Selected works by Yuken Teruya

Yuken Teruya
Yuken Teruya Golden Arch Parkway McDonald's (brown)

2005

paper, glue

8.3 x 12.7 x 24.2 cm
The detritus of urban life has long provided material solutions for artists; in Yuken Teruya’s work, the discarded becomes the site of poetic transformation. Shopping bags – in some ways the emblematic item of rampant consumerism, one-use receptacles quickly ditched – are placed within the gallery at a ninety-degree angle, their ends to the wall, becoming peepholes for one viewer at a time. Their dark interiors are speckled with light from holes cut into the bag’s paper surface; the shape of the hole is that of a full-grown tree, so the bag becomes both stage (with its own lighting) and source of imagery.
Yuken Teruya
Yuken Teruya Golden Arch Parkway McDonald's (Japanese)

2005

paper, glue

9 x 15.3 x 26.5 cm
Stooping to encounter each work, the viewer is obliged to reimagine the nature of the receptacle: it’s changed from a passive to an active space. Each tree is painstakingly cut, its leaves and branches described with exceptional care, and each bag derives from a slightly different source (sometimes highend fashion boutiques, others Mc- Donald’s), which stages the tree’s connection to the natural world in divergent ways. At times, as in Golden Arch Parkway McDonald’s (Brown), the bag’s mellow ochre tones evoke autumnal shades; at others, such as LVMH Mark Jacobs, the black bag lends the tree a doomy and gothic aspect. Reversing the flow of industry from tree to paper, Teruya’s work has an environmental sensitivity that’s hard to miss. It’s also a poignant assertion of the role of the creative artist: as someone who finds meaning amid the morass of stuff we leave behind.
Yuken Teruya
Golden Arch Parkway McDonalds (Red Yellow)

2005

Paper, glue

12.7 x 17.8 x 28 cm
Yuken Teruya
Golden Arch Parkway McDonalds (Yellow)

2005

paper, glue

12.7 x 17.8 x 28 cm
Yuken Teruya
Golden Arch Parkway McDonald's (blue tree)

2005

paper, glue

12.7 x 17.7 x 28 cm
Yuken Teruya
LVMH - Berluti

2005

oil on canvas

10 x 17.5 x 22.5 cm
Yuken Teruya
LVMH - Chandon

2005

paper, glue

9 x 13 x 44.5 cm
Yuken Teruya
LVMH - Christian Dior

2005

paper, glue

8 x 15 x 19 cm
Yuken Teruya
LVMH - Givenchy

2005

paper, glue

10 x 20 x 18 cm
Yuken Teruya
LVMH - Hennessy

2005

paper, glue

10 x 10 x 37 cm
Yuken Teruya
LVMH - Le Bon Marche

2005

paper, glue

10 x 19.5 x 22.5 cm
Yuken Teruya
LVMH - Louis Vuitton

2005

paper, glue

14.5 x 40 x 33.5 cm
Yuken Teruya
LVMH - Marc Jacobs

2005

paper, glue

15 x 20 x 30.3 cm
Yuken Teruya
LVMH - Pucci

2005

paper, glue

9 x 23 x 16.5 cm
Yuken Teruya
LVMH - Sephora

2005

paper, glue

5 x 15 x 23 cm
Text by Ben Street

Articles

Yuken Teruya - Notice Forest

For Notice Forest, Yuken Teruya creates enchanting dioramas within products made from paper such as a take-out bag or the cardboard tube inside a toilet paper role. Carving detailed, miniature trees in each, Teruya makes fragile, magical sculptures about nature, craft, and consumerism.
Yuken Teruya is adept at transforming objects using very modest, intimately-scaled gestures. In Notice Forest, the artist subtly draws our attention to the effects of consumerism and globalism -- alluding to the depletion of fragile natural resources, the disappearance of cultural traditions and identities, and the distribution of wealth in the new world order. Working with discarded paper bags from takeout joints such as McDonald's and Krispy Kreme, commercial gift bags and post office packages, Teruya creates delicately rendered shadowboxes in which the sculptural form cut out from the container is shaped by the container itself. Using photography as the starting point, Teruya photographs trees he encounters in his daily life and then painstakingly recreates the form of the individual trees as paper cutouts that are suspended inside the bags. Light filters down through the holes to illuminate the tiny tree within each bag's miniature interior landscape in what the Teruya describes as his attempt to return a spent consumer product back to the forest.

Source:www.diverseworks.org

"You-I, You-I"
by Yuken Teruya

Yuken Teruya was born 1973 in Okinawa and is presently working in New York. His homeland lies in the south of Japan and is made up of many small islands. A general map of Japan usually doesnユt even show the Okinawa island group. The district is part of the subtropical zone and accounts for the early flourishing of a light-hearted and lively culture, different from that found on Japanユs main islands. What has made the place so famous is the tragedy of Okinawaユs more recent history, the havoc wreaked by the end of the Second World War.

The work "You-I, You-I" by Yuken Teruya seems, at first glance, to be an original and traditional kimono from Okinawa, a メbingataモ. But a closer look at the kimonoユs pattern reveals military motifs such as parachutists and military planes. After Okinawa was returned to Japan, the American military bases were kept in place and spread over 20% of the main island.

Read the entire article here
Source: www.murataandfriends.de