Selected works by Yue Minjun

Yue Minjun
Untitled

2005

Oil on canvas

220.3 x 200 cm
Immediately humorous and sympathetic, Yue Minjun’s paintings offer a light-hearted approach to philosophical enquiry and contemplation of existence. Drawing connotations to the disparate images of the Laughing Buddha and the inane gap toothed grin of Alfred E. Newman, Yue’s self-portraits have been describe by theorist Li Xianting as “a self-ironic response to the spiritual vacuum and folly of modern-day China.”

Often basing his compositions on well known European masterpieces and iconic Chinese art, Yue subverts the grandiose aura of art history through his adaptation of pop aesthetics. Using both the exaggerated expressiveness of cartooning and the stylistic rendering of graphic illustration, Yue depicts his cloned doppelgangers as contorted and grotesque, all scalded pink skin and maniacal toothy cackles.

The acidic tones and commercialised vacuity of his works are used to underscore the insincerity of his figures’ mirth. As both antagonists and anti-heroes, Yue’s hysterical cohorts equally bully the viewer and stand as subjects of ridicule. Using laughter as a denotation of violence and vulnerability, Yue’s paintings balance a zeitgeist of modern day anxiety with an Eastern philosophical ethos, positing the response to the
Yue Minjun
Backyard Garden

2005

Oil on canvas

280 x 400 cm
Immediately humorous and sympathetic, Yue Minjun’s paintings offer a light-hearted approach to philosophical enquiry and contemplation of existence. Drawing connotations to the disparate images of the Laughing Buddha and the inane gap toothed grin of Alfred E. Newman, Yue’s self-portraits have been describe by theorist Li Xianting as “a self-ironic response to the spiritual vacuum and folly of modern-day China.”

Often basing his compositions on well known European masterpieces and iconic Chinese art, Yue subverts the grandiose aura of art history through his adaptation of pop aesthetics. Using both the exaggerated expressiveness of cartooning and the stylistic rendering of graphic illustration, Yue depicts his cloned doppelgangers as contorted and grotesque, all scalded pink skin and maniacal toothy cackles.

The acidic tones and commercialised vacuity of his works are used to underscore the insincerity of his figures’ mirth. As both antagonists and anti-heroes, Yue’s hysterical cohorts equally bully the viewer and stand as subjects of ridicule. Using laughter as a denotation of violence and vulnerability, Yue’s paintings balance a zeitgeist of modern day anxiety with an Eastern philosophical ethos, positing the response to the true nature of reality as an endless cynical guffaw.

Articles

Yue Minjun
Post Auratic Self Portrait of Yue Minjun

The Paintings, sculptures and installations of Yue Minjun always feature uniform laughing faces. And if these laughing faces are observed carefully, it will be noticed that these faces are the face of Yue Minjun.

With these formations of self portraits, Yue Minjun presents various realities that emerge as the background behind the laughing visages. These realities emerge through various easy to recognize symbols, metaphors and signs,
or through depictions of daily life.
The laughing faces and the representations of reality in Yue Minjun's works are closely related. And this relationship shows Yue Minjun's fairly easy to read cynicism in confrontation with reality.

Concerning this cynisism, Yue Minjun has commented that he has commented that he senses an unrecognized power whose center is unknown, but which can engineer/manipulate the behavior of human being through intimidation and terror. This power constitutes a kind of violence that can make human behavior change progressively
Can the works of Yue Minjun be said to be self-portraits?
Doesm his artwork present any insight into the conflict between individuality
And collectivism? Does his work indicate self-identification that represents the pressing of the self-identity into
a collective existence?

Of the many questions that arise, this is
The mose basic: Can the meaning of Yue Minjun's self-portraits be categorized as auratic or post-auratic
Within the development of modern art, the search for reality through representation has been fully deter-mined
by the relationship between the individual absolute and reality.
As being in a set position, concepts within this definition is fully determined by the correspondence of the concept with the object, and is not influenced by any force outside of the correspondence.

The search for reality within contemporary art exhibits a contrary tendency. The individual no longer develops
a concept of reality because the position of the individual is no longer set and central, but rather without a center (ex-centric) or without a fixed central point. At the same time, the field/plain of interpretation or definition within the search for the meaning of reality continuously experiences reconfiguration.

Because of that, the individual becomes unimportant in contemporary art. The question, "who are you?" within a contemporary work of art is
a polyphonous enquiry, or a question that looks both inwardly and outwardly.

Read the entire article Source: pyoart.com