•  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
  •  Installation Shots From: Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
    Pangaea: New Art From Africa And Latin America
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Previous Exhibitions - Jennifer Kostuik Gallery

DAVID BURDENY:
SACRED & SECULAR

January 28- March 14, 2010

In 2001 David Burdeny's "Drift" Series presented an identically placed horizon within the frame to graphically join a series of seascapes taken around the world. This concept formed the diagram of the "Sacred and Secular" series of joining distant locations (in this case skylines) by a common horizon. Sacred and Secular is an ongoing series of photographs that depict urban edge conditions and built environments throughout the world. In the course of Western architecture and urbanism, there is a long history attached to the Ideal, Visionary and the Fantastic as notions to create built space. For his newest series, Vancouver photography artist, David Burdeny, sees the scale, colour and density of the urban fabric always generating a unique vernacular. When removed from its context, the vernacular simply becomes kitsch such as the Bellagio in Vegas, or Mont Saint-Michel vs. Disney’s Magic Kingdom. Spanning across the globe, the locations of his new images are often distant in latitude, typology and syntax, commencing with the category defying works of 21st century “Starchitects” and including recent or ancient manifestations in Dubai, China, Egypt, Europe, Greenland, USA and Canada.

Burdeny’s intention for each image is to be highly site specific when viewed up close, and more generic when viewed from afar. He obtains this perspective by having the earth, air and water in each image rendered large and neutral - an infinite field on which society builds and transform the landscape. Skylines of the photographed cities can be, metaphorically speaking, read as the DNA for whatever city/settlement is contained within the image. An 8x10 negative is used to preserve as much detail as possible so the act of looking around the images at nose length is part of the intent and subsequent enjoyment.


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