Valery Koshlyakov

Selected works by Valery Koshlyakov

Valery Koshlyakov
Paris, Notre Dame

2008

Acrylic on canvas

200 x 400 cm

Valery Koshlyakov’s large-scale cardboard paintings, collages and installations – sometimes hanging from the ceiling, sometimes made out of sticky tape placed
directly onto the gallery walls – irreverently engage with ideas of empire.

Covered in paint drips, his flattened-box panels are blown-up postcard images of state-approved classical and monumental European architecture that have more in common with street art than with photorealistic obedience. They look wet, urgent, quickly rendered, and they show his iconic subjects, from a Soviet stadium to a gothic cathedral, as a madman’s fantasy.

Valery Koshlyakov
Moscow, Luzhniki Stadium

2008

Acrylic on canvas

200 x 450 cm

The five-metre wide Grand Opera, Paris, one of his earlier cardboard works, depicts its subject in a myriad of dizzy unfinished details, washes and vigorous brushstrokes that turn the solid structure into a half-idealized, half-non-existing precarious castle in the air. We see the building from below, in traditional composition, but the uneven surface on which it is painted makes it fragmented, unhinged, as if it were breaking away from its support.

Valery Koshlyakov
High-rise on Raushskaya Embankment

2006

Tempera on cardboard

285 x 280 cm
The work’s grand subject and pompous gestural painting accentuates the kitsch factor – this could be a slightly psychotic version of the common hack-painted tourist souvenir. Similarly with High-rise on Raushskaya Embankment, painted with tempera on cardboard, which is evocative of an avant-garde architectural masterpiece, yet the painting’s visibly flimsy support, in contrast with the monumentality of its subject, also somehow chimes in with the irony of a failed utopia.
Valery Koshlyakov
Grand Opera, Paris

1995

Tempera on cardboard

345 x 487 cm

Koshlyakov’s re-reading of symbols of empire is all-encompassing, taking imagery from ancient ruins and sculpture to modern government buildings, but the monumental scale of his works also suggests an additional, particularly charged reference – that of Stalin-era murals and political myth-building.

Text by Lupe Nùñez-Fernández


Articles

VALERY KOSHLYAKOV
2009, by Yulia Tikhonova, Flash Art Online

Russian conceptual artist Valery Koshlyakov is an artisan of monuments to the golden age. In his exhibition “Unreachable,” the artist presents a scene of instability displaying five contorted metal giants that lean as if under the winds of the revolutionary storms that fed Russian art from the 1920s onwards. Drawing on the avant-garde monuments of Tatlin and Melnikov, these bent sculptures thrust some ten feet up into the gallery space and evince the rise and fall of utopias. The artist used thin steel wire to weld anthropoids, skeletal forms that free-stand on wide open feet, with bodies and heads culminating in either points or cylindrical forms.

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Source: flashartonline.com


VALERY KOSHLYAKOV
March 2010, In Moscow

One of the most succeful Russian artists Valery Koshlyakov was born in 1962 in Salsk (Rostov region). He studied in Rostov M. Grekov art college. Then he has begun to interest in realistic painting. After graduating from the college Koshlyakov began to work as decorator in the local theater of musical comedy and had an acquantance to artist Avdey Ter-Oganyan. He introduced him to the works of the Western avant-garde. In 1988th Koshlyakov became a member of the artistic association "Art or Death". Avdey Ter-Oganyan was its leader and the assocoation also included artists Alexey Sigutin, Yuri Shabelnikov, Nikolay Konstantinov, Vasily Slepchenko, poet Miroslav Nemiroff, musician Sergei Timofeyev, etc.

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Source: see-you-in-moscow.com


VALERY KOSHLYAKOV AT DAVIS MUSEUM AND CULTURAL CENTER
2004, Art Daily

WELLESLEY, MA.- The Davis Museum and Cultural Center presents Valery Koshlyakov through December 31, 2004. This is the first United States museum exhibition of the Russian painter and installation artist Valery Koshlyakov who was selected to represent Russia at the 2003 Venice Biennial. Based in Moscow and Berlin he will be the Davis Museum and Cultural Center’s second artist in residence this year. He also will realize works on site for the museum’s lobby starting September 27th, with an exhibition to be inaugurated in October 2004.

Koshlyakov is primarily known for painting on large scale cardboard that is suspended from the ceiling. He also “draws” with tape directly on the gallery walls. He depicts monuments (such as the Kremlin) and places within Europe, transforming them into symbols of cultural heritage and politics. His use of cardboard can be read in the context of European artists in the 1960s (such as Daniel Spoerri; Villeglé; Raymond Hains) who sought to work with found objects and to redefine painting. Koshlyakov also engages a Russian tradition of using such materials.

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Source: artdaily.com