photography to Communist Bloc advertising, combines to shape the final images.

Simon Bedwell
Proposed Suburban Monument

2004

Oil and acrylic on canvas

207 x 165 cm

Simon Bedwell is best known for his hand-manipulated trashed posters and photographs, using text and spray-paint to generate esoteric, strangely poignant or crass comedic fusions of word and image.

Simon Bedwell
Capitulater

2004

Acrylic on canvas

158.5 x 213.5 cm

Simon Bedwell draws on the visual vernacular of the streets, employing the cheap and throwaway nostalgia of posters scavenged from billboards, bargain bins and thrift stores as raw materials to fragment, divert and elaborate the original meaning into absurd compositions, poetic narratives and sardonic allegories of power.


Other Resources

the-artists.org
Modern and contemporary artists and art; Simon Bedwell

tfl.gov.uk
Simon Bedwell: Advertising Never Tells Anyone Anything Anyway
Simon Bedwell, one of ten artists shortlisted for Beck's Futures 2004, has created four sets of posters specifically for Piccadilly Circus Station.
Using ClipArt and WordArt software, available to almost anybody with a computer, Bedwell's posters combine found pictures with words and phrases, real and invented.
As in much of his work, a wide range of visual material, from promotional blurbs to local newspaper headlines, from '50s photography to Communist Bloc advertising, combines to shape the final images.

dennishollingsworth.us
Dennis Hollingsworth on Simon Bedwell
Simon Bedwell is best known for his hand-manipulated trashed posters and photographs, using text and spray-paint to generate esoteric, strangely poignant or crass comedic fusions of word and image. The work draws on the visual vernacular of the streets, employing the cheap and throwaway nostalgia of posters scavenged from billboards, bargain bins and thrift stores as raw materials to fragment, divert and elaborate the original meaning into absurd compositions, poetic narratives and sardonic allegories of power.

findarticles.com
BANK at Gallerie Poo-Poo by Mark Harris
Simon Bedwell, John Russell, Milly Thompson and Andrew Williamson constitute BANK, the unconventional London collaborative that organizes shows in its own warehouse space, incorporating other artists' contributions into manic Gesamtkunstwerke that have included zombie mannequins, endurance performances, fake waterfalls and Mahler symphonies. With memorable titles like "Cocaine Orgasm," these shows subsume their components into jarring installations where the interactivity of art works is just the point. Far from putting off participants, this forced surrender of autonomy has attracted many prominent artists interested in subjecting their work to radical, and often irreverent, recontextualization.

btinternet.com
An appraisal of BANK By John Rogers. Simon Bedwell – a founder member of BANK
I first heard about BANK when Dave Burrows mentioned it during a talk about his work. I didn't know what he meant when he started talking about Bank, but I got the feeling that he expected me to. He was talking about one of his early post graduate exhibitions, a show that sounded quite interesting to me a cool, London, flippant, pop kind of way. It was 'Cocaine Orgasm' (1991) and Dave's piece consisted of little drawings of pop stars and philosophers fighting - Jarvis Cocker having as punch up with Wittgenstein, Liam Gallagher giving Adorno a wedgie, all standing in the giant pile of 'cocaine' that formed the centrepiece of the show.