Sun Yuan & Peng Yu

Selected works by Sun Yuan & Peng Yu

Sun Yuan & Peng Yu
Old Persons Home

2007

13 x life size sculptures and 13 x dynamoelectric wheel chairs

Dimensions variable
Sun Yuan and Peng Yu are two of China’s most controversial artists, renown for working with extreme materials such as human fat tissue, live animals, and baby cadavers to deal with issues of perception, death, and the human condition. In Old Person’s Home Sun & Peng present a shocking scene of an even more grotesque kind. Hilariously wicked, their satirical models of decrepit OAPS look suspiciously familiar to world leaders, long crippled and impotent, left to battle it out in true geriatric style. Placed in electric wheelchairs, the withered, toothless, senile, and drooling, are set on a collision course for harmless ‘skirmish’ as they roll about the gallery at snail’s pace, crashing into each other at random in a grizzly parody of the U.N.dead.
Sun Yuan & Peng Yu
Old Persons Home

2007

13 x life size sculptures and 13 x dynamoelectric wheel chairs

Dimensions variable
Sun Yuan & Peng Yu
Angel (and 4 details)

2008

Life size sculpture in fibre-reinforced polymer and silica gel


Articles

Visual Art: East meets West in new cultural revolutionm


Presenting some Henry Moore bronzes as prizes at the Royal Zoological Society in the early 1960s, the Duke of Edinburgh remarked with customary tact and vision that a tough, expressionistically modelled little piece called Animal Head looked like "a monkey's gallstone". Forty years on, a version of the same work sits in Beijing's China Art Gallery. It seems that Henry Moore has become a more potent symbol and representative of Britain over the past four decades than the Royal Family - and certainly a more diplomatic one.

The current exhibition in China is the culmination of decades of rigorous promotion of Moore, both by the artist's own foundation and by the British Council which has long recognised the sculptor's universal appeal. This notwithstanding, the China project feels like the final frontier breached for the Yorkshire-born artist, not least because his work has also been sited in Beihai Park, an elegant imperial playground second only to the Forbidden City as the centre of ancient Chinese culture.

The enthusiasm for the project is genuine. Pictures of the show made the front pages of the Chinese press, and the cultural establishment has made noises that it wants more British art. Zhu Zhu, Deputy Director of the Central Academy, is desperate to have a Moore sited in Beijing. "There have been a number of shows of western art here in the last 10 years - Rodin, Dali, even your Gilbert and George," she says, "but nothing on this scale and nothing that is permanent."

Read the entire article here
Source: independent.co.uk



Visual Art: East meets West in new cultural revolution


The Left Bank Gallery in the Zhongguancun area of Beijing's Haidian District unveiled "The Left-Wing" in late December 2003. The gallery housed the exhibit on two huge concrete floors within a commercial real estate project called Left Bank.

Besides founding the Left Wing, Lin Jian is also behind the development of Left Bank. His famous slogan, "When the world turns to the right, we turn left," has made him and his real estate project well known in Beijing's booming and highly competitive real estate business circle. In the past three years, the real estate business in Beijing has become one of the largest in China. What is phenomenal is that many real estate developers are interested in supporting avant-garde art projects, such as performance art, video, installation and modern dance. The idea behind this is to use art events as indirect advertisements for projects and to brand them as culturally savvy. As developer Pan Shiyi once noted, to build and sell is actually to promote culture and taste.

For the successful and well-educated younger generation, viewing contemporary art means appreciating advanced aesthetics and a greater sense of cultivation. Because of this, mass media have devoted growing coverage to art events, and some developers not only sponsor contemporary art exhibitions but also run exhibition spaces, such as East Art Center, X-ray Art Center, and Today's Gallery.

Read the entire article here
Source: chinatoday.com